Can you tell me about this Home Networking hardware ?

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by TC4637, Aug 13, 2012.

  1. TC4637

    TC4637
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi,

    I just moved into a new home and wondered if someone can tell me what this hardware is and how to use it ?

    By way of background, this unit is in a cupboard on the ground floor which also contains the only telelphone socket in the house. Also, in the lounge I have a input/output plate with FM, TV and Satellite on it. Sky comes through that Sattellite but in every other room i just have plates with FM/TV on but when i connect via an RF2 output (irrespective of channel) i can't pick up Sky in other rooms (wonder if this unit is the reason). Just on that point Sky does connect when i run a cable direct to the TV, just not through the cabling in the walls.

    Finally, in every room i have sockets in the final pic, each of which are numbered and match the numbers in the hardware pictured below.

    I am guessing this is some form of networking system but no idea if it relates to TV, phone, internet or a combination. I tried looking at ITT Industries website who is the manufacturer but it seems they sell thousands of products so finding specifics was impossible.

    Any help or guidance would be really appreciated. I have no idea whether this unit is good, half decent, how to use it or even who to call to show me.

    Thank you :clap:

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,161
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,710
    The top row - "A" - is structured cabling. Each socket in the room (A9, A10, etc) is presented onto the corresponding socket in panel A and from there you can patch it into whatever you like in the cabinet. It's not obvious from the pictures, but it's probably UTP cabling (Unshielded Twisted pair) good for analogue voice (phone) or ethernet.

    Row "B" looks similar, though as it's not patched to anything, it may be "something different." Are any of the room sockets labled "B"something..?

    Row "C" is a cable tidy.

    Row "D" is an ethernet switch.

    Row "E"and "F" I don't recognise, but I'd guess they are a fan out for analogue telephones. Whereas ethernet data networks need each lobe of the network (cable run) to be separate and have a switch which is an active device that joins them up, analogue telephones need to be wired "common bus" and don't need any active electronics to join them up.

    I'd guess all the sockets in E/F are wired together round the back. Thusly you connect your incoming phone line to one of the E/F sockets (probably after you DSL Splitter if you get your broadband down phone line) thence patch the others to any of the A/B sockets where you want a phone connected in the corresponding room socket.

    However, row "F" does say "ISDN" on it, so maybe E and F have distinct functions.

    Row "GHIJ" I don't recognise - but I'd guess it's distributing the feed from your TV/Radio antenna to all the "FM/TV" and/or maybe the satellite (can't see well enough whether there a F-plug or an "aerial" connector from the photo.)


    Lucky you - that's a really nice bit of infrastrucutue to inherit in a domestic residence. Were you not left with any manuals...?

    PS - If you put your broadband router in this closet, patch one (and only one) of your routers "LAN" sockets to one of the spare ports on the switch (Netgear) then patch the rest of the switch ports to the "A" sockets where you want to present "wired" data networking in a room (much as it is now.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  3. TC4637

    TC4637
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks Mike. Appreciate that.

    My broadband router is in the closet. The main phone socket is beneath this unit and i've connected it there. So from your response it sounds like I can connect it to the Netgear section and then connect wired in say the bedroom ? Netgear doesn't have any spare ports as it is currently configured so not really sure what they are currently doing. It could well be for this purpose because i don't get internet reception on the top floor so maybe this is a way to resolve that ?

    I only have two phones in the house and they work wirelessly to a booster type box connected to the main phone socket. They work fine around the house so not sure if this technology was put in pre wireless home phone systems and is now somewhat redundant ? The house is about 8-yrs old and the last owner didn't know anything about it so presume the first owner put it in.

    The GHIJ has me very confused. I think this is the unit that might be currently stopping me getting Sky in another room. The Sky feed currently comes in the lounge which is nowhere near this unit so not sure how to connect it to this unit. I have tried as i said to run a cable from Sky's RF2 output to the TV socket on the wall but then i can't get a recption on a TV in another room but with the Sky magic eye i can change the channel in the main room. Also, the Sky magic eye red light doesn't come on so wondering if this unit is the problem.

    Lucky me - only if i can figure out how to use it :)

    Anyone with any ideas, plse shout.
     
  4. GloopyJon

    GloopyJon
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Messages:
    8,842
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Brussels
    Ratings:
    +5,750
    I think mickevh has gleaned about as much as I would from the pictures, but just to expand a bit on what he wrote...

