Comms Cab Layout Suggestion

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by Haz87, Aug 13, 2017.

  1. Haz87

    Haz87
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    Hi all,
    Currently working on house refurb and have ran network points to all rooms and outside areas for cctv purposes etc. With the loft conversion, i got myself a decent sized comms cupboard. From work i got a 23u (got an extra 1u at the bottom) floor standing cabinet and currently trying to work out the layout for it.

    upload_2017-8-13_11-47-5.png

    Any suggestions or improvements etc would be greatly appreciated.

    cheers,

    Haz
     

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  2. Chester

    Chester
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    Not bad. Are you blanking at the top because the front of the cab is fowling this U? If not, then make use of it. Taking the front uprights back a little might give you better access, possibly at the expense of needing a deeper cab though. Also can you merge the CCTV patch panel with the phone patch panel? That will save a U at the expense of slightly longer patch cables.

    You could fit a brush accessory in some of the blanks to pass cables through.

    Think about 48 port switches for port density, and then you could possibly lose a dedicated PoE switch for CCTV, unless separation for continued operation is an objective. High-end switches are super reliable now. You could always set-aside a cold spare if needs be.

    The NVR is likely to be 2 or more U's. Perhaps with the savings above, you'll be able to account for this and other height errors as well. For instance, you probably don't mean to put 4 Sky boxes in the rack, but more that 2 will occupy 2 u's each, and same with the UPS.
     
  3. mickevh

    mickevh
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    You don't seem to have any "cable managers" - it could get spaghettified very quickly. You could consider replacing the blanks with a few cable managers and maybe re-jigging a bit to make best use of them.

    If your phone cabling is also UTP, there's no need to have a separate patch panel for it. You can terminate the phone lobes onto exactly the same "RJ45" type patch panels ports as the data cables and potentially save yourself a bit more space. However, because POTS uses common bus wiring topology compared to the point-to-point "star" topology of ethernet, you'll either need to create a special multi-way "jumper" cable for the phone lobes or jump a few patchbay ports together to achieve the same thing. (Make sure they are very clearly labelled as you don't want to mix ethenet & POTS - not least since POTS gets about 50volts sent from the exchange.)

    Good idea to have UPS at the bottom - they tend to be very heavy, though a 1U UPS is unlikely to avail much run time with all that kit and can be very (physically) deep. Some of the APC UPS's are 2U (or more.) APC's web site used to have a "sizer" where you can enter in the power requirements of all your kit (if it doesn't already know about it) and required run time and it'll come up with some recommendations. UPS's are basically chemical batteries and don't last forever. Every few years you should replace them, (though you'd be surprised how rarely anyone does, even in business environments.)

    Have you contemplated how much heat all this kit is going to generate and how you might dissipate it...?
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
  4. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    And how much power\electricity this lot will use? (Also fans then on decent switches tend to be particularly noisy and can drink a fair bit of use)

    100W 24/7 is over £100 now so keep an eye on it.

    Have you really got 96 standard CAT ports? If you have fair enough but are they likely to all be in use at one in which case they don't all need to be patched in. I would want something better than a router to manage the configuration and DHCP etc.

    Sky HD boxes need a minimum of 2U and some shelves with lips can be a pain to get them in without removing the shelf if they are bunched up. They also get quite warm. Sky Q is thinner but gets even hotter.

    I have got a 42U rack in my garage and did have a really noisy switch. Given its in an attached but well insulated garage I could still hear that switch in other rooms :)

    I have more space dedicated to AV amps in mine.
     
  5. mickevh

    mickevh
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    I see you have allotted 2U for "modem/router" - it that because you are intending to deploy 2x modem/routers (ie you've got two separate ISP links) or just that you've budgeted 2U of space for a modem/router "shelf?"

    Just noticed CCTV "patch panel" - are you intending physically different connectors for CCTV or is it just another "RJ45" type. If the latter, there's no need to have it on a separate PP (though, there's no reason not to either.) The ports in a patch panel are all physically/electrically separate so there's no problem mixing cabled lobes for different purposes in the same PP. In big commercial premises we do it all the time - all cat whatever UTP terminated onto patch panels, often reflecting the building/room layout (at often sometimes seemingly entirely at random,) rather than the purpose - though there's plenty of variations on the theme and "good" reasons for having particular ports in particular panels (rack interlinks for example, though they won't be something concerning this build.)

    It's "whats patched to what" that determined functionality (ethernet, fax, TV, etc.) Sometimes we use different coloured patch-cords to indicate function and of course on any decently complicated build, it's worth creating a "patching schedule" (list of what goes where) often with a paper copy hung/pasted in the rack. And a death sentence or worse visited on anyone that repatches anything without updating the patching schedule.

    To echo the theme of economising on switches - there's no reason not to use any "spare" ports on your POE switch for none-POE devices. Standards based POE simply won't deliver power to none-POE devices. That might save you a bit more on switches (both in terms of space and cost of buying them.)
     
  6. dozen

    dozen
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  7. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    Still curious as to many devices there are, a lot for a domestic installation?
     
  8. Haz87

    Haz87
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    Hi all,
    Thanks for getting back. Sorry for delay in replying, took a few days to go down south.

    While doing the house refurb, I went a little overboard with wiring cat6 cable in the rooms. Each room has 7 network points (4 at tv location and 3 around the room). A few in the hallway for telephone points using the rj45/rj11 adaptor. We have a outbuilding used as office for family business which I ran cat6 cables for data/phone and cctv.

    I hate cables or shelves around TVs screens so going to store the sky HD boxes in the comma cupboard. My brother works for sky and we got a trial of sky q but because it was over wifi the signal to boxes were intermittent. Once the tv over ip is out then will look at upgrading.

    Two of the patch panels will be blank as we only doing refurb part of the house. Going to move the cctv patch panel with the others as suggested. I added a few blanks I case I need to add 1u coolers.

    Looking to change current equipment (about 8 years old) for all ubiquiti Poe switches and as suggested maybe a 48port unifi switch but this will be done over a a year as budget for buying equipment is currently non-existent.

    I will add some photos once I start putting the kit together.

    Thank you all for your suggestions.

    Cheers,

    H.
     
  9. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    Sky Q works fine over hard wire just need to enable in the "installers" menu but I would definitely recommend a minimum of 2U per Sky HD box otherwise they won't fit.

    Remember as well you don't need to necessarily to hook all your ports into your switch and that will keep your cost down as switches particularly 48 port can be rather expensive :)
     
  10. Haz87

    Haz87
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    Thanks @ChuckMountain. Not many of the ports are going to be active as the plan is not to have TVs in bedroom but only when needed in the future.
     

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