Can Elevated ALT and AST be related to Strength Training

Mslizas

Novice Member
Hi. I am a 60-year-old female who began a program of strength training including weights at the end of May. I do 50 minutes of strength training on Mondays and Thursdays and walk about a mile and a half-ish and do yoga on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. I can definitely feel it in my muscles. I had routine blood work done on Wednesday after having done the strength training on Monday and walking and yoga on Tuesday. (Nothing Wednesday before the test). Everything normal except ALT was 138 (mildly elevated) and AST was 63 (also mildly elevated). I have read that exercise can cause this. Does anyone know anything or have any experience with this? I have a follow-up with my PCP on Monday, so not looking for medical advice, but just if anyone else has experienced or knows about this. Thanks!! I have been feeling great, by the way!
 

finbaar

Active Member
Simple answer is yes, exercise can cause these blood makers to be elevated - your muscles make these enzymes as well as your liver. Just lay off the exercise for a few days and have a retest, if it isn't normal after this then you have a problem.
The same thing happened to me when I switched to my current GP. They gave you a full medical including bloods. However I'd ran a marathon the day before so it looked like I had a serious liver problem. I was back to normal after a wee rest and then a retest.
I would definitely do the retest otherwise you have an abnormal result on your medical records which will effect applying for things like insurance.
 

Mslizas

Novice Member
Thank you. Just saw my GP, and he agreed it's probably from the weight training, but wants to retest in 6 months while I continue my regular routine. I think he believes as I become used to the routine the levels will go down. Although he just put me on a low-dose of Lipitor which will make them go up as well. (Another reason for the retest) I think I'll lay off the routine for a week before the retest anyway!
 

BlairH

Active Member
This is mildly elevated. It's important to note that there are no super-reliable markers for livery injury and so ALT and AST are substitutes for this. Elevated levels could very well be due to any number of things, so a re-test is prudent.

Approximately 25% of the population have fairly benign NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) and mildly elevated enzymes are commonly seen in this disorder. This can only really be spotted on ultrasound/fibroscan. It is generally controlled (and even cured) by working out, etc so even if you did have this condition; you're on the right track to sort it out.

Can turn into NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) over time, but this usually takes a while. Becomes a lot harder to shift at that stage; but can still be well-controlled.
 

finbaar

Active Member
This is mildly elevated. It's important to note that there are no super-reliable markers for livery injury and so ALT and AST are substitutes for this. Elevated levels could very well be due to any number of things, so a re-test is prudent.

Approximately 25% of the population have fairly benign NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) and mildly elevated enzymes are commonly seen in this disorder. This can only really be spotted on ultrasound/fibroscan. It is generally controlled (and even cured) by working out, etc so even if you did have this condition; you're on the right track to sort it out.

Can turn into NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) over time, but this usually takes a while. Becomes a lot harder to shift at that stage; but can still be well-controlled.
NAFLD doesn't sound benign at all to me! I'd be rather worried if it were me.
 

BlairH

Active Member
NAFLD doesn't sound benign at all to me! I'd be rather worried if it were me.
Whilst it's not ideal; and people who have it should do something about it, we must consider proportionality. About a quarter of the population have it (a consequence of the Western waistline); most without realising. It causes no symptoms; and in the majority of the cases, does not cause further complications.

Ultimately, the only cure for it is diet and exercise.
 

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