    A and B do indeed look like patch panels. These are basically just the ends of the cables that go around your new house to the sockets in the different rooms. They can be used to make any sort of connection that can go over Ethernet cables, including networks, telephone, HDMI-over-ethernet, TV tuners etc.

    Basically, you just connect the relevant socket here to whatever your device on the other end needs to connect to; if you connect a computer* to A1, for example, then you also need to connect socket A1 here to the computer switch (row D). If you connect a telephone to socket A2, then you must connect A2 here to the phone switch (row E). If you wanted to do HDMI over Ethernet, to send a TV signal from one room to another, you could connect to the sockets in one room (one or two, depending on the technology used), and send the signals to the socket(s) in another room. Then you would just put a little cable between the relevant sockets here. For example, say you have your Sky box next to sockets A9 and A10 (as shown in your photo), you could send the signal to a TV in another room, next to sockets A15 and A16 (to pick at random). You would then connect A9 to A15, and A10 to A16 with short patch cables, like the ones that you already have going to the Netgear switch.

    *Computer - when I say computer here, I mean anything that should connect to your home network, including wireless routers, TVs, blu ray players, satellite tuners or anything else that has a LAN connection and wants to connect to the Internet.

    Row E says ISDN, as mickevh noted. If you don't have an ISDN subscription then this will probably be redundant.

    For the rest, I'd unscrew the big module in rows I & J and pull it out, and look for other connections behind, and also a model number on the back somewhere. Then you can Google the model number and that should tell you what it is. I'd guess that it's a TV distributor that connects up to your aerial and provides the TV/FM connections in all of the rooms.

    I suspect that the thing in rows G/H is just a blanking plate, with nothing behind it. Unscrew it and have a look, or look up behind it when you pull out the thing in I/J.

    You are indeed very lucky to have all of that in your new house, I had to install it all myself and couldn't do such a professional job! My only criticism is that they have put a very small Ethernet switch, with only 4 ports (the Netgear thing in row D), where I would have put a 16 or 24 port switch.

    I also can't see where your Internet connection comes from. For my money, there should be a cable going from the 5th port on the Netgear to somewhere else, which would be the Internet connection. Do you have Internet working in the house now?

    You really should have been given documentation of all this from the seller, and I'd find the relevant invoice and contact the company that installed all of this to get someone to come round and explain it. Alternatively, if the house is relatively new, the architect should be able to tell you who did this. It's a pukka job and should serve you well.
     
  5. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,161
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,710
    Connect one of your routers LAN sockets to socket "5" on the netgear. Then (re)connect the other netgear sockets to any of the "A's" where you want the corresponding room socket to be "ethernet." There's nothing to stop you connecting any other "spare" LAN sockets on your router to the "A's" direct if you want even more live ethernet sockets.

    If you're not using analogue phones, then there no reason why you couldn't "unpatch" any unused A-E links (though there's no harm leaving them either.) For safety's sake, make a note of what's patched to what before changing anything, then you can always put it back again.

    I can't help you much with the "TV" type stuff as it's not my speciality. If you don't get much response here after a few days, ask the mods to move the thread to somewhere more appropriate, though quite a few of the people here who know TV distribution do tend to read this forum.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  6. GloopyJon

    GloopyJon
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Messages:
    8,842
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Brussels
    Ratings:
    +5,750
    Just saw your second post which appeared when I posted my message.

    As I said above, you should probably connect your broadband router to port E on the Netgear, and then you should get network connections at whichever sockets you connect to the Netgear switch. At the moment, these would appear to be A4, A5, A17 and A19 but you can change this simply by moving the connections on row A.

    When you say that you don't get Internet reception on the top floor, do you mean wireless?

    You're probably right about this, I would guess. If the house is only 8 years old and the last owner was clueless, I would definitely try to contact the original owner or architect - you should be able to track down that information (I'd ask your solicitor who did the conveyancing - they would have access to the information, or may already have got it in their files).

    I reckon you can junk rows E & F, and that G/H is just a blanking plate, but that's just guesswork so don't throw them away just yet! ;)

    See my first post. If you want Sky around the house, you'll need some kind of distributor. It sounds as though the Sky only goes to the one place, and doesn't currently go through this cabinet, so you'd need to do something complicated to sort that out. I know very little about that, so perhaps someone else can chip in.
     
