Can Tivo output 1080p resolution?

Fodda

Active Member
As the title suggests I'd like to see HD TV programmes and recordings from my Tivo box at the maximum possible resolution. I spent a fortune on my telly and AV equipment, and need to know that I'm getting my money's worth.

When I go to Help & Settings - Settings - Video Output - Video Output Format - And Change Settings, I can see four supported resolutions, the only one of which selected is 1080i. There is a fifth resolution under a bar below this which is 1080p @ 25fps (not supported).

I know for a fact that my TV does support this resolution, and my AV amp can pass this through also.

Can Tivo actually support 1080p or am I already getting the most bang-for-my-buck?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
No UK broadcaster uses 1080/25p. The BBC have run a few tests using 1080p, but this was only via freeview. The TiVo setting is a remnant of the USA software and TiVo service which supports DirectTV. The DirectTV service is only available in the USA and it uses 1080/25p.

The highest resolution currently used by any of the channels available via the Virgin cable network is 1080i.


Whether or not you can actually choose this as an output option seems to depend on your make of TV. Like you my TV can handle 1080p (full HD), but the TiVo fails to recognise the fact. Some people have reported that their TV is accepted while other state the TiVo doesn't recognise the TV's abilities. I'd not worry about it though, as I said, UK broadcasters currently use 1080i max. 1080/25p isn't a commonly used video format anyway so this would explain why some TV's accept it and others don't. The more commonly used frame rate for 1080p is 24 and not 25fps. This is what is used by Blu-ray players and games consoles. Also note that the TiVo states this is only "Passthrough" meaning the TiVo cannot scale non 1080/25p content up to this resolution. AS I said, there is no 1080/25p content available in the UK for the TiVo to passthrough. Even the Beeb Freeview tests used 1080/50p and not 1080/25p.

DIGITALEUROPE certified TV sets are required to support 1080/24p, 1080/50p, and 1080/60p formats, and feature a native resolution of at least 1920×1080 pixels. 1080/25p is not a requirement or a recognised standard in Europe. Similar ATSC HDTV standards in the USA use the frame rates of 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97 and 30 frames per second.

The UK broadcasters will be using 1080/50p when they start broadcasting Full HD so the TiVo's USA configuration will require amendment (a firmware update) in order to pass this through. The 1080/25p setting is a hangover from the TiVo's USA origins.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
. Even the Beeb Freeview tests used 1080/50p and not 1080/25p.

No they don't. The transmission changes on the fly between 1080i50 and 1080p25 depending on programme content. They are still doing it, some TV's have a problem with the interlaced/progressive gop change on the fly.

About the only source of 1080p50 is high end camcorders made by makers like Panasonic or video sourced from the internet.

Cable excepted there is not the bandwidth to handle the near double bandwidth required for 1080p50.

A 1080p50 service might be possible on cable but they would almost certainly need to change from mpeg2 to H264/AVC compression.
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
No they don't. The transmission changes on the fly between 1080i50 and 1080p25 depending on programme content. They are still doing it, some TV's have a problem with the interlaced/progressive gop change on the fly.

About the only source of 1080p50 is high end camcorders made by makers like Panasonic or video sourced from the internet.

Cable excepted there is not the bandwidth to handle the near double bandwidth required for 1080p50.

A 1080p50 service might be possible on cable but they would almost certainly need to change from mpeg2 to H264/AVC compression.

I'll post it again:

The HD ready 1080p logo program by DIGITALEUROPE requires that certified TV sets support 1080p24, 1080p50, and 1080p60 formats, and feature a native resolution of at least 1920×1080 pixels, among other requirements.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1080p

1080/25p is not a recognised HD TV standard in Europe.


The Freeview HD boxes needed to play the Beebs 1080/25p broadcasts must be mandated to be able to output 1080p/50fps in order to provide compliance with European HDTV standards. Freeview HD STBs are supposed to be able toautomatically detect 1080p material and change encoding appropriately. The TiVo's 1080/25p passthrough option doesn't comply with European standards and will not be compatible with many TVs that are certified for HD in Europe.


AS far as TVs are concerned, the Full HD TV standard for Europe is 1080/50p and not 1080/25p.
 
