Capabilities of Macro Lens

Dancook

Distinguished Member
There's a Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG Macro for £225 in the ads, not that I want to spend that much - but it would be nice to have a Macro; I enjoyed having a play with Macro lens before and I know I would end up buying one eventually.

Since it's a 105mm lens, how does it differ from a 'normal' prime lens of around 105mm?

Could I use the macro for taking 'portrait' shots of animals at a zoo for example?

What couldn't I do with a macro that a normal lens of the same length would?

Cheers, Dan
 

twist

Distinguished Member
Its macro so can get muuuuch closer to the subject. Can use it for portraits BUT AF on that lens is slow, I had one. Great for macro & very sharp.

A normal prime will have much faster AF. Different lenses have different uses.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
Its macro so can get muuuuch closer to the subject. Can use it for portraits BUT AF on that lens is slow, I had one. Great for macro & very sharp.

A normal prime will have much faster AF. Different lenses have different uses.

Since i have a 30mm prime, If I were to get a 105mm macro I'm guessing it will be fine for slow moving animal portrait shots :) no flying birds etc.. just like grooming monkeys.

I love monkeys:)
 

twist

Distinguished Member
Maybe if the animals dead youll be able to AF it. Pretty easy to MF the lens though. Another option is the Tamron 90mm supposed to be quicker at AF and a great lens.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
A 60mm macro would probably be better if you were into portraits and macro.

I'm ok for human portraits and normal shots - but I was looking for zoomed portraits where I can't get close enough - like the zoo. And macro.

they didn't need to be in one lens, but it might help me justify a macro lens.
 
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twist

Distinguished Member
Better off with a fast zoom for stuff like that 70-200 2.8, 80-200 2.8, 100-300 f4 to name a few. Problem is you want to do quite a bit with a prime. better off with a excellent zoom, problem is kaching.
 

Dancook

Distinguished Member
Better off with a fast zoom for stuff like that 70-200 2.8, 80-200 2.8, 100-300 f4 to name a few. Problem is you want to do quite a bit with a prime. better off with a excellent zoom, problem is kaching.

Well I want the Macro foremost - just I was reluctant to buy one now - except that around £200 seemed a good price for the sigma.

Only curious as to what else I could do with it to convince myself..:)
 

Yandros

Well-known Member
The Nikon 105VR macro is my favourite zoo lens.

Very good for monkeys actually!

60mm might be fine for human portraits, but remember most monkeys are smaller and further away.

tamarind-borders-small.jpg


marmoset1-borders.jpg


AF can be a bit sluggish though, but the shallow DOF and better low light capabilities compared to a bog standard zoom at 105mm more than make up for it.
 

HelloMoto

Active Member
The slow AF on the macro would make me hesitate using it for small animals like monkeys etc. It is sharp when it clicks though, sometimes too sharp and harsh for portraits of people I find which is why I use the Nikon 135mm f/2 or the 70-200mm.
 

shotokan101

Banned
Doesn't the Siggie have a focus limit switch to help focussing speed in "non-macro" situations ?

Jim
 

RobDickinson

Well-known Member
90-100mm macro lenses make excellent portrait lenses and are usually very sharp wide open.

The siggy is ace. Have a look at the siggy 70mm f2.8 macro too, the sharpest lens ever (at least a contender!).

Note the magnification with all of these macro lenses at 1:1 is the same, with longer focal lengths you just get 1:1 at from further away.
 

blasted

Well-known Member
I just got a canon 100mm f2.8 for £295, only had chance to have a quick play but the USM autofocus is very fast. For macro it might hunt around a bit due to the shallow depth of field but I’m sure its enough for stuff further away. I was in the same boat; I couldn't justify that money for purely macro. The good thing about the canon is its internal focussing. So far so happy, but I did only get it yesterday.
 

RobDickinson

Well-known Member
7D has a whizzy supersampling AF mode for macro (for canon USM macro lenses). Havnt tried it doesnt work with my tamron.
 
A 60mm macro would probably be better if you were into portraits and macro.


60mm you need to be tooooo close to object to focus (fine for plants), well if you taking pictures of insects you need at least 105mm to keep the distance (not to scare them off) but it's only my opinion :)
 

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