Camcorder vs DSLR?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by DinoKustas, Jul 6, 2017.

Tags:
  1. DinoKustas

    DinoKustas
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2013
    Messages:
    148
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +4
    Hi,

    I'm looking to upgrade my old HD video cameras with a new device of sorts, used primarily to capture footage of cars.

    I already have use of 2 x GoPro4s which I will continue to use for interior footage with an external microphone (internal GoPro mic simply does not capture sound accurately IMO and with a lot of scratching noises).

    Therefore decent sound quality is a must, and must be able to capture loud audio. I'd prefer not to have to invest in another external mic.

    4K isn't a must, but good sharp footage, good colours, capture in all sort of exterior lighting conditions, with decent image stabilisation and good zoom/focus abilities. Again as used for car footage the ability to keep up with fast moving objects is a must also.

    Budget is around £500-600. Maybe more if worth it.

    My mind is telling me a good camcorder is a better way to go than the DSLR, but I'd appreciate any input.

    Many thanks!
     
  2. rogs

    rogs
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Messages:
    2,388
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Dorset
    Ratings:
    +384
    DSLRs are probably not a good option for this application for 2 main reasons....

    •Most DSLRs have pretty poor audio capabilities.... often just good enough to sync to externally recorded audio.
    •The 'rolling shutter' scan speeds for DSLRs are often pretty slow, which can give some very odd artifacts on fast moving images.

    So as you suspect, a camcorder will be a better option. As to which model from current ranges, I'll leave that to our expert members, who have a better knowledge of which current models work best with fast moving footage...
     
  3. DinoKustas

    DinoKustas
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2013
    Messages:
    148
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +4
    Many thanks for your post, I'm glad what I thought in my head makes sense!
     
  4. Terfyn

    Terfyn
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,167
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    North Wales UK
    Ratings:
    +248
    One problem is that most camcorders have a 3.5mm TRS socket for an external mic whereas the Go-Pro has, what looks to me, like a USB type connector. So you may need an adapter.
    I use a BOYA BY-VM190P short shotgun, this has an attenuator switch which may help with loud car noise.

    I recently recorded some go-cart racing at a local track. Basically the noise levels are so great that the on board mics picked up the motor noise to the exclusion of everything else.

    As you will see I am a Panasonic fan so my suggestion, within your budget, is the HC-V770. It has the advantage of a hybrid optical image stabiliser with both mechanical and electronic stabilisation. The footage mixes with video from my action cam in post production without problem. I have used my (older) 750 in many different situations with great success.
     
  5. 12harry

    12harry
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,793
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +391
    Do we presume you are recording at Race-track events? ( you don't say).
    From yr Budget, you are not doing this for the Organisation / Reward.
    So, Who will be seeing this footage? Are you planning on Editing it. . . . . ?
    You already have a tall-tripod?
    GoPros are very wide-angle and whilst they have their uses ( Esp car-interior), they may be more-suited to seeing the road . . . whereas if being track-side, a camcorder is likely to be better...ideally one with a "Remote", so you can avoid inducing wobbles into be camera when rolling.

    If audio is really important, then use the camera-audio only for Syncing...and buy a £70-ish digital recorder...Like Zoom. Mics needs a wind-sock/Dead cat, which can be made cheaply using faux-Fur ( although I've yet to source the speckled grey that pros use).
    For "loud-sounds" a moving-coil mic will out-perform common condenser mics ( and don't need a battery).... many camcorders will accept m/c via the 3.5mm jack . . . and in my experience, if the camcorder has a mic-input it will have some "Level" control for manual- audio . . . although keeping AGC "on" is often satisfactory.
    The snag with any extra-gear is finding someone to carry it.
    +You should ( although many don't) use close-back headphones with large muffs, to monitor the audio when setting-up.
    Never use adaptors pushed into camcorders to change jack-sizes. . . far better to have a short cable so no strain is put on the internal pcb.

    Restricting yourself to HD should give "more" for yr Budget; ( Many HD-only models are half their selling prices) - but act quickly, since 4K is becoming the Norm and that is forcing cost-cutting in all departments.
    Consumer camcorder are designed to film family-events, so don't expect "Loud noises" is within their scope . . . . I guess you have to make yr choice on the other features and then fix the Audio, if it needs it.
    For outdoor events protection from Wind-noise needs a serious fix.... Pros use blimps covered in faux-fur. This applies to camcorders that will record disastrous audio. Ignore any electronic Wind- NR menu-options.