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Fodda

Active Member
Thanks Dante. I had a gut feeling that I was watching the highest resolution available, just needed to check that I wasn't missing out on 1080p for any reason. I'll have a look at the passthrough settings on my AV amp and see if I can't get the TV to upscale to 1080p... Although I'm not sure how good that would be in the long run.

It's the text in the Video Output Format screen that's confusing. It says about resolutions the TV won't support as being labelled "not supported", and that's exactly what's coming up, rather than something else like "Not Available".

Cheers again. It always seems to be you that comes to my aid as well. :-D
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
I'll post it again:

The HD ready 1080p logo program by DIGITALEUROPE requires that certified TV sets support 1080p24, 1080p50, and 1080p60 formats, and feature a native resolution of at least 1920×1080 pixels, among other requirements.

1080p - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1080/25p is not a recognised HD TV standard in Europe.

1080p broadcasts being tested by the BBC - 3view Forum

BBC HD 1080p/1080i Switching Causing Audio Dropouts On Some Sony HDTVs

BBC HD - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BBC shifts some HD transmissions to 1080p...

All Tv's that state 1080i50 should be capable of identifying frames delivered in two 1/50 sec fields or a single frame of 1/25second.

For years PAL DVD players have been output 576p at 25 fps over component connections, all TV's with component inputs can display this signal.

Perhaps you ought to tell the BBC this.
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
1080p broadcasts being tested by the BBC - 3view Forum

BBC HD 1080p/1080i Switching Causing Audio Dropouts On Some Sony HDTVs

BBC HD - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BBC shifts some HD transmissions to 1080p...

All Tv's that state 1080i50 should be capable of identifying frames delivered in two 1/50 sec fields or a single frame of 1/25second.

For years PAL DVD players have been output 576p at 25 fps over component connections, all TV's with component inputs can display this signal.

Perhaps you ought to tell the BBC this.

Can you read?

The Freeview HD boxes needed to play the Beebs 1080/25p broadcasts must be mandated to be able to output 1080p/50fps in order to provide compliance with European HDTV standards. Freeview HD STBs are supposed to be able toautomatically detect 1080p material and change encoding appropriately. The TiVo's 1080/25p passthrough option doesn't comply with European standards and will not be compatible with many TVs that are certified for HD in Europe.

Who mentioned 576p at 25 fps? I believe the discussion is over 1080p not 576p? Again, The HD ready 1080p logo program by DIGITALEUROPE requires that certified TV sets support 1080p24, 1080p50, and 1080p60 formats, and feature a native resolution of at least 1920×1080 pixels, among other requirements.

If any TV capable of accepting 50 fps can accept 25fps then why is it mandatory for all HD Freeview boxes to output 1080p broadcasts at 50fps and not the native 25fps???

By the way, component is no longer a requirement or recognised standard as far as TV goes.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Thanks Dante. I had a gut feeling that I was watching the highest resolution available, just needed to check that I wasn't missing out on 1080p for any reason. I'll have a look at the passthrough settings on my AV amp and see if I can't get the TV to upscale to 1080p... Although I'm not sure how good that would be in the long run.

It's the text in the Video Output Format screen that's confusing. It says about resolutions the TV won't support as being labelled "not supported", and that's exactly what's coming up, rather than something else like "Not Available".

Cheers again. It always seems to be you that comes to my aid as well. :-D

1080p isn't a resolution, it's a way the signal is delivered. Progressive means all the pixels for a frame arrive sequentially starting with line 1 and finishing at the last line.

Interlaced means the pixels are delivered in two parts. Eg lines 1 3 5 7 etc to the last followed by lines 2 4 6 8 etc. CRT TV's require the signal this way because they rely on the screen phosphors decay time to create a picture.

Your TV will work with a least the following commonly used broadcast resolutions.

720 x 576, 704 x 576, 544 x 576, 1440 x 1080, 1920 x 1080 and one not commonly used 1280 x 720.

In common with all new HD boxes pretty sure the TIVO will de-interlace 1080i50 to 1080p25 provided your TV tells the TIVo box it supports this. Freeview-HD boxes most definetely do so (It's part of the spec), earlier HD Ready Tv's could only show progressive signals at 1280 x 720 - 720p this was specified in the original EICTA HD Ready specification)

A friend has one, pretty sure I set it up to output 1080p for all channels. I will have a look next time I see her.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
By the way, component is no longer a requirement or recognised standard as far as TV goes.

