Cat5e living room

paul1967

Novice Member
Would you if you had the chance fit Cat5e in the living room ,if so where close to Tv or Telephone and what would use it for , and why not rely on wireless.
 

KoolVin

Novice Member
Would you if you had the chance fit Cat5e in the living room ,if so where close to Tv or Telephone and what would use it for , and why not rely on wireless.
Yes I would (and have) fitted Cat5e in my living room....and most other rooms in my house :D

The reason? Wireless signals aren't 100% reliable (interference from microwaves, etc) and the bandwidth available is not sufficient for my needs (54Mbps on 802.11g wasn't quick enough to stream HD feeds without some stuttering and 108Mbps with 802.11n had too many “drop-outs”), hence the reason for installing Cat5e and a gigabit switch.

As far as location is concerned I have only installed it for data requirements as all my telephones are DECT, but I have installed it where ever a PC may be located in future and also next to TV's/AV cabinets so that I'm prepared for any eventuality. I've even installed a small patch panel so that I can patch things through easily :thumbsup:

It's currently used to connect my server and NAS to everything else so that I can stream video, audio, etc. as well as allowing me to connect my Xbox 360, Xbox and PS2 to my LAN so I can play over the internet.

Of course I also have wireless for browsing the net with my laptop when I don't want to be tied to a desk.

Kev.

PS: Also note that wireless NIC's etc. cost a lot more on a case by case basis than installing cable before hand, so it can also be very cost effective!
 

vex

Novice Member
Yes, use it for PC, Telephone and future TV use.

Our installers even wire some next to the light switch for either audio systems or automation controls.

Basic rule of thumb I use, think of the number of points you need - then double up at every point.

Wireless, oh I love this question, has a lot of issues. Quickly they are based around noise and capacity. Nether of which is very good.

HTH

Chris
 

PaulDavidThomas

Active Member
I've just done my house and put nearly 1,000 meters of Cat5e in. Doubled up to most sockets (so I can do switched HDMI). It's also gone in with a full Clipsal system and lot's of speaker stuff (QED Modular) I will be happy if I don't have to route another Cat5e for a while... But it will be worth it. I will also drop a few Mac Airports for mobile use.
 

jasonf01

Active Member
Yes.

Besides the fact that my living room has had one (PC network) connection for 7 years, another was added for other wired equipment (CCTV and remote control) just 1 year later.

As vex says, double up your estimates because im hankering for video distribution via cat5 at some stage and im all out of installed cable.

Why Cat5?
Well at the moment my AV to the bedroom is a long run of unbalanced scart wire. The AV at the end is watchable, but a little unstable. When everything ends up hi-def, this cable will be pretty much obsolete, and by then with any luck (and if they havent already become available), I will be able to get a HDMI-Cat5 adapter and send a much better signal quality to the upstairs room(s).
Cat5 is also much cheaper than most other cables, usually easier to install (thinner, less succeptable to noise), and can be used for just about everything. To me, its the holy grail of home automation/integration infrastructure, although Id expect some expert to come out now and say otherwise :)

Jas.
 

ruru

Active Member
ditto . . .

You can NEVER have enough cable buried in the walls :D

When we built the present homestead, we went for one CAT5 point in the main rooms and used around 300 metres of cable.

The currently under-construction version has close to 1.5KM of cable in them there walls :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

R
 

hpoom

Active Member
OK, so say I wanted to wire my house with CAT5. How would I go about it? Should I place say 2-4 RJ45 panels in each room them wire them back to a central location? (say the 3rd bedroom or the cupboard under the stairs)

Were it is all wired to should I wire the cables ends into 12-24 RJ45 panels? Or could I just wire them into the back of a patch panel mounted on the wall?

I assum done correctly I could use a patch panel to either join some of the ports to a switch/hub for home networking, or use the patch panel to join ports arround the house for sending video and audio?

Does this make sence? would this work? Also how would to go about adding CAT5 into an old house?
 

mrmcdean

Novice Member
Also how would to go about adding CAT5 into an old house?
I was going to as a similar question, im looking at moving and would like to get some av systems in place, the wife has suggested getting the house re wired so im thinking why not do it at the same time (not in the same channels to avoid interferance - I assume this is an issue ?) but its an older house with solid walls so I dont know how much work it would take, would it be worth the hassle ??
 

pemberto

Active Member
If you are going to put Cat5/Cat5e or Cat6 cable in make sure that you use a good quality cable.

