Can anyone settle an argument for me?

sparky6899

Standard Member
Been having a discussion with a friend of mine ( I know I'm right but just need someone to backup my opinion).

He reckons his Sony KLV-S40A10E LCD can support 1080p. I've been trying to tell him for ages that it can't - and very few LCDs bought early this year can.

I'm right aren't I?
 

DD3

Novice Member
yes

1366x768 is max resolution so it may do 1080i, but will never be able to display more than 768 lines whereas 1080p needs a 1080 line display.
 

hornydragon

Well-known Member
supporting 1080p may mean capable of excepting 1080p there are philips sets that are 1920x1080 but dont accept 1080p so it depedns of what you mean by support. still odesnt make the picture any good tho
 

thisempty

Novice Member
supporting 1080p may mean capable of excepting 1080p there are philips sets that are 1920x1080 but dont accept 1080p so it depedns of what you mean by support. still odesnt make the picture any good tho
Well, but the guy asked about the Bravia S series, and that is not a 1920x1080 set, so it couldn't mean that.
 
S

SquintingBadger

Guest
Exactly, with the correct equipment you could get 1080p support on a lightbulb. Rubbish picture though.
Likewise you could have a 128M pixel panel that only supports 480p.
 

Bachstrad

Novice Member
But you said that there are philips sets that are 1920x1080 but dont accept 1080p.
If a 1366x768 accepts, how come a 1920x1080 don't?
My 1920 x 1080 Tosh only accepts 1080i, but is does display at 1080p. It just can't handle a native 1080p signal. As Sky HD only outputs 1080i it isn't a problem for me.

ATB

Max
 
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SquintingBadger

Guest
But you said that there are philips sets that are 1920x1080 but dont accept 1080p.
If a 1366x768 accepts, how come a 1920x1080 don't?
The resolution something can display, and the input formats it accepts are unrelated.
 

PeteD64

Novice Member
Sure, but the guy said that a philips 1080p set couldn´t accept 1080p, and thats not true. Thats what i meant
It is true. A lot of so called 1080p sets (i.e. 1920x1080 progressive panels) don't contain the electronics to accept 1080p signals only 1080i which are then de-interlaced to 1080p to be displayed.

This wasn't considered much of an issue until recently by the manufacturers. Probably the only device that could output 1080p 18 months ago was a PC. Now you'll find a handful of upscaling DVD players but I'm not convinced the picture will be any better than 1080i. Similarly there should be HD-DVD/Blu-Ray players that can output 1080p soon but the early ones seem to process in 1080i & back to 1080p.

Also 1080p might not be supported on all inputs, e.g. it might do it over HDMI but not VGA which Xbox 360 HD-DVD owners want.
 

thisempty

Novice Member
It is true. A lot of so called 1080p sets (i.e. 1920x1080 progressive panels) don't contain the electronics to accept 1080p signals only 1080i which are then de-interlaced to 1080p to be displayed.
.

Man, neither does 1366x768!! Thats what i said!!!!!
How can a 1366x768 set accept native 1080p???
 
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panlee

Guest
720p, 1080i and 1080p normally refer to the input source signal. Some however also use 720p for 1366x768 and 1080p for 1920x1080 panel, i.e the native resolution of the panel hardware.

Normally when an HDTV can accept 1080p, means you can plug in an 1080p source directly into one of the terminal of the HDTV and it can display them.

Thus you will have situation where a 1920x1080 panel can accept 1080i signal and not 1080p signal even though we expect them to be. One model come to mind is the older Toshiba 66 series 47 inch.

Likewise, it is possible for 1366x768 panel to accept the higher resolution 1080p signal. In this case the HDTV will scale the resolution down to fit the low resolution of the panel hardware. Only newer 1366x768 HDTV models are now beginning to accept 1080p signal, such as the new Toshiba 68 series. This 1080p support in 1366x768 HDTV is for future proof, let say when you upgrade in future to HD DVD or Blu-ray player which support output signals of 1080p besides 720p and 1080i.

Terrestrial HD programming are in 720 and 1080i and is unlikely in 1080P for many many years to come.
 

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