The standard line up of new quality TV's is one scart, three or four hdmi, one component and generally one vga.

As it happens I just bought a brand New Sony with exactly that socket line up.

Confused are you saying the BBC is not outputting 1080p25 ?

You said no UK broadcaster uses 1080p25 but that the Beeb had tested 1080p50 a totally incorrect statement

Next that this was a hangover from the US designed TIVO

Firstly in the US 50Hz frame rates do not exist, secondly the Virgin TIVO box is not related in any way other than the UI with the former SD only Freeview box formerly available. Afaik it's exclusively a UK design.
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
In common with all new HD boxes pretty sure the TIVO will de-interlace 1080i50 to 1080p25 provided your TV tells the TIVo box it supports this. Freeview-HD boxes most definetely do so (It's part of the spec), earlier HD Ready Tv's could only show progressive signals at 1280 x 720 - 720p this was specified in the original EICTA HD Ready specification)

A friend has one, pretty sure I set it up to output 1080p for all channels. I will have a look next time I see her.

The TiVo can only passthrough 1080p and has no 1080p upscaling abilities. Furthermore, it has no frame rate conversion abilities such as those that are mandatory for HD Freeview boxes when dealing with 1080p. All HD Freeview boxes output 1080p at 50fps.

The only 1080p option available to the TiVo is 1080/25p passthrough. No cable broadcaster currently uses this and even if they did, the vast majority of European HD TV certified TVs would not be compliant.

The 1080/25p passthrough option on the TiVo is a hangover from the TiVo's US origins and the US ATSC HDTV standards.


As a further exploration of what is the situation with 1080/25 and 50fps:

In Europe, 1080p25 signals have been supported by the DVB suite of broadcasting standards. The 1080p50 standard has been foreseen as a future-proof production format, and eventually a future broadcasting format.[3] 1080p50 broadcasting should require the same bandwidth as 1080i50 signal and only 15-20% more than that of 720p50 signal due to increased compression efficiency,[5] though 1080p50 production requires more bandwidth and/or more efficient codecs such as JPEG 2000, high-bitrate MPEG-2, or H.264/AVC and HEVC.[8]
Since September 2009, ETSI and EBU, the maintainers of the DVB suite, added support for 1080p50 signal coded with MPEG-4 AVC High Profile Level 4.2 with Scalable Video Coding extensions or VC-1 Advanced Profile compression; DVB also supports 1080p encoded at ATSC frame rates of 23.976, 24, 29.97, 30, 59.94 and 60.[9][10]
EBU requires that legacy MPEG-4 AVC decoders should at least not crash in presence of SVC and/or 1080p50 (and higher resolution) packets.[9] SVC enables forward compatibility with 1080p50 and 1080p60 broadcasting for older MPEG-4 AVC receivers, so they will only recognize baseline SVC stream coded at a lower resolution or frame rate (such as 720p60 or 1080i60) and will gracefully ignore additional packets, while newer hardware will be able to decode full-resolution signal (such as 1080p60).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1080p


The AV equipment manufacturing industry has adopted the term Full HD as the consumer-friendly marketing term to mean the set is a safe purchase because it can display all available HD resolutions up to 1080p. The term is misleading, however, because it does not guarantee the set is capable of rendering digital video at all frame rates encoded in source files with 1080 pixel vertical resolution. Most notably, a "Full HD" set is not guaranteed to support the 1080p24 format, leading to consumer confusion.

DigitalEurope (formerly EICTA) maintains the HD ready 1080p logo program that requires the certified TV sets to support 1080p24, 1080p50, and 1080p60, without overscan/underscan and picture distortion.

Note that neither Digital Europe or Full HD cite 1080/25p has a recognised or required display standard for HD TVs in Europe.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
I give up

Are the BBC using 1080P25 YES/NO you said not.

Are European sets capable of displaying 1080p25 YES/NO.

As some HD camcorders can natively record in this format I imagine they would not if the footage could not be viewed.

Are component connections still fitted as standard Yes/NO

My sony has one 1080p50 compatible.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I give up

Are the BBC using 1080P25 YES/NO you said not.

