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Can I have a pool table in the loft?

ScouserAndy

Established Member
No way in a standard loft. If you have a proper load bearing floor installed, then probably yes, although 244kg is heavy! Maybe have the bedroom in the loft and pool table in the bedroom....
 

Chox1988

Distinguished Member
on a load bearing floor no problem at all, not even worth a worry but never on anything less than a properly installed floor. How were you planning on getting it up there because we struggled to get a sofa up in ours, unless it would come as a tabletop and legs unassembled?
 

Kristian

Prominent Member
I wouldn't do this in a normal loft without any addition supports in place - i.e. proper conversion. A normal loft floor is not designed to take a lot of weight. It may be 250kg for the table but you'll also have at least another 2 people up there so another 150kg approx.

An ex girlfriend's parents house had a 7x4 [slate bed] pool table in their loft. You could hear the balls dropping down the rails from all over the house though...

Kris.
 

Mrs AutomanUK

Established Member
If you have a large empty loft waiting for a reason (other than keeping rain out) for being there then it's crying out to be a purpose built home cinema.:D Pool/snooker table will end up falling on you in the dead of the night but a cinema... well look no further than the home cinema gallery on this site and grab some serious inspiration !!
 

IronGiant

Moderator
It depends on the building design, in order to save money some joists are specced to just be able to support the roof but very little else (as in last straw breaks the camels back)
 

Kristian

Prominent Member
ok, this may be a muppety moment, but why would it be an issue? aren't the joists in the loft holding the roof up? thats pretty heavy

The weight of the roof is supported on the outside [inner] walls of the house. The bottom, horizontal piece of the truss that creates the floor/ceiling is to tie the ends of the truss together - can't remember the individual parts of the truss/joist. It is not load bearing like proper floor joists.

Kris.
 

robfosters

Established Member
Well I am considering haveing an extension done first and then the loft converted, so there may be room for both a home cinema and a pool table.
 

GasDad

Remembered (1964-2012)
ok, this may be a muppety moment, but why would it be an issue? aren't the joists in the loft holding the roof up? thats pretty heavy

In more detail - the sloping timbers under the roof (the rafters) come together at the top (the ridge) and at the bottom generally rest on a wall plate (a block of wood at the top of the wall) - they are joined together at the bottom by a joist that goes from one side of the roof to the other.

If there is no floor built into the roof when the house is built, all this joist has to do (apart from support a ceiling attached to it), is to stop the roof spreading - it certainly isn't strong enough to support a normal floor.

Older houses (especially Victorian) were over engineered and may have joists that are strong enough - more modern houses won't. You can of course measure your depth of your joists and look up to see if they are strong enough - but remember wood from before the 1940's will be stronger (because is grew more slowly) than more modern timber.

Putting in the new joists, or more usually steel beams (RSJ's) to support new joists is what makes up most of the expense of a loft conversion.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Thanks James :thumbsup: that's what I was trying to say, but badly :D

Dave
 

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