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Can't delete photos (crazy)

toddy28

Well-known Member
Just moved a load of photo albums to my iPad and was going to sort out the ones I wanted to keep on the iPad only to find out that you can't delete them :eek: the only folder you can is in the saved photos.

Bit of a slip up from apple, hope this is sorted in an update I was going to take my iPad on holiday to sort out my photos in the evenings
 

Warnie

Active Member
Just moved a load of photo albums to my iPad and was going to sort out the ones I wanted to keep on the iPad only to find out that you can't delete them :eek: the only folder you can is in the saved photos.

Bit of a slip up from apple, hope this is sorted in an update I was going to take my iPad on holiday to sort out my photos in the evenings

I might be totally wrong but can you take out the ones you don't want in the folder you are using to sync the ipad - then do a sync and the pics should go? taking itunes on holiday might be a problem though!
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
Agreed, the photo app needs a LOT of work doing to it.
Yes, you can view photo's but that's about it.

I don't see why it would be so bad to be able to do a small bit of sorting out on the iPad without having to yet again dock it to a computer to do things on.

This is one of the things they need to address over time. Making the iPad more independent.
 

toddy28

Well-known Member
I might be totally wrong but can you take out the ones you don't want in the folder you are using to sync the ipad - then do a sync and the pics should go? taking itunes on holiday might be a problem though!

You are totally correct but the iPad should do it and it's just a bit of a pain in the arse to sort out special folders for the iPad on my pc and sync it
 
D

Deleted member 27989

Guest
It wouldn't be a pain if you were to use a management application like PSE....Hardly anyone in the Mac world uses folders which is so last century...Meta data and automated albums or lists is the way to do it....For example I use, which works for me, two main smart albums one with all photo's that are 4 or 5 star rated, and another that has everything I've loaded on my pc in the last 2 months (some might be rated and it is clever enough not to have two copies)....

Then with faces and geo tags it also produces automatically a few more options...No need to faf about with manual folders etc....

Ability to update meta data, like with ratings against iTunes songs, would be great...
 

bpsmith

Distinguished Member
Fair point, but I think the OP wants to be able to upload his photo's from his camera and then sort the wheat from the chaff whilst actually on holiday and away from their Mac?

Your way is superior to folder for sure, but not suitable in this situation.
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
It wouldn't be a pain if you were to use a management application like PSE....Hardly anyone in the Mac world uses folders which is so last century...Meta data and automated albums or lists is the way to do it....For example I use, which works for me, two main smart albums one with all photo's that are 4 or 5 star rated, and another that has everything I've loaded on my pc in the last 2 months (some might be rated and it is clever enough not to have two copies)....

Then with faces and geo tags it also produces automatically a few more options...No need to faf about with manual folders etc....

Ability to update meta data, like with ratings against iTunes songs, would be great...

I'm guessing here a bit, but is this how the Mac and iPhoto type stuff works?

The Mac does actually upload files into folders on it's drive and the folders are based on the date you upload them onto the mac (or the date the photo's were taken perhaps?)

Folders and Drives, may seem a bit "techy" for some mac users who don't wish to be presented with actual raw files and folders on a hard drive.

So, the Mac puts a nice interface to use instead of this.

Then (using iPhone) there is a giant database file which links all the actual files on the drive to the date you input or is pulled from the EXIF info in each file. As you build up face recognition and enter the names of events, also this database is added to, which links the real files in real folders on the macs hard drive, with the most "customer friendly" interface on screen.

I'm totally guessing here, but is this how it actually works?
 
D

Deleted member 27989

Guest
Yup along those lines. And on a pc something like Photoshop elements and lightroom do similar things on a pc and can also hook into iTunes.

On a mac it goes one step further as the system gets hooked into a layer of the operating system and thus make the photos, albums, faces, locations available in any application without the need to know where they are nor to open iphoto or aperture. In addition if you prefer raw photos like me there is no need to convert nor export. This gets done automatically, for example the ones for an iPhone are smaller that on my iPad. You can do it yourself but why you would want to unless you are a professional needing to upload a 50Mb stock photo is beyond me ;-)

Oh any ofcourse with time machine you get instant backups and restores as well.

And unlike popular belief there is no say proprietary format, as you rightfully deducted, all the photos are in a normal folder structure together with XML files providing info regarding meta data and adjustments done. It just looks like a single database since it uses a package feature which makes a whole folder stricture look like a file with the aim that a user doesn't go messing about in it.
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
Yup along those lines. And on a pc something like Photoshop elements and lightroom do similar things on a pc and can also hook into iTunes.

On a mac it goes one step further as the system gets hooked into a layer of the operating system and thus make the photos, albums, faces, locations available in any application without the need to know where they are nor to open iphoto or aperture. In addition if you prefer raw photos like me there is no need to convert nor export. This gets done automatically, for example the ones for an iPhone are smaller that on my iPad. You can do it yourself but why you would want to unless you are a professional needing to upload a 50Mb stock photo is beyond me ;-)

Oh any ofcourse with time machine you get instant backups and restores as well.

