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Can I fix my Philips CRT (dry joints?)

Discussion in 'TVs' started by jon_mendel, May 10, 2005.

  1. jon_mendel

    jon_mendel
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    Hi,

    I've got an old philips TV (there's a couple of numbers on the back - I think the model is BA228723) which sometimes gives the whole of the picture a distinct red tinge; more occasionally, everything goes a little green; this is a particular problem when running the TV off of its scart socket. The TV repair shop I asked about it said some of the internal soldering was probably dry jointed, but wanted to charge me more than I paid for the TV to fix it. When I declined, they helpfully suggested that I try giving it a composite rather than RBG signal through the scart socket - this helped for a time, but now the problem's back. Is there likely to be anything I can do to fix this myself (I got it pretty cheap, and it is an old screen, so I'm reluctant to spend much on the repair...)

    Thanks,

    Jon
     
  2. JayCee

    JayCee
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    Jon,
    What's the model no.....it's not the one you quoted? Philips model nos usually start with the screen size 16, 21, 28 etc followed by a couple of letters.
    To check if it is the scart socket (I take it you have tried a replacement scart plug first!) while watching the pic GENTLY rock the scart plug up and down in it's socket and see if one colour goes missing or if there is a colour cast.
    Can you fix it yourself?......depends if you have any soldering experience....if not don't attempt it.
     
  3. jon_mendel

    jon_mendel
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    Cheers. The two other numbers on the back are TYPE22CE2561/059 and 453327 - is one of those the model number?

    The scart socket ain't quite right - rocking the plug can give a read cast (and yeah, I have tried replacing the plug and using the freeview box with an alt. TV, which was fine). However, it's not just the plug - things can also have a read cast when you've just got the aerial plugged into the TV.

    Soldering experience - um, I've soldered interconnects for myself but haven't done anything more complex for years. How tricky is it likely to be?

    Jon
     
  4. JayCee

    JayCee
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    That really is an old model (22CE2561/059).
    If you are also getting a red cast using the Tv tuner itself that rules out the scart socket as being dry jointed......could be the crt on it's way out or a dry joint elsewhere......I would not advise you to have a go yourself.
    Phone around some local Tv engineers and get a few estimates for a callout to find the cause......or take it to a Tv repair shop yourself.....usually that will be cheaper.
    Good luck
     
  5. jon_mendel

    jon_mendel
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    Thanks Jaycee. tbh, probably just look for a secondhand replacement then - most TV shops in Newcastle seem to charge £30 or so as a minimum; not an unreasonable amount for their time, I guess, but also pretty much what another secondhand TV would cost me. I'd actually got a newer replacement, but it didn't like being near-ish my magnetic speakers (which cause the philips no problems) so had to go; do any makes tend to be more/less sensitive to magnetic fields than others?

    btw, if I do have a try at fixing the TV myself and mess it up is it likely to just not work (no great loss, as it's probably going to be chucked soon anyway) or to go bang (obviously, more of a problem!)?

    Jon
     
  6. ixtlan

    ixtlan
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    Jon, the reason we say don't try it yourself is that TV repair can be deadly for the inexperienced. No other household appliance is as dangerous...

    The internal electronics can hold a charge for days after unplugging, sufficient to injure or even kill you.

    The may seem overly-dramatic... but it's a big risk... you have been warned...

    Ix
     
  7. jon_mendel

    jon_mendel
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    Fair enough - thanks for the advice. I'll leave it then...no point frying myself to save spending 40 quid on a replacement screen. The first time I soldered an interconnect I managed to bodge that, but no harm done there - sounds like TVs could be a much more painful learning curve, though, so best left alone ;)

    Jon
     

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