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Can this be done (Amplifier to Receiver)

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by rupbert, Apr 9, 2005.

  1. rupbert

    rupbert
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    Hey guys/gals...

    Receiver: Sony STRDB790
    CD: NAD 521BEE
    Speakers: Tannoy R2

    So far I have been content with listening to music with the 790 using direct mode.

    However, I now want to buy a dedicated stereo amplifier, probably the NAD 352CT.

    I don't have the space to have seperate speakers for the stereo system, so I want to integrate the amplifier as easily as possible.

    Technically I don't know if it's possible!

    The NAD 352 has a pair of pre-outs, is this how I would connect it to the 790's phono in, with the speakers remaining attached to the 790?

    Or does the receiver need preouts for this to be possible? (the 790 doesn't have any).

    So it would be:

    CD > AMP > RECEIVER > SPEAKERS?

    Thanks,
    rupbert
     
  2. reservoir51

    reservoir51
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    The only option is to connect the pre-outs of your NAD to an input channel on the Sony (eg. CD or DVD) - but I'm sure the phono channel wouldn't work. I know because I tried it (using different amps) several years ago. Set the volume on your Sony to half-way and use your NAD to control the listening volume. Connect the CD player to the NAD and speakers should be connected to the Sony. Ensure that you've selected the appropriate channel on your Sony (eg. if you've connected the NAD to the CD input on the Sony, switch the Sony onto the CD channel whenever you're listening to CDs). To prevent over-processing of the signal, switch the Sony onto pure direct stereo mode, and any tone adjustments (or better still, bypass or direct mode) can be done on the NAD.

    For movies, connect your DVD player directly to the Sony (hence bypassing the NAD).

    reservoir51
     
  3. rupbert

    rupbert
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    Hey reservoir51,

    Thanks for the quick reply.

    If I use your suggested connection, is there any degradation of the sound quality? Would the stereo sound be better using:

    Receiver with preout > Amplifier > Speakers?

    I assume that when using direct mode on the receiver, there is no actual modification of the sound?
     
  4. reservoir51

    reservoir51
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    The ideal situation is to have the front pre-outs from your receiver going into the input of a power amp, with the power amp driving the speakers. However, the quality of sound will also depend on your receiver's pre-amplifier stage, which obviously can't compare with the pre-amp stage of dedicated stereo amps (unless the receiver is exceptional). If you haven't got a power amp, an integrated amp will also work, but the results are probably not as good (imagine the signal pathway here - pre-amp signal from receiver going into the pre-amp stage followed by the power amp stage in the integrated; not very direct!). To do this, simply connect the pre-out terminal of your receiver to an input channel on the integrated amp eg. CD.

    Using direct mode on the receiver helps, because as you say there is no further modification of the signal, but the output depends on other factors as well eg. pre-amplification of the signal by your receiver. If this is poor, then even if you use a good power amp to amplify this signal, the result will still be poor ie. the output will only be as good as the pre-amp, no matter how good the power amp is.

    It really depends on what you're after and how much you're willing to spend. If you're happy with your receiver's stereo performance (in pure direct mode, mind you), then chances are you'd also be happy with its pre-amp stage, in which case you could either get a power amp or an integrated amp to use in conjunction with the receiver for stereo duties eg. CDs. The other option is to get a separate system unit altogether for music, with separate speakers and amp (or amps).

    reservoir51
     
  5. rupbert

    rupbert
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    Thanks for the detailed reply,

    I understand the ideal setup, which you have mentioned, however I don't want to have two seperate speaker setups.

    I understand the quality of the receivers pre-amp stage is important, however I want to remain in my receivers price bracket -£300.

    I guess my question is; will I notice a difference by just adding an integrated amplifier (NAD 320BEE or 352CT)? And using your method CD > AMP > RECEIVER

    Or would I notice a a much bigger difference by replacing my receiver, with one that has L/R preouts? Say the Denon 19/2105. And using the ideal method RECEIVER > AMP, CD > AMP?

    And yes I a happy with the performance of the 790 in direct mode, however I feel it is lacking in the low end, which is why I wish to add an amp.
     
  6. reservoir51

    reservoir51
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    Well, I don't know the answer to your first question. I guess it's possible, but it really depends on your Sony's stereo performance, and how much the signal becomes modified. The pre-amp signal from the NAD will also go through the pre-amp stage again in the Sony, and this may well degrade the sound. If you're keen to pursue this option, then I would suggest that you get an integrated amp rather than a power amp and demo it to see if it's to your liking. There's certainly no guarantee that it will work well, because it looks as if your Sony receiver wasn't designed to accommodate another amp.

    For your second question, I do know that the Denon 2105 is a great receiver with a fantastic stereo performance. You may well be happy with its stereo duties, such that you may not need to add another amp, unless you're thinking of bi-amping your speakers. If you are, then I would suggest that you get a power amp instead of an integrated amp, to power the front pre-outs of the Denon.

    Whatever you do, make sure you demo the setup first before buying anything. Hope that helps.

    reservoir51
     
  7. Mike-M

    Mike-M
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    If it helps I recently tried a swith box from Ixos. You can use it with two amps and one set of speakers because it has to be turned through an "Off" position to switch between amp's. If your interested I'll search out the details and let you know.
     

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