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Cinema Re-EQ any good?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by tommy, Nov 6, 2000.

  1. tommy

    tommy
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    My onkyo (tx-ds575) amp has a feature called Re-EQ (Cinema Re-Equalization), I suppose that other amps has the same or similar function.
    Anybody using this function or not?
     
  2. Mad Max

    Mad Max
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    Hi Tommy...

    I have an "old" Onkyo TX-DS646, and will have a TX-DS787 delivered next friday (So they say).

    That Cinema Re-Eq function simulates a bigger room. If you have your system in a small environment, it should increase the soundstage.

    Personally, I don't use it, mostly because I'm pretty happy with the sound the Onkyo has with no effects on. I usually have everything turned off, because it is how the system sounds better to me, but some people find big improvements with RE-EQ.

    Try it, and if you leke it better, keep it on. Otherwise, don't. It's all up to the way it sounds to you.

    Regards.

    Rui

    ------------------
    An adult is just a kid with expensive toys.

    Rui
     
  3. Stuart M. Robinson

    Stuart M. Robinson
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    Tommy,

    Cinema RE-EQ is a technology licensed from LucasFilm, it's part of the THX post-processing feature-set.

    Its purpose is not to "simulate a bigger room" or "increase the soundstage" but to counter the X-Curve motion picture frequency response spectrum, which in the home often causes movies to sound too bright.

    Re-EQ rolls off the high frequencies by a pre-determined (and fixed) amount. There are similar schemes in place from non-THX licensed manufacturers. How well it works will largely depend on your room and your loudspeakers. Plus, Re-EQ should only be used with motion picture material, nothing else.


    Stuart M. Robinson http://www.smr-group.co.uk/

    [This message has been edited by Stuart M. Robinson (edited 09-11-2000).]
     
  4. tommy

    tommy
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    Thanks Stuart,

    One more thing though: Is Re-EQ usable for all motion picture material, or just those that have the THX logo/intro?
     
  5. Guest

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    In a similar vein, does any know if my Yam A2's proprietry movie DSP modes do a similar "treble softening"?

    Thanks,
    Joel
     
  6. Stuart M. Robinson

    Stuart M. Robinson
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    Tommy,

    Re-EQ is suitable for all motion picture material (except the small number of titles that have been pre-equalised).

    The soundtracks of THX software aren't really any different to those of plain vanilla Dolby Digital, Dolby Surround or DTS except that they meet LucasFilm's quality control standards.

    All movies are mixed according to a standardised EQ environment, specifically ISO 2969, commonly known as the "X-Curve".

    Here's an excerpt from an article I wrote about THX a little while ago:

    One psychoacoustic phenomenon is that humans expect distant sounds to have high frequency attenuation and THX compensates for that. Placing two identical loudspeakers at different distances away from the listener but equalising the volume from them, results in what appears to be identical sound qualities, but measuring the outputs would reveal that the further loudspeaker has an attenuated high frequency response. Commercial theatres and dubbing stages were standardised to the ISO 2969 roll-off curve in the 1950’s (applied to the theatre equalisation and not the soundtrack). However, this does not exactly match the sensitivity of the human ear across the audio spectrum, thus resulting in sound engineers perceiving poor high frequency response upon playback and increasing the level to compensate. Because of this, when the soundtrack is replayed at home in what is a comparitively small space, listeners who are much closer to the loudspeakers, are subjected to excessive high frequency levels.
    LucasFilm armed a panel of mixing engineers with equalisers and gave them the task of equalising near and far sources. This gave two re-equalisation curves, one theoretical based on measurements, and one psycoacoustic based on this experiment. The average from these comprises the re-equalisation circuits employed by all THX processors. In reality, only 3dB of attenuation is applied to the signal above 15kHz, but again, the exact specifics are not published.
    At this point it is important to note that only soundtracks produced under the ISO 2969 equalisation curve should be processed using the THX Cinema mode. Dolby Surround television programmes, compact discs and live sporting events should be decoded without the THX re-equalisation, that is, with the straightforward Dolby Pro-logic mode.


    Stuart M. Robinson - http://www.smr-group.co.uk
     

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