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Can an aerial be too powerful?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by SKiNFreak, Jun 5, 2005.

  1. SKiNFreak

    SKiNFreak
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    I am in the process of maybe getting an new aerial. Simple question: If I get a big 48 element, could this be bad in anyway?Can you get an aerial that is too powerful or would there be any other drawbacks? I take it that most aerials can do FM as well, right?

    THANKS!
     
  2. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    Broadcast FM uses Band II (88-108 MHz). Our terrestrial TV (analogue and digital) uses bands IV and V (around 470-820 MHz).
    SO an aerial designed for TV frequencies won't work (properly) on FM.
    Although compromises exist in the form of dual purpose UHF/VHF-FM aerials , I wouldn't recommend one.
    It's highly unlikely that you could have too high gain an antenna at UHF. A freeview box should have decent enough agc (automatic gain control) to cope with a wide range of signal strengths. Sometimes analogue TVs are poor in this respect - but an inline attenuator solves this problem.

    Chris Muriel, Manchester.
     
  3. moopig

    moopig
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    It's unlikely that your aerial will be too powerful. It is possible to overload the receiver if you have a high gain aerial and live in a strong signal area, but you won't damage your TV and if this were a problem it's easily fixed by fitting an attenuator on the lead where it plugs into your telly. One advantage of larger aerials is that they tend to be more directional so you could find you get less ghosting on analogue.

    TV aerials are tuned to a particular frequency band and aren't designed for FM radio reception. They probably don't make very good FM aerials. However, it might be worth a go!

    moopig
     
  4. Welwynnick

    Welwynnick
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    Yes, you can have too powerful an aerial, but it depends on your locality. I used to live in Thames Ditton which is close to a transmitter. We had very strong signals on some channels, and this seriously degraded the picture quality. The TV was fine, but the colours were very distorted and the line sync was unstable. We got a variable attentuator to drop the signal by about 10dB to restore the PQ. Nobody else had such a decent picture from channel five, though.

    RF aerials are always tuned to the frequency range they work on. A high gain TV aerial won't help with FM. If you want to use a separate external FM aerial, you could try connecting it to the TV aerial down lead with a combiner, then use a splitter in your room. That might help you achieve what you want to do. Separate leads are still best, though, to avoid the risk of corrosion in the extra connectors etc.

    BR, Nick
     

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