Calibration for dummies

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs Forum' started by johnbower, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. johnbower

    johnbower
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    So i put the AVSHD709 into my ST50 and went to the basic settings

    OK so black clipping no problem only 17 and above flashing.

    APL clipping and again no problem 19 to 28 flash and just barely able to see 19.

    White clipping??? its all flashing no matter what so how can you set it???

    can't do this next one flashing colour bars i assume as i don't have a blue filter but then again no idea what one is and where to get one.

    So onto Sharpness with sharpness at min nothing happens turn up to say two clicks and a couple of the patterns change but nothing like is explained in manual so don't understand this one.

    Anyway so i ran the A3 colour step seemed OK then the A4 colour clipping seemed OK.

    I then went into the 100% white and played around with the white balance settings until it looked really white then i clicked into true cinema and the picture was anything but white it looked almost copper in colour anyway i messed around with the white balance again until it looked white.

    Now when i go into play my hd material on sky it looks better than ever and a great deal better than the settings i did have but i have no idea what i am doing???

    I like the look of a calibrated set if a dummy can get this result by just fiddling around.

    But is there anyone who can explain how to use AVSHD709 to just do a small bit of calibration in plain english or for dummies as don't know what to do i like the picture i have but would like to fine tune but do not know what steps to take and searching on the web just gets more confusing guides.
     
  2. fluxo

    fluxo
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    I have been assured that min is the neutral (least artificial) setting and it's what I use (GT50).
     
  3. StevieBuck

    StevieBuck
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    The White Clipping pattern helps you identify the max contrast setting before clipping occurs. The fact that all bars are flashing even at the highest setting means you don’t have an issue with clipping.

    Two further tests can be used to identify the ideal contrast setting. One is to measure the light output of the display from a 100% white pattern, to ensure it lies within an acceptable range for the display type (you have different ranges for LCD, CRT, plasma). If you have it set too high, you can decrease the life of the display significantly and increase power consumption.

    The second test is to check the white balance with a 100% white pattern - this will begin to distort on some displays at higher contrast settings. Both of these tests however require a light meter and suitable calibration software to perform them accurately.

    To be honest, without a meter and calibration software there isn’t really much more you can do with the AVS disc. It’s designed for use with calibration packages, hence why you have the various sub-sections for CalMAN, ChromaPure and ColorHCFR software.

    I can personally recommend ChromaPure - I use it along with a Spyder3 Pro meter. I purchased it from Ricky at Kalibrate Ltd, who are an assured advertiser on the forum. The Spyder3 has since been replaced with the Spyder4 - the updated package is available here:

    ChromaPure & Datacolor Spyder4 | Kalibrate Limited
     
  4. johnbower

    johnbower
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    So how do you set the white balance or is that a no go without proper equipment too?
     
  5. StevieBuck

    StevieBuck
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    Yes, you need a light meter to measure white balance - it’s impossible to do it accurately by eye.

    Typically when calibrating a TV, you would use the meter to check the default white balance on each of the temperature presets (cool, standard, warm, etc) and choose the one that gives the closest to neutral white. You then use the advanced picture settings (red, green & blue cutoff/gain settings) to dial it in further.

    Without a meter, the best you can do is guess the closest colour temperature preset.
     

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