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Can I use two network hubs on the same telephone line?

Zippy77777

Active Member
Hi people

I live in an annex to my landlords house and they have the network hub in their place connected to BT. I use the wireless capabilities of the box in my little place next door, but it is very slow.

I have Sky HD also in my annex which is connected to a phone line that is working as it has to be connected to the Landlords main line for the Sky to work (Sky is connected to this line)

They have gone away and lent me the Network Router and I've plugged it in to my main line (Sky line) and it all works a treat!!!! PS3 hard wired, better signal, everything!!

Thing is when they get back I will have to return it..... and then its all back to slow wireless again :-(

Could I buy my own network router or access point and plug it into the Sky socket once I have returned theirs to them or will this not work as technically there will be two routers on the same line? DO YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN??

Can anyone throw any light on this for me?

Thank you and waiting in anticipation :) :hiya:
 

MaturityDodger

Well-known Member
I don't think you can do this, but I've never tried it.
You could, however, get a couple of powerline devices. One for your landlord to plug into the router, and another for you to plug into a switch on your side.
Or similar in wireless-N.
 

Zippy77777

Active Member
explain powerline devices?

or similar in wireless-N what does this mean?
 

SUMMONER

Novice Member
Powerline adapters, also called Homeplugs, can create a network connection via existing electrical cables. For this to work both your landlords house and your flat need to be on the same electricity meter.

You buy a twin pack of adapters, one plugs into the wireless router in your landlords place and the other into a power socket in yours. You can now connect a hub to the Homeplug adapter, to hard wire your devices into it or a Wireless router/access point so you can connect wirelessly and wired.
 
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MaturityDodger

Well-known Member
Apologies, it's hard to gauge somebody's knowledge. I've gone the other way and been accused of being patronising in the past too!

One powerline would plug into the landlord's router by ethernet cable, and into the mains. The other would plug into the mains in your annex, and then either into your device or even into a switch for multiple devices. The data is transferred through the actual power lines. This only works if you're on the same consumer unit as the landlord. I think that 200Mbps is standard for these devices.

For the wireless option, you would get the landlord to plug a wireless-N (some are up to 300Mbps) access point into the router with an ethernet cable. You'll then get much more reliable wi-fi coverage on your side. If that's still not enough, you can get a wireless-N bridge that you could then connect by ethernet to devices or a switch on your side.


Also I'm not going to tell anybody, but if your annex is totally separate (its own front door etc) then there might be legal issues in sharing sky and internet between the two.
 
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Zippy77777

Active Member
thx guys and the annex belongs to them, its all part of the same address. i really wanna try my own box tho and see if it works!
 

SUMMONER

Novice Member
thx guys and the annex belongs to them, its all part of the same address. i really wanna try my own box tho and see if it works!
It is not possible to connect more than 1 ADSL router to a phone line. You would have to pay BT to install another phone line (with it's own phone number) and pay it's line rental and of course also pay for a 2nd broadband connection for said line.
 
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Zippy77777

Active Member
It is not possible to connect more than 1 ADSL router to a phone line. You would have to pay BT to install another phone line (with it's own phone number) and pay it's line rental and of course also pay for a 2nd broadband connection for said line.
what about an access point in that socket?
 

MaturityDodger

Well-known Member
Shouldn't be much difference, but here are some major considerations.

* Both cost about the same - SUMMONER posted a £60 pair of homeplugs, and TP-link make access points/bridges in roughly the same price range.
* Homeplugs' performance can be degraded by noisy electricity supplies
* The wireless solution's performance can be degraded by a lot of walls or distance.
* Both solutions need a device placing on your landlord's side of the wall - hope they won't mind!
* The wireless solution should give you the added advantage of improved wireless coverage and speed around the house for you and the landlord.
* Homeplugs do seem to be the standard advice for this type of problem, so maybe there are more advantages. Expandability with more plugs maybe?
 

SUMMONER

Novice Member
Good set of Zyxel made Homeplugs + the Buffalo WHR-G300N Wireless N router/accesspoint/bridge/repeater.

In theory the Buffalo WHR-G300N could accomplish the task without the homeplugs (wireless network bridge function), but frankly setup is complicated and there is no guarantee you would actually get a good wireless signal (meaning Internet may still be choppy and slow).

Homeplugs are the way to go in this kind of situation or drill a hole and run a CAT5 cable (that would be my personal choice).
 
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Zippy77777

Active Member
dont think they will go with that lol

thx again
 

SUMMONER

Novice Member
little 8mm hole somewhere in a corner, close to the skirting board? Well... a set of homeplugs it is in that case.
 

Amran

Active Member
Or you can try something else that i use currently at my home due to poor wireless range. Get the homeplug pair + a router connect one homeplug in your landlord wireless router and connect the other one to the router you have bought. once it connected you have to go into the router setting that in your room not lanlord and change the hub IP Address to 192.168.1.xx the last two number can be any up to you but make sure it isn't same one as the landord router ip address. once you changed the adress disable the dhcp and then you are done you can use the router in you room for hardwire your devices and wireless for pc or laptop. But the electrcity meter has to be in same house/flat for this to work.
 

Zippy77777

Active Member
But what extra will this achieve over just having the plugs which can be hard wired anyway. Why would you need a router? x
 

Amran

Active Member
So you can connect 3 devices hard wired because your going to be using one port for the home plug + you get to use wireless and get excellent signal.

But it up to you if you want to hard wire your ps3,pc,laptop etc using one sets of home plug then go for it because really i think you might get fed up opening and putting on another device. :)
 
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MaturityDodger

Well-known Member
I'd buy the homeplugs first, on their own. Then see if you want anything else.
If you want to boost the wireless in your area, add an access point.
If you want to hard-wire more than one device, add a switch.
Or add a device that does both, as mentioned by Amran.
 

Zippy77777

Active Member
Two Tp link plugs it is then. Landlady plugs hers in and connects cat5 to router? I just plug mine in and hard wire ps3 to it? Then I can use laptop and iPhone wirelessly etc to the plug??. Is this all correct?
 

SUMMONER

Novice Member
Two Tp link plugs it is then. Landlady plugs hers in and connects cat5 to router? I just plug mine in and hard wire ps3 to it? Then I can use laptop and iPhone wirelessly etc to the plug??. Is this all correct?
Almost. Std Homeplugs don't do Wireless, you have plug your devices/a hub into them with a network cable.

You can either buy a set of homplugs + a Wireless router/accesspoint -OR- buy a specialist Homeplug that also has a wireless access point built in.
ie: Solwise Wireless-N HomePlug AV Ethernet Adapter Starter Kit - £68.28 delivered
 
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beerhunter

Novice Member
BTW, the recommendation to use HomePlugs will be based on your being on the same electricity meter as your landlord.
 

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