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Canon G1X mk1-------Canon G16

daviduk

Active Member
.............CANON G1X mk1...............CANON G16..........

I have pretty much decided its one of these two but am open to other similar options .

Small enough to be carried around ,but nowhere the size of a DSLR is the main requirement but still maintaining a good picture quality.

To the two above are the "to me" largest of the "compact cameras" I do like a view finder

Which one of the two would be the best buy, Size ,weight ect.

My current cameras are an iPhone 4s and a Samsung S1065
The best that can be said about this camera is , its OK but pq is not as good as I want.
 

BT Bob

Distinguished Member
Have you played with them? The G1X is quite a bit bullied than the G16.

I owned a G1x, and much of the time it's superb. But - it has a terrible close-focussing ability, and the lens does encroach considerably into the viewfinder's FOV.

I sold mine a bought the G16. More portable and convenient (truly pocketable, unlike the G1X, IMO) and the pictures are really good for what I want.
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
The Sony RX100 series and Canon G7X come to mind - both offer 1in sensors which aren't quite as large as the G1X sensor but not far behind and far bigger than the G16's sensor plus the RX100/G7X are genuinely small enough to fit in a pocket. The RX100 Mk3 and mk4 both feature an EVF although they're pricier than the mk1 and mk2.

Another alternative is the Panasonic LX100 which has a similar sensor to the G1X, it's bigger than the RX100's but fairly compact for the sensor size.

John
 

daviduk

Active Member
Thanks guys for the reply's. I had a play with all the above yesterday, and I was pretty much sold on the G16 really ,Panasonic was to expensive but nice .

Now to see whether i can buy a good second hand one or buy new.

Dave.
 

newbie1

Distinguished Member
Johnmcl7 makes a good point about sensor size...
 

daviduk

Active Member
I was all happy :), now im looking again ,Sony../..G7x... 1" .....G16 1/1.7 sensor:(
 

newbie1

Distinguished Member
You will be glad when you see the results :)
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
If this is going to be your one and only camera what about the new Canon G5x, basically a G7x with a viewfinder? Similar price to the RX100-III, and has a longer zoom albeit at the expense of size. Both the G7x and G5x stay wider for longer compared to the RX100 too. I think the RX100 has fully stopped down to f2.8 by about 30mm or thereabouts.
 

daviduk

Active Member
Those above are to expensive ,I was hoping to keep it somewhere between £200 and £300,

The RX100 would be the mk1 at around £234
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
If you can live without the viewfinder the RX100mk1 is still a great camera, I had one from launch and the only reason I bought a newer one was for the super high framerate features.

John
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
Those above are to expensive ,I was hoping to keep it somewhere between £200 and £300,

The RX100 would be the mk1 at around £234
Ahh, didn't realise the budget. The G7x is similar to the G1x, but there's pros and cons. Pros are that it's much smaller, has a faster lens (f2.8 at the long end vs f5.6 of the G1x), and is wider at the short end (24mm vs 28mm). Cons are smaller sensor (13.2mm x 8.8mm vs 18.7mm x 14mm)and no viewfinder.

Compact Camera Meter


.
 

Strobe

Well-known Member
I don't find the need for a viewfinder on a compact (they're usually crap anyway). Another thumbs up for the RX100 Mk 1 - great camera for the price; I've had mine since launch. The G7X is well regarded and, if you can't stretch the budget to the latter RX100 series, it's also worthy of consideration.
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
The EVF on the RX100m4 is a really nice one but I very rarely use it, I never missed it on the mk1 and aside from it being a bit clumsy to use on the mk4 (as you have to pop it up then slide it back), I don't find the camera handling suits it as the body and lens are small enough they don't need support. Comparatively on the NEX-6 with the bulky 18-200mm I find I automatically use the viewfinder due to the way I need to hold the camera.

Then again on balance I know a builtin EVF was a feature some missed on the mk1/2 and found it useful on the mk3.

John
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
The EVF on the RX100m4 is a really nice one but I very rarely use it, I never missed it on the mk1 and aside from it being a bit clumsy to use on the mk4 (as you have to pop it up then slide it back), I don't find the camera handling suits it as the body and lens are small enough they don't need support. Comparatively on the NEX-6 with the bulky 18-200mm I find I automatically use the viewfinder due to the way I need to hold the camera.

Then again on balance I know a builtin EVF was a feature some missed on the mk1/2 and found it useful on the mk3.

John
I quickly tried the one on the RX100 III and found it awkward to use tbh. It doesn't fit into the eye socket well, and I found the whole thing cramped when it was up to your eye. I'd imagine 99% of the time I'd use it without tbh.

Is there any reason that the Canon G1x Mark II doesn't get much love when folk discuss compacts? Just looked at the spec and it seems pretty good, APS size sensor with reasonably fast f3.9 at the long end. Ok not as fast as the G7x or RX100-III/IV but I'd have thought the sensor size would more than make up for light loss and DOF?
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
Is there any reason that the Canon G1x Mark II doesn't get much love when folk discuss compacts? Just looked at the spec and it seems pretty good, APS size sensor with reasonably fast f3.9 at the long end. Ok not as fast as the G7x or RX100-III/IV but I'd have thought the sensor size would more than make up for light loss and DOF?

It's not an APS sized sensor which probably answers your question, the sensor is slightly larger than a 4/3 sensor but it's a good bit smaller than APS-C. Furthermore despite the fact it should have a considerable advantage over Sony's smaller 1in sensor in the RX series but it seems to be manufactured using older technology and doesn't have much advantage in noise or dynamic range. It also lags the Panasonic LX100 in features, both cameras use similar sized sensors and the Canon does offer a better focal range but the Panasonic has an onboard EVF and 4K plus 1080p/60 video while the Canon only has an optional EVF and just 1080p/30 support.

John
 

snerkler

Distinguished Member
It's not an APS sized sensor which probably answers your question, the sensor is slightly larger than a 4/3 sensor but it's a good bit smaller than APS-C. Furthermore despite the fact it should have a considerable advantage over Sony's smaller 1in sensor in the RX series but it seems to be manufactured using older technology and doesn't have much advantage in noise or dynamic range. It also lags the Panasonic LX100 in features, both cameras use similar sized sensors and the Canon does offer a better focal range but the Panasonic has an onboard EVF and 4K plus 1080p/60 video while the Canon only has an optional EVF and just 1080p/30 support.

John
Thanks, dunno where I saw it had APS sized sensor but having looked at the spec you're right, it's 'only' 18.7x14mm.
 

Johnmcl7

Distinguished Member
It's an odd sensor size, if you saw it was larger than micro 4/3 it's a reasonable assumption that it would be APS since that's usually the next step up. If it did have an APS sensor with that lens and body size I think it would be getting a lot more love.
 

daviduk

Active Member
Thanks guys for all your impute , my choices in the end were Sony rx100...canon G1x... G16

G1x was really to big to carry round ,although sensor was the best of the 3, and a few other things let it down .
I think Sony was probably the best but the G16 had more features although the smallest sensor and pixel count , and the other bonus was I was able to buy a Mint G16 for £200.

Once again Thank you very much for all your advice it was appreciated, plus you made me look round at other options instead of just diving in a buying a camera .
Dave.
 

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