cinema craft settings

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by evans, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. evans

    evans
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    hello all

    Just wondering what if any settings would help me with faster moving video like video in a car or zooming. I have had success using quantizer matrixes for the clarity but no idea about smoothening the motion scenes.

    any help appreciated. I dont know if the quantizer characteristics play any difference or the dc precion.
    :lease:
     
  2. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    if you are trying to emulate the look of cinema on a domestic/prosumer camcorder then my first advice would be don't. They are fundamentally different technologies, with fundamentally viewing environments/expectations/perceptions/experiences.

    If you were determined to try anyway, I would reduce the shutter speed to 1/25th if your camera allows (see if you had told us what camera you were using this would be so much easier) and also set the ccd to progressive or frame scan.

    Set dressing: avoid strong reds, avoid very bright cyans. Use a reflected type light meter and keep all areas that you require detail in (i.e. other than where you want bleaching or crunching) within a 5 stop range. (this keeps everything within the contrast ratio of most camcorders, nowhere near the contrast latitude of film, but this is a film technigue)

    If you are using lights, then use big lights from far away with diffusser.

    Regards motion & zooming.

    Motion, for video the preferred technique is to increase the shutter, but this can look strobey, if you want fluidity (but at the cost of detail) then keep the shutter at !/25th.

    Zooming. Don't zoom, track. Have a look at most cinema and see how often they actually zoom, you can buy cheap, decent tracks from B.Hague.

    In post grade your footage, lift the reds ever so slightly, crunch the blacks ever so slighty.

    Finally, if you are viewing it on a tv, all of this will look naff anyway, stick to 1/50th and say 'I SHOOT VIDEO AND I'M PROUD OF IT'.
     
  3. evans

    evans
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    Roy thanks for the explanation, actually my video camera is a sony pc 115 and i am not after any cinema type affect. I actually have taken some footage involving faster motion , ie a slow moving car. Although my camera does have image stabilization there are so many setting in cinema craft that i dont know what is best for this kind of footage.

    I have used canopus procoder v2 but that is more automated with the settings but cinema craft is a bit more complicated. I just need some knowledge about the settings of cinema craft regarding motion scenes. would intrablock dc precision play a difference or quantizer characteristics?

    I suppose trial and error but any hints would be welcome. Your so right about zooming i intend to contiously cut this out. But unfortunately when on holidays its hard when your pressed for time to shoot stuff.:clap:
     

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