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Component MUST be better than HDMI - my experiences

skk3

Prominent Member
Wow!

I have just been lucky enough to audition the Denon 1930, Pioneer 989 and Arcam 137 all via HDMI into my Toshiba 32WL48. There is STILL grain on the screen with each machine! I am gutted. Then I dug out an old What HiFi mag containing a review of this TV and it is stated that the picture is better via component!!!!How can this be! Does anyone out there have a DVD connected via component to this TV and what is the picture like please. I am desperate for help!
 

clarkyb

Established Member
I have just been lucky enough to audition the Denon 1930, Pioneer 989 and Arcam 137 all via HDMI into my Toshiba 32WL48. How can this be! Does anyone out there have a DVD connected via component to this TV and what is the picture like please. I am desperate for help!

1. Which machine produces the best picture over hdmi, and what resolution were you outputting at?
2. I think it depends on how the manufacturer intended the screen to function- i.e. they may have spend more time on the componant circuits as oposed to the didital ones- seems strange though doesnt it [i can't remember where i heard this from either]
3. If the hi-fi shop [or wherever you borrowed the equipment from] was willing to lend you 3 dvd players i'm sure they could lend you a componant cable aswell. So try it out for yourself
Clark

+ with hmdi being digital and all it accentuates any kind of noise or picture flaws, whereas componant seems more smooth and tends to be more forgiving- at least thats how i've found it to be when setting up some of my friends systems.
+what dvd's were you watching, some dvd's have bad transfers full of grain, try watching 'the village' if you can- the picture is superlative
 
S

simonharris

Guest
No, picture is better over HDMI, the resolution is slightly better than component and there there is nothing to compare to analogue picture artifacts if a decent HDMI cable is used.
 

Nic Rhodes

Distinguished Member
No, picture is better over HDMI, the resolution is slightly better than component and there there is nothing to compare to analogue picture artifacts if a decent HDMI cable is used.

I disagree with this. HDMI was never introduced as a 'better' interface, it was a digital interface drive by copy protection and convenience. What is better re HDMI or analogue is just down to how it is implemented on equipment being used. The signals transmitted are essentially the same and HDMI cables show little different if they meet the bandwidth they need at the length that is require unless 'special measures' are used which appear on but a rare few cables currenly.

There should be no difference in resolution. Signals are often more processed in HDMI (4:4:4 RGB) and several of the chips have issues / compatibility problems with BTB, WTW through partnering equipment. Analogue signals are at the mercy of analogue engineering and are more prone to poorly shield cheap cables but all this stuff is down to how it is implemented and not the interface per se. As someone who has a large system, cabled with HDMI and component, across multiple SD and HD sources, I find component better in most cases (if not all), but it is just a press of a button to change. There are more important things to worry about than just an interface to get a good picture.
 

skk3

Prominent Member
Thanks Guys

Still got the grain though!

I have written to Toshiba Customer Services with a complaint because the TV was sold on the pretext of that HDMI socket performing properly. I will wait and see what they say?!

If I underperformed in my job I would be disciplined.
 

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