Are European sets capable of displaying 1080p25 YES/NO.

As some HD camcorders can natively record in this format I imagine they would not if the footage could not be viewed.

Are component connections still fitted as standard Yes/NO

My sony has one 1080p50 compatible.

Apart from the BBC using 1080/25p, the answers are NO. THe only way the Beeb get away with it is because of the mandatory 50fps output of all HD Freeview boxes when dealing with 1080p. There is no requirement for TVs to be able to display 1080/25p in Europe to get HD certification, hence why many TVs in Europe fail to comply with the TiVo's auto detection even though they are Full HD compliant for Europe. Component is actually outlawed as far as HD is concerned due to non HDCP compliance and as such many manufacturers will no longer be equipping their sets with it. Cable, satellite and Freeview boxes already omit component and have done so for some time now. Component is to be restricted to non HD resolutions from here on in.

Your Sony is also not capable of displaying 1080/25p. But you didn't know that did you :)
 
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Boostrail

Distinguished Member
The TiVo setting is a remnant of the USA software and TiVo service which supports DirectTV. The DirectTV service is only available in the USA and it uses 1080/25p.

Notwithstanding the discussion between yourself and grahamlthompson I would query this statement.

US spec TV's are notorious for not supporting 25/50 i/p formats. I would suggest that the DirectTV service is 1080/30p
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Notwithstanding the discussion between yourself and grahamlthompson I would query this statement.

US spec TV's are notorious for not supporting 25/50 i/p formats. I would suggest that the DirectTV service is 1080/30p

DirectTV actually uses 1080/24p so you are right about my statement in relation to the TiVo being incorrect, but not about the actual frame rate used by DirectTV. The US standards for HDTV do encompass 1080/25p though and the European standards do not. This does substantiate my saying that the setting is a legacy of the TiVo's US heritage. The bit about DirectTV is something I'd previously read elsewhere as to why the setting was available on TiVo boxes in general.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Component is actually outlawed as far as HD is concerned due to non HDCP compliance and as such many manufacturers will no longer be equipping their sets with it.Your Sony is also not capable of displaying 1080/25p. But you didn't know that did you :)

I will test the latter but you need to think outside the box there's no problem in viewing BBC-HD freeview whatever it's outputting.

Component is not banned it's just subject to being disabled by broadcasters using propriety epg systems like Freesat, Freeview-HD and Sky-HD (and Virgin) and certain blu-ray discs to outputting a lesser resolution. (A bit of a totally pointless attempt to prevent direct copying of HD content in HD that only affects anyone wanting to archive HD content and has no affect whatsoever on the pirates)

Current blu-ray players all have component outputs afaik. (Unless you are talking really cheap - (crap) ones)

Without the MHEG or extra capabilities of such systems there is no way to prevent component output.

In addition there are 100% legal gadgets that allow hdcp hdmi outputs to convert to analogue component for use with legacy HD Kit. Try Googling HD Fury 2.

Are you also suggesting VGA HD analogue inputs on TV's will be banned, it's not difficult to convert one to the other.

Generic free to air satellite and freesat boxes used as free to air sources have no such restriction using free to air sources, all generic fta HD sat boxes feature HD Component output. I would imagine PC DVB-T2 cards will not have such restrictions either. Neither do HD games machines like the X Box 360 have any such restriction.

I can easily create some 1080p25 footage and test whether it will play, I don't expect any problems.
 
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Boostrail

Distinguished Member
This time "withstanding" the above discussion

All broadcast HD TV in the UK is 1080/50i except when the BBC decides to use GOP switching to 1080/25p on Freeview HD only

This switching is only appilcable to TV's with an integral Freeview HD(DVB-T2) tuner. This did cause some problems on some TV's (notably Sony on Audio)

An extermal freeview HD or as in this case Tivo box will give a fixed output of 1080i or 1080p irrespective of the nature of the received format even if it were to be GOP switched.. The only question in this case is which device de-interlaces best? The external box (1080p setting) or the TV (1080i setting on the box)

Of course any DVD player ouput is progressive and the input should be set accordingly.
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
I will test the latter but you need to think outside the box there's no problem in viewing BBC-HD freeview whatever it's outputting.

