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Circular polarising filter query

snerkler

Distinguished Member
I’m off to Cuba in a couple of days and will be taking a trip to Havana whilst I’m there and was thinking of taking my CPL filter. Ideally I don’t want to keep taking it on and off so was wondering if there are any negative effects for those times I just want to point and shoot without having time to make sure the polariser is rotated to the right angle?

Now I’m aware of the strange gradation of blue skies on wide angle (this should be an issue for street shots as there won’t be a lot of sky) and the effect on reflections but is there anything else I need to be aware of?

I know there’s a school of thought that says you can pretty much achieve the effect of a CPL in PP, but I still prefer to use a CPL as I still think it looks more natural.
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
Thanks, not sure it really answers my questions though tbh. Also, he states that the polarisers get rid of some wanted light but doesn't say whether he tried or if you can get this back simply by turning the polariser so that it doesn't polarise. I guess the only way I'll find out is trial and error ;)
 

shotokan101

Banned
Thanks, not sure it really answers my questions though tbh. Also, he states that the polarisers get rid of some wanted light but doesn't say whether he tried or if you can get this back simply by turning the polariser so that it doesn't polarise. I guess the only way I'll find out is trial and error ;)

....but you will always lose some light with cpl even at its most neutral setting..... And of course you can presume that it's OK to use cpl other than in the situations he points out.... ? o_O
 

AMc

Distinguished Member
From my limited use you can reduce the polarising effect to zero or near zero by rotating the front but it will still reduce the amount of light entering the lens acting as an ND.
That might not be a problem in the day but might be a pain in the evening or night?
I'd probably avoid it on the basis it might cause weird effects and I'd forget it mught be the CPL in the heat of the moment.
As you say I think you'll have to suck it and see.
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
....but you will always lose some light with cpl even at its most neutral setting..... And of course you can presume that it's OK to use cpl other than in the situations he points out.... ? o_O
I don't think lack of light will be an issue in Cuban daytime ;)
 

Loopthrough

Well-known Member
You'll always get better, more nuanced landscapes (in bright light) with a polarizer. I wouldn't go to Cuba for photography without one.
 

shotokan101

Banned
I don't think lack of light will be an issue in Cuban daytime ;)

A) You never said anything about only shooting in daytime :nono:

B) I've heard it rumoured that it can be pretty dark inside the sort of clubs you like to frequent on holiday - even during the day.. :eek: :p
 

newbie1

Distinguished Member
Not had any downside apart from wide angle as you mention and light loss. This article has some scenarios where you might want the reflected light so best not to use in that case:
When NOT to use a Polarizing Filter

Also, might increase risk flare?
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member

Dandy76

Standard Member
I have used my CP filter without two many problems, as others have said by rotating the ring to remove pretty much all effect. The only thing I have had to do once or twice is adjust the exposure in slightly lower light conditions. One reason I did leave it on as it is also protecting the main (more expensive) lens behind it, so a double benefit. The only other pain is that if you are shooting portrait to landscape a lot, you of course need to constantly adjust the front of the lens, but easy enough to do.
 

Faldrax

Well-known Member
The light loss from a CPL is similar to that of a 1 - 1.5 stop ND filter (which might actually be useful if you've got bright sunshine in Cuba and want to open up the aperture wide!)
 

edward

Active Member
Confess, I put a high quality UV filter on any lens that will take it, just to protect the glass. A CP as standard would mean constantly checking the orientation was best for each situation. I'm slow enough already, and with a lens hood in place...
 

Snake79

Active Member
I would advise some careful consideration when using a polariser. I find it useful to reduce glare from windows, water, cars, wet ground and leaves. Using it to deepen the the blue sky and increase saturation on green and browns can be very nice too although be careful with the suns position in the sky as it can cause a the sky to be unbalanced with an unantural shade of blue on one side, especially on wider lenses

I find the dehaze slider in LR to be a good alternative to a polariser if all you want to do is add some extra puch to an image. A little to the right can be quite pleasing on certain images, just don't go mad with it. It won't replace a polariser completely as it can't see through glass and water.
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
Confess, I put a high quality UV filter on any lens that will take it, just to protect the glass. A CP as standard would mean constantly checking the orientation was best for each situation. I'm slow enough already, and with a lens hood in place...
UV’s divide opinions tbh. I don’t use them as I find lens hoods offer all the protection I need but YMMV.
I would advise some careful consideration when using a polariser. I find it useful to reduce glare from windows, water, cars, wet ground and leaves. Using it to deepen the the blue sky and increase saturation on green and browns can be very nice too although be careful with the suns position in the sky as it can cause a the sky to be unbalanced with an unantural shade of blue on one side, especially on wider lenses

I find the dehaze slider in LR to be a good alternative to a polariser if all you want to do is add some extra puch to an image. A little to the right can be quite pleasing on certain images, just don't go mad with it. It won't replace a polariser completely as it can't see through glass and water.
Well I’m back from my travels and pleased to report no ill effects from the CPL, it was on the lens permanently all holiday :smashin:
 

12harry

Distinguished Member
Good to know it was a success...
this from Hoya's US website (hence spelling)

"....Circular polarizing filters allow photographers to achieve creative, in-camera, effects not possible after the image is created. A polarizing filter simply filters out unwanted reflections from non-metallic surfaces such as water and glass in addition to light reflecting off moisture and pollution in the atmosphere. By rotating the filter you can select just the right amount of filtration needed to achieve the creative effect. This results in bluer skies, greener leaves, reduced or eliminated reflections, and greater clarity in your final image...."



Since digital cameras allow the image to be checked, any unwanted effects can be minimised or removed entirely. My understanding; a CPF is a conventional polarising filter with additional tech so it doesn't interfere with digital camera operation. They do appear to be more expensive - and as others have stated there is light-loss - However, with modern sensors that may not be an issue, except at night perhaps, where an extra "stop" may mean a less-blurred picture.

Cheers.
 

wongataa

Well-known Member
My understanding; a CPF is a conventional polarising filter with additional tech so it doesn't interfere with digital camera operation.
Circular polarisers are a regular linear polariser with a quarter wave plate to depolarise the light coming out of them. They predated digital cameras by many years. I had them for my film cameras. They actually came about because linear polarisers can degrade autofocus performance in SLR (any kind) cameras.
 

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