I have just finished doing a retro fit in nmy house, all rooms have a minimum of 2 Cat5e with the main rooms having 4 connections. All is run back to the loft into a patch panel and then a gigabit switch.

I used Blackbox as the supplier as they are a very large networking company, support has been great.

They are currently running a special on the cable if any one is looking, http://www.blackbox.co.uk/ukhome.asp?cs=dvh&id=3&bc=promo/bulkcable

Hope that helps,

Pemberto
 

hpoom

Active Member
Is the Cat5e cable from blackbox solid or stranded?
 

pemberto

Active Member
Is the Cat5e cable from blackbox solid or stranded?
All GigaBase 350 CAT5e, 350-MHz Bulk Cables have 24 AWG solid bare annealed copper conductors, a rip cord applied lengthwise under the jacket, various pairing lays, and sequential footage markings.

Have a look at the following datasheet on the cable - http://www.blackbox.co.uk/solutions/pdf/22732.pdf

The install is also matched to the BlackBox Gigabase product line. This includes the 24 port patch panel and all the wall plates, this is to ensure that is meets the 350Mhz spec of the cable.

Pemberto
 

vex

Novice Member
Basically you are right hpoom, all the individual cables will pull back to the same central location and be presented there in some form of patch panel.

You don't have to go for a full commercial sized patch panel system.

There are a number of different manufacturers that make domestic systems that can flush into the wall very neatly and in some cases actually look better than fuse boards.

Google and Check out

CRIS Box, aca-apex and Home Network Sciences as the leading manufacturers.

HTH

Chris
 

BruceH

Novice Member
When I created my cinema in the lounge, I ran 4 cat5e cables to the cinema equipment cabinet.

I only my Squeezebox MP3 player at the time, but I figured I would need more.

Now I have:

X-box360
AVR-4306 AV Receiver - networked
HTPC - PC
Squeezebox MP3 player.

So all 4 cables are now used.

Obviously I could but a switch or hub in there later if I needed more.

But it just goes to show you, that you can never have enough Cat5e !!

And that's without using any of it for carrying audio or video.
 

smjxm09

Novice Member
Say you had a 4 port ADSL router with all 4 ports wired out with cat 5 and one of those ports went to your AV rack. If later on you needed more outlets to that rack could you not plug in a small 4 port hub by the rack and use those additional ports. Would this not save having to run in new cable?
 

BruceH

Novice Member
That would work, as long as:

1) You only wanted to use the cable for ethernet, not control of IR, or for video transmission, or something else.
2) You were happy that you could get fast enough networking through the hub or switch, or whatever you planned to instal..
 

pjrouse

Active Member
Hi,

I've just moved into a place and it's being gutted and rewired and thought now's the best time to put in some CAT5 for networking.

Am I right in presuming CAT5 cannot be run alongside the electric cable or can it be run in conduit alongside or any there any guidelines etc to follow?

I can get hold of the cable and get the sparkys to run it when they rewire and then I'll do all the chasing out etc.

I'm just looking for some do's and dont's as Ive not done this before.

Also has anyone run speaker cable for surround under downstairs flooring? We've got concrete floors so I presume they would need channelling out and then some trunking run with the cable in then covering before laying the (laminate) floor on top?

Finally does anyone know of anywhere to get chrome/stainless face plates for network points - My wife will let me run cat5 but not if it's presented in nasty white plastic boxes next to the nice chrome/stainless sockets we have planned.

Thanks for any advice.

Paul
 

vex

Novice Member
Hi,

I've just moved into a place and it's being gutted and rewired and thought now's the best time to put in some CAT5 for networking.

