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CAT5 cable weatherproof?

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by Flipper, Nov 27, 2003.

  1. Flipper

    Flipper
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    Anyone know if CAT5 cable is weatherproof? I want to put
    together a small network but I need to run the cables on outside walls.

    So ideally I need black or brown cable but the searches I have done show just about everything but these colours.

    Cheers,

    Mike.
     
  2. nathsea

    nathsea
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  3. Flipper

    Flipper
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    Cheers nathsea
     
  4. agendrano

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    I believe that Cat 5 are not weatherproof. Every time I have some network cables done outside of our company's buildings, the contractor always use conduits.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. Kronenbourg

    Kronenbourg
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    I have had a length of cat5 cable running round the outside of my house for over a year now without any problems. The reason for using conduit is for extra protection. If something happens the that damages that piece of cable, where it is on the outside they cant just chop out a section and re-join it.

    What you may want to consider though is a Wireless network. You can get a wireless hub and a couple of cards for around 100 quid these days and it saves you the hassle of trying to wire up the network and also means you can move your PC's anywhere without worrying about where your cable goes to.
     
  6. Flipper

    Flipper
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    Kronenbourg,

    I liked the ideas of a wireless network but I was put off by
    the security issues , WEP etc...
    As I am a network novice I thought dealing with bits of wire would be easier than grappling with security configs etc...

    Mike.
     
  7. tonyb

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    Wireless networks are not that tricky to install. Basically, all you need to do is configure the SSID (the network name). If you want to use WEP, you set that up on the router.

    Specifying the WEP encryption is usually as simple as entering a word of your choice, and the router will then generate an encrypted version of the word. Write that down and when your wireless network cards connect you will be prompted for the encrypted password.

    Given the current cold weather I'd say that spending an hour or so in the warm setting up a wireless network is much better than spending two hours going up and down ladders in the cold!!

    Go for some linksys wireless kit.....

    Tony
     
  8. Flipper

    Flipper
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    Tony,

    It was Linksys that started me on this - I was thinking about getting the Linksys WMA11B Media Adapter, hence the need for some sort of network.

    I was quite happy with wireless until I read thorugh one of their user guides. It all started to sound a bit complex.

    I'll have another read and see if makes any more sense.

    Mike.
     
  9. tonyb

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    Flipper,

    I've posted a short guide to setting up a wireless network using Linksys kit in the Computer Hardware & Home Cinema PC forum.

    You can view that http://www.avforums.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=103351]here[/URL]

    Have a read through of that, and take a look at the user manual of the router you want to buy and you'll see that it really isn't that difficult to do.

    Hope this helps,
    Tony
     
  10. Flipper

    Flipper
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    Cheers Tony.
     
  11. Jason S

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    Flipper,
    I ran a 25m cable from my ground floor study under the front lawn to my garage and used water pipe to protect it. The pipe costs about £10 for 20-25 metres (Wickes) and the RJ45 plugs slide right on through.

    Seal both ends with bathroom sealant and you'll probably only end up with a few inches of exposed cable running up the side of the house and into the wall.

    Neighbours thought I was a bit crazy at the time, until they saw all the gear I was re-homing into the garage.

    Hardest part of the job was digging the trench....
     
  12. tonyb

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    That Wickes conduit is really good stuff for the money. I used it to run power out to our shed. It's definitely a good way of giving some protection to cabling, and it looks neater than bits of wire hanging down!

    If anyone is thinking about using this for running CAT5 I'd suggest that you run one or two additional cables through it for future expansion, as the diameter of the conduit is about 20mm, and CAT5 cable is fairly cheap to buy - I bought 100 for £15 from maplin. You should be able to get a 305metre drum of cable for about £65, though I've seen it at computer fairs for £40.

    Tony
     
  13. Kristian

    Kristian
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    Hi there,

    We use an external cabling company for any Cat5 runs and I've asked this question before about weather proofing. I was told that the cable sheath is not water proof and would allow the ingress of water eventually - the amount of time was not specified but I suspect years rather than weeks. Suffice to say anytime we have long cable runs outside a building we use fibre. Short runs will manage with conduit.

    You can buy small diameter trunking cheaply enough so I would use some of this. I have seen some 20mm, or 30mm, black plastic tubing thats concerteenered (sp?!) (like the bend in a straw) that wouldn't look too out of place on the side of the building. It was called Copex.

    As advised above, run some extra lengths at the same time because you never know when you'll need the extra!

    Hope that helps.

    Kris.
     

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