Canon HG20 white balance issues

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by lithdoc, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. lithdoc

    lithdoc
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    Hello everyone!

    So I got my new long awaited canon HG20. Everything is fine, but I seem to be unable to get correct white balance while watching videos on the computer.

    While videos look great and vibrant on the camcorder's LCD, when transfered onto my laptop, they look grayish and washed out.

    At first I used FFDshow codec, then tried coreAVC codec, however, the results were quite similar.

    Is there anyone else with such problems? What could I do to solve it? Thanks!
     
  2. senu

    senu
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    If they look Ok on the LCD .. you have to be careful.. It might be the PC display that needs adjusting
    How does it look in editing software preview?
    Ad does it look like this in all media players?
    I would expect WB problems in dimly or artificially lit scenes but not in normal daylight
    Unless the WB setting are not on auto
     
  3. lithdoc

    lithdoc
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    Thanks for the quick reply.

    My computer screen seems to be fine - its a 1080p ultra bright view laptop screen and color are beautiful when I look at pictures taken with my SLR.

    Indeed, it was an artificially lit scene using two 500 watt lamps. I set the setting for tungsten, and it seemed to be okay on the LCD screen. The background what white, just like in real life. However, when viewed on the computer it was all gray.

    True, the colors are a bit different. Everything is much blander when looked at using Media Player Classic versus using Windows Media Player. However, using Pinnacle Studio everything is grayish as well.

    I just don't know what to do, since doing white balance while editing seems to screw everything up.
     
  4. chrishull3

    chrishull3
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    This is why i have a hd lcd beside the pc to watch the video as it is being captured,small 19" can be purchased for a song now.but with avchd this no help i know but the film can still be watched before uploading. i dont know why the awb would not work on your cam i get no problems but have a different model and the hv20 has been getting good reports ,but if the picture looks good on a monitor why it does not after capture upload seems very strange but do they still look bland after edit.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2009
  5. A n d r e w

    A n d r e w
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    Assuming you're using the auto white-balance setting, bear in mind that AWB takes time to respond to and correct for the ambient lighting. When you fire the camera up it will (probably) default to the conditions the camcorder was presented with last time you used it, or a factory default which may be way off the mark. If the lighting differs from that previous occasion (or the factory preset), AWB will do its best to compensate, but won't necessarily have done so before you're ready to fire off some clips.

    This response time can be worse when there's not much light around. As Senu has mentioned, results with AWB are more variable indoors or in similar "low light" situations: if there's not plenty of light about, the white balance sensor is easily confused. "Low light" covers situations when you've got all your lights switched on indoors, too - your eye compensates far, far more accurately and quickly (not to mention forgivingly) than a white balance sensor. Shooting video using normal artificial lighting indoors often produces video with poor colour (skewed white point and poor saturation) and low contrast.

    An alternative is to use your camcorder's manual white balance mode (see the instruction manual). Again, this won't guarantee perfect results in low light situations.

    The problem with adjusting the white point while editing is twofold. First, every new scene will have its own colour temperature. Secondly, if you use AWB and the camcorder adjusts the white balance between shots in the same scene or, worse, during a shot, then you've really got your work cut out.
     

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