Answered Cat6 Drum/Reel Suggestions

Munzz

Active Member
Hi All,

Currently in the process of kitting my new property out with a network infrastructure but keen to get some advice on Cat6 cabling.

Cables will be used for AP's and keystone modules to a switch/patch panel, all internal runs.

Probably looking at around 100m's worth and not looking to spend a bomb as I know this stuff can work out expensive.

Any recommendations?
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
For permanently installed cable runs, one normally uses "solid core" (as opposed to "stranded" or "patch") cable terminated onto IDC type "punch down" blocks.

100m is a pretty standard size for "bulk" cabe, at that length it often comes supplied in a (cardboard) box (rather than a drum) albeit that the box design is supposed to prevent (perhaps "deter" would be a better term) chances of the cable snagging, coiling, kinking, etc. as you pull it out.

There are some snake oil salesmen out there that sell a form of cable called "Copper Clad Aluminium" (CCA) which isn't allowed in the proper "cat" standards (which mandate the use of pure copper conductors.) Sometimes they try and pass it off as "catX certified," "catX equivalent," "CatX tested" and other BS such as "made up" cats such as cat5a, cat6e, none of which exist at time of posting. Avoid such things, it performs less well and is outside standards. If the price looks too good to be true, it probably is.

If you stick to reputable suppliers that have been around for a while, you'll probably be fine. I've used Excel, Black Box, RS Online to name but a few for years, but there are plenty of others out there.

As I often say, to actually be cat whatever, the work needs to be done to the relevant installation stipulations and it needs to be tested with some very expensive test gear - there's more to it that just buying catX bits and bobs. But that's not to say it won't work for something like Gigabit ethernet which is well within the performance headroom of the cat5e and better standards. You have to do a spectacularly bad job for it to not work, poor termination is usually the biggest culprit and take care not to kink or crush the cable - in any corners it needs to be "curved" (min radius something like 4x the cable diameter) not "hammered" around any 90 degree bends.
 
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Munzz

Active Member
For permanently installed cable runs, one normally uses "solid core" (as opposed to "stranded" or "patch") cable terminated onto IDC type "punch down" blocks.

100m is a pretty standard size for "bulk" cabe, at that length it often comes supplied in a (cardboard) box (rather than a drum) albeit that the box design is supposed to prevent (perhaps "deter" would be a better term) chances of the cable snagging, coiling, kinking, etc. as you pull it out.

There are some snake oil salesmen out there that sell a form of cable called "Copper Clad Aluminium" (CCA) which isn't allowed in the proper "cat" standards (which mandate the use of pure copper conductors.) Some times they try and pass it off as "catX certified," "catX equivalent," "CatX tested" and other BS such as "made up" cats such as cat5a, cat6e, none of which exist at time of posting. Avoid such things, it performs less well and is outside standards. If the price looks too good to be true, it probably is.

If you stick to reputable suppliers that have been around for a while, you'll probably be fine. I've used Excel, Black Box, RS Online to name but a few for years, but there are plenty of others out there.

As I often say, to actually be cat whatever, the work needs to be done to the relevant installation stipulations and it needs to be tested with some very expensive test gear - there's more to it that just buying catX bits and bobs. But that's not to say it won't work for something like Gigabit ethernet which is well within the performance headroom of the cat5e and better standards. You have to do a spectacularly bad job for it to not work, poor termination is usually the biggest culprit and take care not to kink or crush the cable - in any corners it needs to be "curved" (min radius something like 4x the cable diameter) not "hammered" around any 90 degree bends.

Great response Mick, really appreciated.

I have been warned about the CCA product, will avoid.

This stuff is coming up cheapest, seller is reputable but it looks too cheap, am I missing something or does this look OK for what I'm after?

Cat6 UTP PVC Solid Cable (Reel) | Cat6 Cable
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I don't normally recommend product, but I've seen that brand (Connectix) used before by my subbies and Cable Monkey have been around for ages and I believe are fairly well regarded (not that I've ever used them.)
 

Munzz

Active Member
I don't normally recommend product, but I've seen that brand (Connectix) used before by my subbies and Cable Monkey have been around for ages and I believe are fairly well regarded (not that I've ever used them.)

Top man, really appreciate you taking your time out Mick to answer my questions. All the best.

Jamie
 

Mister_Tad

Well-known Member
I'd suggest FTP as opposed to UTP for doing DIY permanent installs. It's probably belt and braces, but you don't want to find out down the line that you're unable to negotiate at 10Gbit because you're running cable alongside AC power or the like.

The added cost is rather trivial, compared to the possibility of having to tear it out and reinstall at a later date.

And I have regrets about not running a pair of cables for a few of my longer/core runs, so may be worth considering.
 
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xxGBHxx

Well-known Member
I'd suggest FTP as opposed to UTP for doing DIY permanent installs. It's probably belt and braces, but you don't want to find out down the line that you're unable to negotiate at 10Gbit because you're running cable alongside AC power or the like.

The added cost is rather trivial, compared to the possibility of having to tear it out and reinstall at a later date.

And I have regrets about not running a pair of cables for a few of my longer/core runs, so may be worth considering.

HMmmmmmmmmmm

I thought that running STP/FTP if you don't properly ground everything and terminate into a fully compliant grounded patch panel worse than just going straight UTP?

Perhaps the advice I got on this very forum was wrong all those years ago...

G
 

Mister_Tad

Well-known Member
HMmmmmmmmmmm

I thought that running STP/FTP if you don't properly ground everything and terminate into a fully compliant grounded patch panel worse than just going straight UTP?

Perhaps the advice I got on this very forum was wrong all those years ago...

G

Hmm... could be, that sounds perfectly legitimate as well... perhaps warrants further research.

I went with a theory a while back that foiled=better for potentially noisy runs, confirmed it with a handful of searches and found seemingly legitimate references that backed up my theory and didn't look back. I do remember something about not mixing though.

The latest runs I'm installing are OM4, so that has knocked that debate on the head for me.
 
D

Deleted member 24354

Guest
If you are not familiar with terminating STP my advice is leave well alone. You can cause more problems if you don’t terminate it properly, than you are trying to solve. Stick with UTP, for domestic installs you will be fine as long as you don’t run your Cat6 and mains voltage cables together in parallel.
 

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