Component is not banned it's just subject to being disabled by broadcasters using propriety epg systems like Freesat, Freeview-HD and Sky-HD and certain blu-ray discs to outputting a lesser resolution. Without the MHEG or extra capabilities of such systems there is no way to prevent component output. In addition there are 100% legal gadgets that allow hdcp outputs to convert to analogue component for use with legacy HD Kit. Try Googling HD Fury 2.

Generic free to air satellite and freesat boxes used as free to air sources have no such restriction using free to air sources, all generic fta HD sat boxes feature HD Component output. I would imagine PC DVB-T2 cards will not have such restrictions either. Neither do HD games machines like the X Box 360 have any such restriction either.

I can easily create some 1080p25 footage and test whether it will play, I don't expect any problems.

There is issue viewing 1080p BBC broadcasts if the Freeview box has not had its software updated. It is mandatory for all Freeview HD boxes to output 1080p at 50fps.

It has nothing to do with the broadcasters. The ability of component to handle HD is now restricted on the hardware and regardless of HDCP compliance. You cannot pass HD signals via component on new devices still being equipped with component.

I own a Sony Bravia and Sony are one of the manufacturers who's European TVs are not compliant with the TiVo's capability check. The 1080p 25 fps option is greyed out for Sony TVs.

I suspect that many TVs destined for Europe lack 1080p 25fps in their HDMI EDID because it would not be strictly required in order for the TV to gain European Full HD certification.
 
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Boostrail

Distinguished Member
DirectTV actually uses 1080/24p so you are right about my statement in relation to the TiVo being incorrect, but not about the actual frame rate used by DirectTV. The US standards for HDTV do encompass 1080/25p though and the European standards do not. This does substantiate my saying that the setting is a legacy of the TiVo's US heritage. The bit about DirectTV is something I'd previously read elsewhere as to why the setting was available on TiVo boxes in general.

Pleased you see the difference in specification:D. 1080/24p |(BR) is of course accepted by US spec TV's, but 25/50 variants are not.

I haven't a clue as to whether you are correct in saying that 1080/25p is or isn't included in the European HDTV standard.

All I know is that my camcorder that shoots in various formats but I use 1080/25p, replays superbly via HDMI through all my 3 1080x1920 european spec Tv's including one that only cost me £100

Edit: Yes I do get an onscreen note that says the input is 1080/25p in all 3 cases
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
Pleased you see the difference in specification:D. 1080/24p |(BR) is of course accepted by US spec TV's, but 25/50 variants are not.

I haven't a clue as to whether you are correct in saying that 1080/25p is or isn't included in the European HDTV standard.

All I know is that my camcorder that shoots in various formats but I use 1080/25p, replays superbly via HDMI through all my 3 1080x1920 european spec Tv's including one that only cost me £100


HDV camcorders capable of native 1080-line progressive video record it at rates of 23.98 frame/s (commonly referred to as "24p") and 29.97 frame/s ("30p") for 60 Hz markets, and at 25 frame/s ("25p") for 50 Hz markets. Video is output as true progressive video via an i.LINK/Firewire port. Output through other ports is performed in interlaced mode to preserve compatibility with existing interlaced equipment.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
While I'm here.

I don't see anyone else coming up with any better an explanation as to why the TiVo does not allow 1080p to be selected with all European certified Full HD TVs. In fact I'm not the only person to cite the reasons I've given.

Another point that seems to have been ignored. Why do all HD Freeview boxes have to output 1080p at 50 fps rather than simply using the native 1080p 25fps as broadcast by the BBC?

As far as component is concerned, who cares? The TiVo has no component output so fail to see the relevance?

Just for reference:

2010: The Year AACS and HDMI Kill Off Component Video
After December 31, 2010, manufacturers will not be "allowed" introduce new hardware with component video outputs supplying more than an SD resolution (480i or 576i). If the manufacturer has existing models in its line-up, it will be able to continue selling that model until the end of 2013.
http://www.audioholics.com/news/industry-news/aacs-hdmi-kill-component-2010
 
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Boostrail

Distinguished Member
HDV camcorders capable of native 1080-line progressive video record it at rates of 23.98 frame/s (commonly referred to as "24p") and 29.97 frame/s ("30p") for 60 Hz markets, and at 25 frame/s ("25p") for 50 Hz markets. Video is output as true progressive video via an i.LINK/Firewire port. Output through other ports is performed in interlaced mode to preserve compatibility with existing interlaced equipment.