  7. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,161
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,710
    I'd echo that: If you want to extend wi-fi coverage somewhere it's not good, you could patch one of the "A's" to the switch, then connect that room socket to a Wifi Access Point (in the room) to extend the coverage to the weak spot(s.)

    I'd hang on to the RJ45--BT type patchcords (even if you don't use them yourself) as they're rarer than regular RJ45--RJ45 type.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  8. TC4637

    TC4637
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks guys.

    Correct in meaning i don't get wirless internet upstairs. So i will try connecting as you say and will report back. I have a Sky router and it is connected to the main phone box below this unit. I will take it out of there and connect it to the Netgear and will check if the loop to A9 provides a wired connection. I have several old WIFI routers. If I connect one of the As to the As in the room socket could i attached a spare router there and sort of re-broadcast the signal upstairs ? Just would prefer a wireless connection than wired if that is possible ? At the moment, internet is set up completely separately to this unit but it broadcasts only so far of course.

    So JO when connecting Sky you explain how to link up A9 to A15...I get that but do i need to physically connect my Sky box to A9 or just to the TV socket on the wall next to A9 and then use the TV ariel output next to A15 and make sure that A9 and A15 have a wired loop in this box ? Just wanted to make sure i don't have to connect the Sky box to A9 itself at one end and then out of A15 itself and into the TV at the other ?

    I might take take the unit out as you say to look for a serial number or model number. There is actually a folder attached to the side of the unit where instruction manuals should have been kept. I might also send ITT an email with the pics in the hope they can help me identify it.
     
  9. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7,161
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,710
    Yes, that would be ideal. However, wi-fi is done with "Access Points" not "Routers" - there's an AP built-in to so-called "wi-fi routers." However, you can use routers as outpost AP's, but there's a couple of hoops to jump through to get it working (and remaining sane.) Have a read of our "using two routers together" FAQ for details of what you need to do.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  10. GloopyJon

    GloopyJon
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Messages:
    8,842
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Brussels
    Ratings:
    +5,750
    I don't know the Sky routers, but I imagine that they have at least one socket for the phone, which is connected to your base station, and a second socket (or possibly more) for the Internet connection. The latter should be connected to port 5 of the Netgear. In addition, of course, it should be connected to your incoming phone line!

    Re the wireless networks, there's always more than one way to skin a cat. If you want to extend your current wireless network, you can do that wirelessly with a wireless repeater, I believe, but you lose some signal strength. There's nothing to prevent you from plugging another wireless router into one of your sockets and making a second wireless network. Another option would be to do that in a central location in your house, and turn off the wireless network from your Sky router so that you just have one, but if it's placed in a better location maybe you'll get coverage throughout the house. Various options available!

    For sure use wireless if it meets your needs. Sometimes, though, you may find that it is not sufficient and you need a wired connection. For example, I recently bought a Logitech Squeezebox Touch, and it kept stopping playback to buffer the music when connecting wirelessly, but performs perfectly when it's plugged in with a cable.

    It's not quite as easy as that, I think. You will undoubtedly need additional hardware to split and/or convert the signals so that they can go over the Ethernet connections. Satellite signals normally go over coax cable. But your network installation will make it easier by giving you wires to send the signals around, once you get the right hardware. Sorry I can't tell you what that is!
     
  11. TC4637

    TC4637
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thank you. That's all very helpful.
     
  12. GloopyJon

    GloopyJon
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Messages:
    8,842
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Brussels
    Ratings:
    +5,750
    Incidentally, I meant to say that when I said you could junk some kit earlier, I don't mean you should literally throw it away! It looks like expensive kit, so if you're not using some of it, I would either (a) leave it there unused (and not plugged in so that it's not wasting electricity), or (b) take it out and store it somewhere if you need the space for new components.
     
  13. TC4637

    TC4637
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks. I appreciate the clarification. Will let you know how i get on.
     
  14. TC4637

    TC4637
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    Just wanted to come back and say the replies re the internet connection were spot on. Connected the router to the 5th Netgear socket and linked the Netgear to the A19 wall socket in my top room. I was then able to get a wired ethernet connection up there perfectly.

    I'm still working on the TV and have someone coming round later this week or early next. Thanks
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice