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Can we use a coaxial splitter for twin tuner recording?

swlondon

Novice Member
Hi there,

We have one coaxial cable coming into our living room from our satellite dish.

We are hoping to get the Samsung 46UEF7000 which has a Freesat twin tuner. If we get a coaxial splitter pack then can we watch one channel while we record another on the aforementioned Samsung tv? Or do we need two separate cables that each come all the way from the satellite dish?

Regards,
swlondon.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Two cables back to the satellite would be rather long. approx. 460,000mls or so in total :)

Not familiar with the TV but in general to fully support two satellite tuners you need separate coax feed to the lnb on the dish (the box thing on the end of the arm sticking out from the bottom of the dish) which for a Sky dish would need a quad (4 output lnb). You can't split a satellite signal like you can with an aerial. TBH you would be better off getting a proper Freesat+ plus box, recording from a TV always has major restrictions compared to a separate satellite box.
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
5
Sats are in geostationary orbit, so 300 miles or so

Where did you get 300Mls from ? The orbital height needs to be be at a height where one orbit takes exactly one sidereal day and exactly over the equator (APPROX 23h 56min). Basically the point where the Earths Gravity is exactly matched by the satellites forward velocity trying to drive the satellite straight on into space.

Approx 22000mls (35786Km) directly above the equator, In the case of Astra 2 directly above the equator at 28.5E and in the same direction as the Earth rotates. So if you happened to live on the Equator at 28.5E the satellite group will be 35786Km directly overhead. That's the only altitude and orbital path where a satellite appears stationary from the earth because the Earths rotation is exactly matched by the orbit period (The Earth does a complete rotation in a little less than 24hrs). I did get the decimal point wrong but the distance to the satellites is in excess of 22,236mls from any point on the Earths surface not directly at 0 degrees latitude, 28.5E.

For instance a satellite in a pole to pole orbit at the correct altitude will have the correct orbital period but will not appear stationary from any point on the Earths surface.

A very large asteroid actually approached the Earth in 2012 well within the Clarke Belt. At 300mls I think we would have noticed it. It would in fact have touched the very fringes of outer atmosphere.

BBC News - Asteroid 2012 DA14 in record-breaking Earth pass

All thanks to Arthur C Clarke, the geostationary orbit is known as the Clarke Belt. Any other height or orbital path then any dish wherever you are on the Earth will have to follow the satellite and will lose the signal when it goes below the visible horizon.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Lol. Thanks guys. Edited first post.

Pleased you appreciate the humour :)

However the fact that TV's do not make a very flexible recording source compared to a separate box remains. Basically a separate box can always record two separate channels, some can also allow you to watch a third channel while recording two, and then you always have the TV tuners to watch anything else you have a connection for Freeview/Freesat. TV's normally have severe restrictions on what you can do while recording (and of course you need to connect a separate recording drive to record anything (or do things like pause live TV) .
 

swlondon

Novice Member
Pleased you appreciate the humour :)

However the fact that TV's do not make a very flexible recording source compared to a separate box remains. Basically a separate box can always record two separate channels, some can also allow you to watch a third channel while recording two, and then you always have the TV tuners to watch anything else you have a connection for Freeview/Freesat. TV's normally have severe restrictions on what you can do while recording (and of course you need to connect a separate recording drive to record anything (or do things like pause live TV) .

What box can you recommend that allows us to watch one channel while we record another? For as low cost as possible.
 

logiciel

Moderator
This is explained in the fixed thread two up from here.
For most purposes a TV with two tuners and a satellite connection for each will work adequately but if you want more than that then you need a Humax machine.
 

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