Question CAT6 to Out House...

Y15HAL

Active Member
Good Evening All,

I'm currently having an out house built, and will be having power run to it, and 2 x cat6 cables, to have it network ready.....

My builder has some of this stuff which he said i can use.....

CAT6 UTP Network Cable - Grey - 305Mtr (Easy Pull Box)

From what i've read, it looks to be what i need, but i'll most likely be using RJ45 connectors as opposed to wall terminated sockets.....Was thinking of using these plugs.....

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07B9RDW9Q/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2XY2J3FRQ9IR9&psc=1

Does all that seem OK?

Finally, I'm assuming this will be OK if its underground in some form of trunking?

Thanks

Vishal
 

John7

Well-known Member
What’s the cable length? I’d run a couple of redundant spares as well.

I’d probably use a wall plate termination as well to avoid wear on `the cables.

If you use connectors, presume you have a suitable crimping tool, otherwise I’d recommend getting one.

Cable should be run underground (it’s not UV resistant) and segregated from mains cable run a separate pipe to the mains cables.
 

Y15HAL

Active Member
What’s the cable length? I’d run a couple of redundant spares as well.

I’d probably use a wall plate termination as well to avoid wear on `the cables.

If you use connectors, presume you have a suitable crimping tool, otherwise I’d recommend getting one.

Cable should be run underground (it’s not UV resistant) and segregated from mains cable run a separate pipe to the mains cables.
It'll be around 40m.

Fair point, i may just terminate into the wall in the outhouse, and then just have the RJ45 on the other end.

Thanks for the tip on running it separately......I assume if they're next to each other (but in a separate pipe) that's OK?
 

meagabyte

Well-known Member
As long as it’s in trunking without any sort of power cable running next to it then that UTP cable will be fine. Running extra cables is a good idea as easy to do now while it’s being put in. Better to many than not enough. I second using a face plate to stop wear and tear on the RJ45 plug. Can always replace a cable from wall to device. Eaiser then cutting the end of and re-crimping every so often. Running multiple network cables together isn’t to much of a problem. Tend to get bigger issues if your running power cables in the same trunk.
 

Y15HAL

Active Member
As long as it’s in trunking without any sort of power cable running next to it then that UTP cable will be fine. Running extra cables is a good idea as easy to do now while it’s being put in. Better to many than not enough. I second using a face plate to stop wear and tear on the RJ45 plug. Can always replace a cable from wall to device. Eaiser then cutting the end of and re-crimping every so often. Running multiple network cables together isn’t to much of a problem. Tend to get bigger issues if your running power cables in the same trunk.
Thanks for the input :)
 

razer1

Active Member
That cable is designed for faceplates as its solid core copper rather than the stranded that patch cables use.

For the price of a couple of quid, id use faceplates. Would make a neater finish too :)

And as above, run in trunking when being used outside and run more than needed. More as redundancy than anything.

Whenever im running new cables now, I run 2 or more. I converted the garage into a workspace last year and ran 4 for various things whilst I could get to everything and didnt have to try and fish through a 1/2" gap along the ceiling that there is now its all insulated and boarded out..
 

Y15HAL

Active Member
That cable is designed for faceplates as its solid core copper rather than the stranded that patch cables use.

For the price of a couple of quid, id use faceplates. Would make a neater finish too :)

And as above, run in trunking when being used outside and run more than needed. More as redundancy than anything.

Whenever im running new cables now, I run 2 or more. I converted the garage into a workspace last year and ran 4 for various things whilst I could get to everything and didnt have to try and fish through a 1/2" gap along the ceiling that there is now its all insulated and boarded out..
Yep, will go for a face plate in the out house, but will terminate with RJ45 at the other end, as it will go into my switch.

Was going to do 2 runs of CAT 6, but might just do 3.
 

razer1

Active Member
Ive never tried using plugs on solid core cable.

Some have managed it but its not correct use of the cable but can be done from what Ive seen.

Can be a bit hit and miss though so if it was me, id just stick a surface backbox & faceplate and use a patch cable.

i'd defo run more than you think you'll ever need! Always a need for network cables for something! :) Saves the hassle if one goes down too ;)
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
You can sometimes "get away" with crimping plugs onto solid core cable, but of course it's outside standards and best practice. The plugs the OP had linked in an earlier post were "special" ones designed for use on solid core cable.
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
You're fine crimping plugs onto solid cable if the connector isn't being plugged/unplugged regularly. The 'special' plugs do grip the cable a bit better, but if I don't have any with me I don't worry about using braided plugs on solid cable. :)
 

Y15HAL

Active Member
Good stuff.

Once plugged in, i can't see myself regularly moving it around, so once it's in, it should stay in place for ages :)
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
The solid cables are not as bendy as patch cables so are not as easy to stay in place. As others would terminate them into a wall socket.
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
Yeah for the sake of £5 of parts I'd usually save myself the hassle and terminate to a faceplate, definitely. :)

If needs must for whatever reason though there's no real need to worry about terminating solid copper to RJ45 plugs, just as long as you remember it's not a patch lead. ;)
 

The Dude

Distinguished Member
One useful tip with regards to solid cable > plugs is to trim back 2"+ of outer sheath, separate/sort the conductors then give each one a few runs through tightly pinched fingers to iron any kinks out of the (stiff) conductor. - Even the faintest hint of a kink in a conductor makes getting the plug on a pain in the arse.

Once you have 8 tidy, straight wires sort them into pin order and trim them down to length.


If you don't do this on the first one you terminate, you'll do it on all the rest. ;)
 

Y15HAL

Active Member

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