    Fill-in details - and let us know how things work out
     
  6. chrishull3

    chrishull3
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2006
    Messages:
    4,029
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Location:
    Yeovil
    Ratings:
    +285
  7. DinoKustas

    DinoKustas
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2013
    Messages:
    148
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +4
    Nice detailed response, thank you!

    Subaru Impreza WRX STi with Blitz Nur Spec R...

    400bhp Subaru Impreza WRX STi sideways @...

    2016 Subaru WRX STi vs Honda Civic Type R EP3...

    Mazda MX-5 1.8i Turbo - Wet Curborough Sprint...

    GC8 Subaru Impreza WRX STi 2.5 VF43 anti lag...
     
  8. Terfyn

    Terfyn
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,167
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    North Wales UK
    Ratings:
    +248
    The point is that when you film car racing (karts in my case) the cars stay relatively still in the frame and it is the background that races past. Good sharp pictures will be the norm in HD but I suggest you look for a camera with Optical Image Stabilisation for any hand held work.
    I would suggest you pick up a shotgun type mic if you are doing any distance work.
     
  9. DinoKustas

    DinoKustas
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2013
    Messages:
    148
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +4
    Many thanks, what would be the benefit of a shotgun mic? Does it pic up distant direction sound better?
     
  10. Terfyn

    Terfyn
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2,167
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    North Wales UK
    Ratings:
    +248
    Should do - plus it should also cut out any noise from the side or rear. They are not perfect but may perform better than the on board mics.
     
  11. 12harry

    12harry
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2010
    Messages:
    4,793
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +391
    Shotgun
    I agree they might do....but they need carful handling and are not particularly good at loud-noises.... since their whole purpose is to reach-out for sound at a distance.
    At the very least, for outdoor events you will need a blimp+dead-cat to prevent wind-noise . . handling is mostly a matter of experience . . . but don't attach to the camera.... unless this is a 1-person shoot.
    I'd be inclined to worry about the camcorder first and only go for expensive mics IF it becomes a problem. Recording Audio on a dedicated digitial recorder is the way Pros do things . . . otherwise use an external moving-coil mic + blimp+dead-cat - unless you are seated at some distance from the track (( DO we know this position? )) . . . but then the noise-level may be acceptable for the internal mic . . . and you will add the crowd reactions as well.

    Good luck.
     
  12. DinoKustas

    DinoKustas
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2013
    Messages:
    148
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Ratings:
    +4
    I appreciate all of the advice, thank you.

    I'm hoping to get a new PC this month and once all set up I'll pick myself up a new camcorder.
     
  13. andjarnic

    andjarnic
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2017
    Messages:
    50
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    US
    Ratings:
    +4
    Little late... but I would consider the Sony AX53.. it has some of the best image stabilization for a camcorder and shoots at 4K. It has a decent mic, but like others say.. at the very least add a mic to the camera and plug it in to get better sound. I would also say an external recorder (possibly with XLR inputs and on board mics) that has an output as well to feed to the camera to allow for very easy audio syncing. I have a Zoom H6 which comes with two mics as well as 4 XLR inputs. It isnt super cheap, but it gives you options to expand and experiment with different and/or multiple mics.. which may do you good so you can get audio from different advantage points.

    The Sony records up to 120fps in HD and 4K30p at a decent quality codec. Consider transcoding the footage to DNxHR or ProRes to edit it better before your final render.

    The Panasonic 991 is another great camera and 4K shooter. Like another said, 4K is quickly becoming the norm and 8K is already in the near early release stages with a LOT of people shooting 8K video now, crazy as that seems.

    As for a PC, given the new AMD Ryzen and ThreadRipper setups, I would seriously give them a consider (if you arent already). You get a lot more bang for your buck for video editing setup with the new AMD cpus (and gpus). You can get a decent rig set up for under $1700 or so that will churn through 4K video (after you transcode), or if you spring for the Threadripper setup with a good GPU for 3K or so, you can even work with 8K video (yah..I realize you may not even be using 4K at this point.. just pointing it out). Look to put in 32GB of RAM, and definitely get at least one NVMe Samsung 960 EVO SSD drive as your main OS boot drive. For the money, it is the fastest SSD you can get. I boot up in to windows in 3 or so seconds. I also would consider a secondary SSD drive for editing work.. e.g. put your temporary files on it while working on a project. Usually a 512GB to 1TB drive will work well for a larger HD project or smaller 4K project. I also tend to use external SSD drives via a USB 3.1 (Gen 2.. 10Gbps USB C connection) and SATA3 dock bay. Almost as fast as having them inside, plus the advantage of hot swap and can plug in my multi-terabyte 3.5" HDs for backup copies when I dont want to go over the network to my NAS.
     

Share This Page

Loading...