And unlike popular belief there is no say proprietary format, as you rightfully deducted, all the photos are in a normal folder structure together with XML files providing info regarding meta data and adjustments done. It just looks like a single database since it uses a package feature which makes a whole folder stricture look like a file with the aim that a user doesn't go messing about in it.

Thanks for that.

I was not a million miles off on my guess then :)

I must admit, I'm a bit split with my feelings of doing things this way.

The older part of me hates it. I like to have my C: Drive, my "Photo's" Directory (even though they are now referred to as folders)

In my real "Photo's" directory I make sub directories, of say a subject, then under that perhaps further sub directories of dates

So, we may end up with:

C:\Photo's\Max the Cat\10-6-2010\laying on grass.jpg
C:\Photo's\Max the Cat\10-6-2010\waiting for food.jpg
C:\Photo's\Max the Cat\10-6-2010\asleep on bed.jpg

To me (or rather the old me!) that feels like a real and physical way of doing things, no fuss, it's just there.

Now, I can see that in reality, I don't actually NEED to myself sort things this way. I could use some photo/OS do this sorting for me (as happens on the Mac)

I can see it has advantages, and more user friendly. I suppose I have this concern that I don't really know what's happening, where things are, and what happens if it all goes wrong.

The Database that links everything together getting corrupted.

I feel a little split between the old (you know where things really are) method which I still currently do, and the let the computer deal with all that side of things new method.

Part of my problem I think may be the manner in which I generally take photo's.

If you go out for the day, and take your camera. you can class this as an event, with or without people, and I can see how this works well.

Whilst I do have those sort of photo events, many more are what I'd call random photo's.

A fox on the lawn, take a few photo's, cat on the bed, Close up of a model, nice sunset. Just 1 off photo's of all different things, shot at different times, and perhaps not uploaded onto a computer till a few days later.

Most of these would be shot with my DSLR in RAW format, so I will pick the nicest ones (generally take more than 1 thing of each subject) and in photoshop, crop and tweak the image, before saving it out as a jpg file. Also keeping the original RAW file if I ever need to go back the the original.

I have just learned that going this (photoshop) strips out all the EXIF info from the original photo.

My normal method (as I explained above) it to give it a relevant filename, and place it in a relevant folder with a date on it.

I really have no idea how a mac and it's iphoto/database method of handling photo's deals with this type of usage of photo's.

I accept this may not fall into the "typical way people take photo's" but it's what I tend to do.

Perhaps someone else does lots of 1 off RAW shots and photoshop tweaks and can explain to me (on their mac) how they actually deal with this?
 
D

Deleted member 27989

Guest
Yep I do a lot of those as well...My general workflow is:

1. Shoot everything in RAW (NEF in my case)
2. Pop CF in reader, and use disk-utility to make an image copy - my NEGATIVES
3. Move image copy to redudant disk array and make backup on my second array ;-)
4. Then open Apple Aperture and mount the image file from first array
5. Import photo's and ensure general tags like copyright and if applicable general description
6. All imported photos go generally into a big 'To Process' queue, if there was a very specific event like my recent cousins wedding I import them directly into the specific project within Aperture.
7. Then I tend to do a first pass in the To Process queue on one or more images, set things like initial rating, weed out badly out of focus.
8. Then I try and apply meta data, faces and place is easy, other stuff I either use the EXIF stock photography stands and more regurlar stuff I've got other names...For example Lions in the Snow in my mind (and this is personal stuff) have two topics, the Lions and for that I pick the keywords (or on a PC they are called tags I think) like Lions is underneath Wild Life in my structure...But then I also have Snow which is under a Seasons structure.
9. Basic meta data is applied and then I could start, but generally only do that for 4 or higher star rating (as I take a lot of snaps), some basic adjustments. It is important to do the meta data before, such that the versions all have the same meta data since if you do it in an edited version the original doesn't necessarily get it as well....I love Aperture since all adjusts are stored in XML files in multiple versions, so no duplicates of the photo, no need for a JPG ...It is always that RAW file, and doesn't become something else until export it and then it applies those settings automatically to the end result...

So yes, I think it would work absolutely perfect with just random pictures....And it is so easy since I never have to remember a name....I can search by date, or in this case I could also do a simple query like show me all photos with animals in the snow ;-) Or tighten it to lions...Or just all photos taken on that day, or in this date range...

I think you get the idea...Very flexible and very easy to maintain...Backups are you friend though....But like with TimeMachine that is fully automatic and easy to restore a single photo if you've made a mistake....And then I keep all my negatives like rolls of film, so in that sense I am like you I do like to keep my 'old' ways...
 

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