Can I use a powered monitor speaker as a single home entertainment speaker?

Oswaldish

Novice Member
Hi,
I have a powered monitor speaker that I had for some music stuff and I was wondering if it would be easy enough to use it as a single speaker for home entertainment (connecting TV, Laptop, MP3 player etc)?
Its a Rokit 5 from KRK systems:
ROKIT 5 Studio Monitors Speaker KRK SYSTEMS

It has one unbalanced input socket (RCA) and two balanced input sockets (TRS and XLR).

So I guess what I would need would be a good way of connecting from a 3.5mm jack source into one of these inputs.

Any help/advice would be really appreciated!

Regards,
Neil
 

MaturityDodger

Well-known Member
Your main problem is that this is one speaker, and so a mono channel. The inputs will all be stereo as a minimum.

You can get stereo-to-mono adaptors from around £20 - Stereo/Mono Converter SMC-1
You would plug one of the outputs into the RCA input on your speaker, and use the stereo inputs to connect your devices to.

If your electronics skills are any good, then you can make one of these yourself incredibly cheaply.


Your other problem is that of source selection.
If you went down the above route then you have one pair of RCA inputs, and a few outputs from sources to connect to it. You could either change the cables manually every time, or invest in a stereo RCA switch. These can be had for a fiver if you look hard enough.



Even if you do all this, then you will lose the stereo effect from your audio. Both the left and right channels will be mixed to a mono channel. With one speaker, there's absolutely no way of escaping this though.
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
Or what about buying another for £112.50 (B-stock)?

KRK Rokit 5 Monitors, RP5G2 Pair £224.00

Make sure it's exactly the same model as your one though (is yours the RP5 G2?)

Listening in mono really isn't great - sound location is concentrated at one point, which I find pretty fatiguing, whereas stereo gives as much better, more comfortable spread of sound, as you probably realise.
 

Oswaldish

Novice Member
Thanks for your reply!

So if I was to use the stereo to mono converter then I could just connect the source to the converter using a 3.5mm jack to R/L RCA cable and then connect one of the mono output's of the converter to the speaker using a R/L RCA to R/L RCA cable but only using one side of the cable.

Is that right?

Cheers,
Neil
 

MaturityDodger

Well-known Member
Yes, that's right... if mono is definitely the way you want to go.

If you want to see roughly what it'll sound like but without spending any money, then you can just use a 3.5mm - 2 x RCA cable, and only connect one of the RCAs.
This will throw away one channel so you won't be hearing everything, but you can still hopefully get an idea for what it does, just giving you a point source like that.

Then you can decide whether you want to spend £20 on a mono solution or £112 on stereo (as per dogfonos' link above)
 

Oswaldish

Novice Member
Ok, thanks guy's. I'll try the mono with the cable like you suggest and then decide the best option.

In your opinion, would two of these studio monitors in a stereo configuration be a reasonable home entertainment speaker set-up or would I be better off just investing in a more conventional home cinema speaker system?
 

MaturityDodger

Well-known Member
Oswaldish said:
Ok, thanks guy's. I'll try the mono with the cable like you suggest and then decide the best option.

In your opinion, would two of these studio monitors in a stereo configuration be a reasonable home entertainment speaker set-up or would I be better off just investing in a more conventional home cinema speaker system?
In stereo, that's certainly a reasonable alternative to amp and stereo speakers.
I think that the weak link in your system would be the DAC. Certainly iPod and laptop won't have a good one. So you could consider adding an external DAC as your next upgrade.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Panasonic HZ2000 OLED TV Review: The best OLED for movie viewing in 2020
Top Bottom