Cat5 Cabling

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by sampsonkieran1, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. sampsonkieran1

    sampsonkieran1
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    Hi All

    Not sure if this is the correct forum or if anyone can help.

    We bought our new house a few years ago and we recall being told that it had cat5 cabling throughout. Given, that, at the time it wasn't high on our priority list we didn't give it a second thought.

    Now, a few years on we're wondering whether we could make use of it somehow, if indeed we have got it.

    Firstly what is cat5 cabling and what are it's benefits?

    How would I know whether I've got cat5 cabling or not?

    If I've got a smart TV downstairs with Sky HD+ and Blu-ray players, am I able to watch sky channels, or dvds etc in other rooms?

    Apologies if these are all very obvious questions.
    Many thanks.
     
  2. next010

    next010
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    Cat5 networking cable (also known as ethernet) is for creating a computer network. Wired ethernet is much faster and more reliable than wireless networking.

    If you have what looks like large telephone sockets in the walls then that is very likely cat5 sockets.

    The smart TV and Blu-ray players could be plugged into it, if you have already set them up on wireless it's the same function just on a more stable/faster link.

    It is possible in some cases to use HDMI extenders over ethernet, like this device you can plug into a Sky box and use in another room, anything more advanced than they would likely get very expensive.

    DVD's would be better served via a central server like a PC and then streaming over the network to clients be it the media player built into a smart TV or purchasing a dedicated one to plug into TV.
     
  3. sampsonkieran1

    sampsonkieran1
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    Many thanks for the reply. It does look as if we've got cat5, ie there are large telephone sockets in all rooms.

    Does that mean that if I plug my Blu-ray player into the downstairs one that I should be able to tune my bedroom tv into and watch a film there?

    It doesn't sound as if it's that easy to get sky in other rooms. I guess one option would be to use Sky Go on the laptop and then use the Cat5 cabling to get it on a smart tv in another room - the problem then being changing channels.

    When you say "DVD's would be better served via a central server like a PC and then streaming over the network to clients". How do you get the dvds onto a central server or are you talking about electronic storage of DVDs rather than ripping them to hard drives?
     
  4. next010

    next010
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    No not without that device I linked to.

    Correct, some HDMI over ethernet solutions may come with IR blasters which repeat the IR signal to the original set top box.

    Ripping to hard drive, there are multiple ways to go about this depending upon you want just the main movie or the full disc with menus.

    For example Plex offers a jukebox interface with automatic scanning of media providing coverart & metadata. There are multiple Plex clients for a number of platforms including Samsung Blu-ray players and TV's. A Panasonic client is in the works but you can buy various boxes that have Plex clients like Roku.

    By ripping the DVD's to the hard drive using MakeMKV this will give you the same quality videos thats on the disc (makemkv extracts video and does not convert), then you feed your folder full of movies into Plex media server running on a PC or NAS, Plex clients connect to the Plex server (automatically) and can browse the media library and play media.
     

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