Composite/S-Video to Component

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by PuzZah, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. PuzZah

    PuzZah
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    I have a component input which I'd like to be able to plug an old composite cable source into.

    What's the best way of doing this? They're both analogue signals I think so technically it shouldn't be a problem? I'm probably being hugely naive here.

    Audio obviously isn't a problem, however video would be?

    Would a simple S-Video to component video converter cable work.

    For example Here

    So Composite source -> Phono to S-Video Converter -> S-Video to Composite Converter

    Please if you have any better suggestions let me know as I'm sure there's bound to be a better way of doing this!

    I'm on a budget so ideally I don't want to have to buy an expensive box which converts the signal but if needs must.

    Thanks for your time.

    Ben
     
  2. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    YUV Component, S-Video & composite are all different video signals that need hardware conversion to go from one to the other - they are not just physical connections.
    The cable you linked to would only work if the component input can be set to accept an S-video signal.

    Probably the cheapest & easiest way to send composite signals to a component input would be to get an AV receiver with video upconversion. However you will always be stuck with composite video quality regardless of the final connection used. You can't add quality that isn't there in the first place.

    Mark.
     
  3. PuzZah

    PuzZah
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    Thanks for your reply, MarkE19.

    I didn't hope to gain any quality by converting the signal, I just hoped to be able to plug it in. Alas I can't do that.

    Are you able to recommend a hardware converter?

    I'll look into the TV and Amp to see if either of them are capable of receiving an s-video signal through the component input.

    Thanks again for your time.

    Ben
     
  4. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    What amp have you got? Many AV receivers can upconvert a composite or S-Video signal to component, so if yours can then you wont need any more equipment to get everything connected.

    Mark.
     
  5. PuzZah

    PuzZah
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    I don't yet have an Amplifier. I'm currently in the market for one in the £300-£400 range. If you're able to recommend one for me to look into this would be fantastic!

    Thanks
     
  6. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    Have a look at Richer Sounds etc for AV receivers with video upscaling. In the £300 - £400 range you should have no trouble finding one.
    From personal experiance I can recommend Denon receivers and if you have a look Here you will see the Denon AVR1909 for £300 that has:
    just check that it upconverts to component as well if you don't have an HDMI input to the TV.

    The above is just one example with many other good receivers from other makes such as Pioneer, Yamaha, Onkyo etc. Go to the Receivers section of the forum and do some searching to see what others are saying about the receivers, and ask a few questions to get what is right for you.

    Good luck,
    Mark.
     

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