Can't find a DLP Home Cinema SVGA Projector to fit my required specs

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by chen lung, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. chen lung

    chen lung
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    OK guys :).

    I'm basically one of those guys who loves the specs of the CRT projector, but if I can't have that (due to general physical barriers), then the next closest thing for a Home Cinema projector (gaming/DVDs) is gonna have to be a DLP.

    Now, my intentions is to get a 800x600 SVGA one. HD isn't my thing at the moment, the rubbish encoding methods and some of the half-arsed releases don't blow my skirt up either.

    Although upconversion is going to take place (from 720x480/576). My friend says it is good none-the-less. However, I want to make the most of it by involving the following processes:

    1) Powerstrip compatibility (1:1 scaling so I can maintain the resolution of my source, within the 800x600 resolution).
    2) Attachable anamorphic lens (would be willing to buy it seperately - even if it is mighty expensive).
    3) Component RGB sockets (the only reasonably cheap way to have a progressive PS2 - using Blaze CD).
    4) Possible 72/75HZ playback (if any digital PJ will do it properly, and not falsely), but I could live with the minimum of 50/60HZ.
    5) Input for my main source: the PC.

    I'll use WinDVD to play DVDs and I'll hook up those 7.1 speakers (the cheapo ones from Creative or something) too. Everything will go through the Windows PC, except the PS2 (I want to use the same set of speakers for it, too).

    My only problem is finding the projector that will do those things. Hell it's getting harder to even find dedicated HC PJs that are 800x600, let alone with those requirements.

    That's kind of it, but I'll probably add more stuff soon as the time comes along. It was just so you get a rough idea of what I'm after :).

    Thank you!
     
  2. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker
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    Most 800 x 600 projectors are data projectors, and will not have anything like the CRT type contrast and black level you may like. DLP has the best simultaneous and ANSI contrast capability, but the Sony HS60 has a better overall black level for the same white level, so you may want to look at one of those too (black levels closer to CRT). If that's what you're after though, you can get an older (7 years old) Davis DLS8 or similar for next to nothing since they are quite low tech compared to newer models but will do 72hz and 75hz since they have single speed colour wheels (£100 or there abouts if you can find one).

    As you're using an HTPC, you won't need to worry about the scaling or deinterlacing capabilities of the pj, but a DLP data pj may have a white segment to boost brightness and that's not necessarily a good thing for colour rendition.

    If you want to use an anamorphic lens to convert 4:3 to 16:9, you'll be better off getting a 16:9 pj and using the lens to convert it 2.35:1. In that case, why not get a new 1280 x 720 (or 768) pj with a warranty and use that? The higher pixel count will mean less screen door from the same seating distance compared to an 800 x 600 model. You may want to use an ND filter to dim the image down to levels more like a CRT, unless you want to have a big screen.

    What's your budget?

    Gary
     
  3. chen lung

    chen lung
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    For the PJ, maybe £600 or something max. Could be workable ;).

    Hmm, interesting... That would explain there being more data PJs than Home Cinema. The Contrast and brightness e.t.c of a data one wouldn't be suitable for HC - as you've more-or-less pointed out :).

    Unfortunately, this appears to be an LCD one :(. It's a shame the Davis one is quite old and OOP. My friend recommended DLP as it's more film like, this screen doesn't seem to be as flawed as LCD in general either.

    I've only heard of a few DVDs are 2:35:1 squished into 4:3 (Dance of the Drunk Mantis - Soulblade), it's not what I'm after and wouldn't that method only lead to distortion? I want a 4:3 (800x600 resolution) ratio as it's the closest to the 'default' of SD DVDs (5:4 for NTSC and 4:3 for PAL), it would serve the anamorphic in the best way too by simply adding the 16:9 lens where applicable :).

    The problem with that is the upconversion (especially for stuff that won't be going through my PC - the PS2 for example), I won't be able to get anamorphic with 'normal' SD DVDs and 4:3 ratio DVDs would be a bit of a problem too. I've also seen it in action and it doesn't look bad to my eyes :).

    My friend said Powerstrip may not work with certain projectors when using the HTPC method, so that's why I was asking about it :).


    When I talk about liking CRT, I meant it being flexable with no need for deinterlacing or scaling, pretty straightforward. The levels of colour don't have to be the exact same, but it would be nice to have something close :). Sorry I didn't make that clear.

    (BTW, thanks for taking the time to help!)
     
  4. Peter Parker

    Peter Parker
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    I only suggested the HS60 because it is the pj that is closest to being able to approach the black level of CRT in a reasonable price range (unless you use an ND8 filter or 2 to dim it right down). DLP has better intra scene blacks but the LCD is still better than the CRT in that respect. You'll have to see them in action to be able to make your own mind up, so you need a demo or two with some properly set up models. I also prefer DLP and probably for the same reasons your friend does, but I wouldn't dismiss others until I'd seen them.

    Most DVDs are anamorphic, so will work with a lens to stretch the image optically. With a non 1024 x 576 pj, some scaling will have to occur anyway to make the source fit (even then scaling 720 to 1024 has to occur). The advantage of scope is that just like a true cinema, 16:9 is less wide than cinemascope. Adding a lens will add some distortion, but it's exactly the same as they do in the cinema and you won't notice it with movie content. Scaling to remove the bars is different pf course, but then so is scaling a 720 x 576 image to any other resolution.

    For a scope screen, you'll use the HTPC to stretch the image taller to lose the black bars, and use the lens to get the aspect ratio correct again. For 4:3 or 16:9 (depending on the ratio of the pj), you can remove the lens and pillarbox the sides and use curtains for masking.

    Why do you want to use a lens? Other than scope screens, you don't really need them these days since you can get 16:9 pjs, and that would be cheaper than adding a lens since they cost as much or more than the pj.

    Many of use here use a 720 pj and have no problems with anamorphic widescreen DVDs. You can pillarbox 4:3 stuff in most widescreen pjs these days so it shouldn't be a problem either.

    Most modern graphics cards have most resolutions, including 1280 x 720 so you shouldn't have to use powerstrip unless you want a specific frequency, and that's where the pj may have problems.

    Gary
     
  5. AV Nik

    AV Nik
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    Have a look at the Optoma EP range.
    One for every occasion... i believe.
     

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