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Canon MV830i - thoughts

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by dillspooch, Jul 18, 2005.

  1. dillspooch

    dillspooch
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    I'd like to get a reasonably well featured Digital Camcorder and saw a Canon MV830i that looks like it could be good for what I'm looking for. I saw one in Comet for £350. I don't know much about camcorders so would appreciate some advice.

    The features say it does 16:9, DV-IN, DV-OUT, AV-IN. 20x optical zoom

    Questions:
    1/ I don't know if it can correct shaky hands. Does anyone know? If it can, does it apply when in 16:9 as well as 4:3? My old Hi8 would only do that in 4:3
    2/ I want to transfer my old Hi8 recordings to a PC. Is that what the AV-IN is for? I looked at the input on the camera and it doesn't look anything like an S-video input. Does it need an adapter?
    3/ What's the battery life like? I'll be in europe for two weeks. Will I need to charge it up frequently?
    4/ I've heard of widescreen and true-widescreen. Need I worry?
    5/ Is there anything better for a similar price? I can go up to £450.


    Thanks for any opinions.
    Mike
     
  2. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    Before buying a Canon camcorder I strongly recommend you have a read of This thread as there are a few 'known' problems with Canon camcorders! :rolleyes:

    1. Most of the well known makers of DV camcorders include some form of image stabalisation. Just make sure it is listed in the specs. Optical will give better results than digital stabalisation.
    2. AV-in is the feature that you need to be able to connect any analogue device to the camcorder to then capture the video to a PC. Most camcorders have a specific connector for the AV connections, but the converter lead is normally supplied with the cam.
    3. The life of the supplied battery is likely to be very poor and a spare higher powered battery is really needed, especially if going on holiday. On my cam the supplied battery is only ever used as a spare due to its poor life.
    4. Don't worry, these are normally just different terms used by different makes of camcorder.
    5. IMO Sony & Panasonic make the best camcorders

    Mark.
     
  3. dillspooch

    dillspooch
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    Thanks the information Mark, and your recommendations.
    Mike
     
  4. dillspooch

    dillspooch
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    I had a look at the Sony and Panasonic range. I found two that seem to fit the bill...

    Sony DCR-HC42E
    Panasonic NVGS250B

    The Panasonics only seem to do S-video in (so I can connect a Hi8 camcorder and pass through) on their high end cameras which are £800+.
    Looks the the Sony for me (£430 ish). Is this a good choice? It's much more reasonably priced than the Panasonic
     
  5. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    I strongly suggest you go and actually play with the camcorders you are looking at. You may find that one is so much more comfortable in your hands than the other, and therefore more likely to get used. Jessops are a good bet as they offer a 30 day money back guarentee and will also price match a UK web site.

    I think the connection on the Panasonics is a proprietary connection with a dedicated, supplied lead that has all the AV connection on it. On the Sony cams they have a jack socket for composite & stereo audio, but also a dedicated S-Video socket.

    Mark.
     
  6. laser

    laser
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    Hi

    Check this review site out:

    http://www.dvspot.com/reviews/cameraList.php

    It is American but the reviews are excellent and will give you a good idea of what is available from most manufacturers. Not all the cameras have a detailed review but there are plenty to checkout with exampels of captured footage and sound.

    One thing I have encountered with Canon camcorders at the entry and mid range level is the amount of noise they pick up from the mechanics. In quiet footage the camera noise is quite distracting......

    After much deliberation I have just bought a Sony HC42E rather than the Panasonic 250B. Reasons......

    The Sony records in true widescreen, using a larger CCD. This really makes a difference on a plasma or large widewcreen TV. Low level light performance is miles better on the Sony than the Panasonic although the Panasonic is very good in normal light situations.

    I picked the Sony HC42E up for £385.00 from www.ebuyer.co.uk
     
  7. dillspooch

    dillspooch
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    Thanks to you both for the info.

    I think the the Sony DCRHC42E looks like a better bet too. I like the panasonic but it's just too pricey and the Sony does everything I'd need. We have a local Jessops here so I'll give them a try shortly.

    Cheers
    Mike
     

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