Chrysler Building

HotblackDesiato

Well-known Member
Taken last Saturday in NYC.

Used this as a chance to mess around in the new version of camera RAW, where i converted to grayscale, added an S curve, pushed the yellow and orange, pulled the blue and magneta, before split toning. In PS cloned out some dust bunnies, sharpened and re-sized.

Shutter speed 1/80th
Lens Aperture F/8
Focal Length 85mm
ISO Speed 100
Metering Mode Pattern
Exposure Program Aperture Priority
EC +0.3 step
Date Picture Taken 16/12/2006 21:00 - 5
 

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Liquid101

Distinguished Member
I like what you've done with the colour, gives it a real silvery glow.

I would have been tempted to straighten her up a little though. Just find the angle a little distracting.
 

HotblackDesiato

Well-known Member
I like what you've done with the colour, gives it a real silvery glow.

I would have been tempted to straighten her up a little though. Just find the angle a little distracting.
Thanks for the comments on the colour. The distortion, keystoning, is par for the course, i think, without a tilt and shift. I tried various rotatations but unless i used a much tighter crop i couldn't find one that floated my boat. Thanks again.
 

colbec23

Novice Member
I can see what liquid means about the angle, but it seems pretty difficult to remove the distortion using software as the angle is both upwards and sideways? In any event, I think the angle actually gives the shot a bit of dynamism - makes you a bit dizzy, a bit like standing at the foot of a tower in Manhattan I guess.
Has anyone got/used a tilt and shift lens? This month's theme is begging for it!
 

Liquid101

Distinguished Member
Has anyone got/used a tilt and shift lens? This month's theme is begging for it!
I used a 5x4 camera quite a lot about 10-11 years ago, and it was very easy to correct distortion using the film plate - of course you always had the problem of seeing virtually nothing when you were composing the photograph. You could also control the focal plane, which made it possible to place focus just about anywhere you wanted. The first aerial 'model city' shots were done like this, long before photoshop enabled you to do it.

I also tried a 35mm SLR with a tilt shift lens, but it was utterly hopeless, and very difficult to get anything approaching sharp and even results.

These days, it's very easy to do exactly the same thing in Photoshop. OK, you'll never correct the upward angle of this shot, but you could correct the converging verticals. The shot I entered had a very slight correction of verticals just to make it look more natual looking.
 

HotblackDesiato

Well-known Member
These days, it's very easy to do exactly the same thing in Photoshop. OK, you'll never correct the upward angle of this shot, but you could correct the converging verticals. The shot I entered had a very slight correction of verticals just to make it look more natual looking.
I tried a couple of techniques using the free distort tool and the lens correction tool. I could get a reasonable correction but nothing i was really happy with. The image would get squat, then needed stretching and pinching. I've always liked this building and will probably head back in a few weeks with a longer lens, and try and get up a building to give me fewer perspective issues.
 

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