Am I right in presuming CAT5 cannot be run alongside the electric cable or can it be run in conduit alongside or any there any guidelines etc to follow?
Industry rule is 5cm or 2" seperation and cross power at 90 degrees, no specific requirement for capping/conduit

Also has anyone run speaker cable for surround under downstairs flooring? We've got concrete floors so I presume they would need channelling out and then some trunking run with the cable in then covering before laying the (laminate) floor on top?
It might be better to round the walls rather than under the floor, easier to chase out and finish off

Finally does anyone know of anywhere to get chrome/stainless face plates for network points - My wife will let me run cat5 but not if it's presented in nasty white plastic boxes next to the nice chrome/stainless sockets we have planned.
Most manufacturers offer chrome finished 'euromod' plates and then you just buy modules to fit and present which ever cable you need.Your friendly local custom installer should be able to help or I believe there will be an ebay shop selling them soon.
 

baldrick

Novice Member
I wired our new house, at the hub end I have a 36-port coax patch panel, a 48 port Cat5 patch panel, 6 stereo speaker pair wall plates, a 5.1 multi-channel speaker wall plate, 4 stereo line level feeds, 2 component video sends and a component video return.



Each room has 4 cat5s and a pair of coaxes with a couple of rooms having more. All up it's about 1500m of cable. Thankfully the wire was bough and installed early last year as copper has increased in price by 70-80%!!!

Regarding chrome/steel plates G.E.T make them. Our reception rooms all use the screwless flat plates. You may find you need to get a G.E.T catalogue or go to your local electrical factor to ensure you get the stuff you want.

The good thing with cat5 is that when it's used for data only 2 of the 4 pairs are used so there is always redundancy in the cable. It's only when you want to send video/audio that you need all 4 pairs.

Personally I ran the proper cables to known locations and then cat 5 can do the rest. By this I mean that I used component video or analogue line cable when I knew that I wanted a specific device (Squeezebox, TV etc...).

For speaker cable I used 2.5mm T & E and it works perfectly.

My recommendation would be to label every cable clearly (especially at the hub end) and test them once they are in place. This is time consuming but saves you installing a cable, plastering it in only to find it doesn't work.

Where cables go through joists, studs and noggins use the steel plates that nail into the wood over the cables to protect them and get someone to help with spooling out and routing the cables!
 

pjrouse

Active Member
Industry rule is 5cm or 2" seperation and cross power at 90 degrees, no specific requirement for capping/conduit
Cool - Thanks


It might be better to round the walls rather than under the floor, easier to chase out and finish off
Round the walls? - You mean chase horizontally along the bottom edge of the wall (behind the skirting) ?? Good plan!

Most manufacturers offer chrome finished 'euromod' plates and then you just buy modules to fit and present which ever cable you need.Your friendly local custom installer should be able to help or I believe there will be an ebay shop selling them soon.
Thanks

Paul
 

pjrouse

Active Member
Where cables go through joists, studs and noggins use the steel plates that nail into the wood over the cables to protect them and get someone to help with spooling out and routing the cables!
Any pics as an example? - sorry you are talking to a TOTAL amateur :)

Paul
 

New Start Neil

Distinguished Member
I wired our new house, at the hub end I have a 36-port coax patch panel, a 48 port Cat5 patch panel, 6 stereo speaker pair wall plates, a 5.1 multi-channel speaker wall plate, 4 stereo line level feeds, 2 component video sends and a component video return.

Each room has 4 cat5s and a pair of coaxes with a couple of rooms having more. All up it's about 1500m of cable. Thankfully the wire was bough and installed early last year as copper has increased in price by 70-80%!!!

Regarding chrome/steel plates G.E.T make them. Our reception rooms all use the screwless flat plates. You may find you need to get a G.E.T catalogue or go to your local electrical factor to ensure you get the stuff you want.

The good thing with cat5 is that when it's used for data only 2 of the 4 pairs are used so there is always redundancy in the cable. It's only when you want to send video/audio that you need all 4 pairs.

Personally I ran the proper cables to known locations and then cat 5 can do the rest. By this I mean that I used component video or analogue line cable when I knew that I wanted a specific device (Squeezebox, TV etc...).

For speaker cable I used 2.5mm T & E and it works perfectly.

My recommendation would be to label every cable clearly (especially at the hub end) and test them once they are in place. This is time consuming but saves you installing a cable, plastering it in only to find it doesn't work.

Where cables go through joists, studs and noggins use the steel plates that nail into the wood over the cables to protect them and get someone to help with spooling out and routing the cables!
Do you do private work!? :D :smashin:
 

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