Can an employer make you cancel your holiday?

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
True, but there maybe something in the contract.

Yes - firms can make the terms more favourable for the employees.
 

captainarchive

Distinguished Member
Not sure if anyone has answered the question but an employer can force an employee to cancel leave but they have to give as much notice as the leave being taken plus an agreed amount on top. I worked in local government so the agreed amount on top was 5 working days; therefore if you took a day off the employer provided 6 working days notice, take a weeek off and you got two weeks notice. I can't remember if everyone is entitled to 5 days notice on top of the amount of leave being taken but knowing local government the principle of providing notice on top is probably based on a legal right to notice.
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
Not sure if anyone has answered the question but an employer can force an employee to cancel leave but they have to give as much notice as the leave being taken plus an agreed amount on top. I worked in local government so the agreed amount on top was 5 working days; therefore if you took a day off the employer provided 6 working days notice, take a weeek off and you got two weeks notice. I can't remember if everyone is entitled to 5 days notice on top of the amount of leave being taken but knowing local government the principle of providing notice on top is probably based on a legal right to notice.

It was linked above - statutory entitlement to cancel is length of leave plus one day

 

tiacat

Member
Likewise. We bid for our leave several months in advance - it works on a points system ,where different weeks have differing values assigned. So Christmas, say, would be worth just 1 point - an unpopular week mid-November, 5.

The points are accumulated on a 4 year basis, so what you bid for 5 years ago doesn't count, and leave is split into summer and winter, with two weeks available in each.

Whoever has the highest points has first dibs, and if your points equal someone else's, then seniority (time-served) trumps. It's very fair, and transparent.

Once awarded/allocated leave, one can swap it with others, but under no circumstances are you allowed to work in it, or be asked to work in it.

As well as being a union thing, it's also a legal thing in our industry to have at least 4 weeks leave per year. We are lucky in that we get a couple of extra weeks 'free of duty', to make up for not getting bank holidays etc. off. We are allowed to work in those - but purely on a voluntary basis, again the company can't ask us to work, but people occasionally pick up some overtime when available.
Sounds like a mensa test. How does anyone know if they can book something later in the year such as for weddings or breaks where they have to arrange around hotels/flights/other family friends etc
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
Sounds like a mensa test. How does anyone know if they can book something later in the year such as for weddings or breaks where they have to arrange around hotels/flights/other family friends etc
In simple terms, you can’t!

A system has been introduced where we can book six days free of duty up to a year ahead. There are a few restrictions; can’t book more than two days in any month, can’t be used over the festive period, and so on. But at least it can guarantee being around for kid’s birthdays, wedding anniversaries and the like.

Just one of the many joys of working for a 24/7 company 365 days a year. It’s not a career for people wanting a stable family life.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
I only say because I used to managed a commercial vodafone contract with shared data across around 400 devices (actually wasn't really my job, but there you go!).

Over use alerts triggered a message to the Director of IT and all the purchasing team had their own access to make those level of changes.

Glad the original OP sorted their holidays, but I would definitely haven't a conversation about what happens in future (maybe put it in your appraisal).
Users have a pass phrase to use with EE to manage their personal devices through the main company contract, but it appears the global password and user list was not shared with anyone, hence we couldn't increase the data on the remote sites.

Joys of working for a small startup that's gone from 0 - £50 million in 6 months, we're all playing catch up the whole time.

Of course, if he'd actually got the new fibre connections to the site set up correctly through the firewalls so that some legacy connections actually worked, we wouldn't have needed to still be using the 4g connections....

We've grown from 3 people to 107 in 6 months, opened 2 satellite sites to accommodate everyone and we're still building our back office systems. Despite all of this, we're trying to be fair to the staff and honour all holidays. I've been covering for the network and comms guy, meaning a few extra hours each day, but really don't mind as these are his first days off this year.

I have made it clear I'm not working over Christmas this year. UAT with a banging hangover while trying to solve user issues is not my idea of a relaxing break...
 

Downinja

Well-known Member
@noiseboy72 fair play. Sounds like it is planned better than it just being handed over issue.

Lots of companies blame handover when the whole setup is wrong in the first place.
 

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