I disagree!!
I do not think you are au fait with current camcorder output formats. No modern HDTV camcorder uses i-link/firewire output. :confused:

The last format (HD-DV -tape based) to use this interface died a few years ago.:eek:

I am talking about using a direct camcorder to TV replay via HDMI.;)
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
I disagree!!
I do not think you are au fait with current camcorder output formats. No modern HDTV camcorder uses i-link/firewire output. The last format (HD-DV -tape based) to use this interface died a few years ago.:eek:
I am talking about using a direct camcorder to TV replay via HDMI.;)

I've no idea then. Have you a TiVo and can you access the 1080p output option? Maybe you're just lucky enough to have TVs that all have 1080p 25fps listed in their HDMI EDID? It is apparent that not all TVs makes sold in the EU are effected. All I can say is that 1080p 25fps is not a recognised European standard for Full HD.
 

Boostrail

Distinguished Member
I've no idea then. Have you a TiVo and can you access the 1080p output option? Maybe you're just lucky enough to have TVs that all have 1080p 25fps listed in their HDMI EDID? It is apparent that not all TVs makes sold in the EU are effected.

No I dont have a TiVo (apart from storage still think V+ is better option) but I do have 2 freeview HD boxes both of which I can switch between 1080i or 1080p output- so its down to the de-interlacer in the box or the TV.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I may be able to cast some light on why some TVs comply whilst others fail to pass the TiVo's check.

THe new requirements for "HD TV" (formerly HD Ready") state the following:

The new logos allow licensees to differentiate between their display devices based on additional qualifications defined on top of those outlined in the Minimum Requirements of the DIGITALEUROPE "HD ready" and "HD TV" logo and specifically related to handling and representing “1080p” video signals that are becoming available to the consumer.
Display products bearing the 1080p qualifier logos not only feature a minimum 1920 x 1080 resolution, but also guarantee that the relevant 1080p signal variants – 24 Hz, 50 Hz and 60 Hz – can be acquired, as well as reproduced with the same or higher frame rate. These minimum requirements are aimed to stop the proliferation of proprietary logoed products in the European marketplace that are creating confusion among consumers surrounding products which claim to conform to a variety of "Full HD" and "1080" standards.

The interesting bit is this:
Display products bearing the 1080p qualifier logos not only feature a minimum 1920 x 1080 resolution, but also guarantee that the relevant 1080p signal variants – 24 Hz, 50 Hz and 60 Hz – can be acquired, as well as reproduced with the same or higher frame rate.


I'm guessing that Freeview are covering their bases by insisting all Feeview HD boxes output 1080p at the higher frame rate (50 Hz). This gives greater compatibility. Freeview HD boxes output 1080p at 50fps regardless of the native frame rate.

It is also apparent that 1080p 50fps is to be the new full HD standard for broadcast purposes so maybe there's less reason to list 25fps if it isn't that widely used or standardised throughout the industry? Note that this is still subject to testing by all parties involved.

I must emphasise that the actual frame rate must be listed in the hardware's EDID along with the corresponding resolution for that signal to be display or for the hardware to send back compatibility verification to other HDMI equipped devices during handshakes.
 
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grahamlthompson

In memoriam
It is also apparent that 1080p 50fps is to be the new full HD standard for broadcast purposes so maybe there's less reason to list 25fps if it isn't that widely used or standardised throughout the industry? Note that this is still subject to testing by all parties involved.

.

There's no way that 1080p50 will become the broadcast standard for years, there simply is not enough bandwidth. HD camcorders that record 1080p50 use an average bitrate of around 28mbps, that's around 3-4 times the bitrate used by a satellite FULL-HD 1080i channel. Virgin HD services unlike the more efficient H264/AVC compression used by camcorders and other HD broadcast sources use mpeg2 so they would need to approximately double that to achieve similar picture quality. afaik know there are no 1080p50 broadcasts in Europe and only one 1080p60 satellite based service in the US.

Rang my friend who confirms her TV reports 1080p when watching her Tivo.

Latest top of the range Denon AV Amp

DENON UK | AVR-4311

Note 3 component inputs and one component output.
 

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