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Buying a house can open your eyes.

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
I am not actually buying a house but there is a flat in my block this is up for sale and I happen to know there are major issues which any potential buyer should be aware of so I looked at the Home Report and that is where I had my eyes opened as I thought this would be where the surveyor would have reported the problems.
There is mould in practically every room because a couple of the double glazed window units have failed, but the owner had the place redecorated throughout and it looks pretty good.
Boiler is in some serious need of repair or replacement a fact that the owner is fully aware of.

How do they get away with this sort of survey as some fool is going to pay £135,000, which is about £25,000 over priced, and then come upon these issues later. What would be their rights?

I also noted and I suppose this sort of thing is expected the estate agents views on the area in which the flat is situated. They say "I would say that Restalrig is as yet an “undiscovered gem” within Edinburgh and, will sooner rather than later become a desirable area for affordable housing." What a load of b******s apart from the fact this flat is not in the Restalrig area even though it is in Restalrig Drive, this is a pretty naff area and always will be.

Flat in question.
 

Doug the D

Distinguished Member
I got bitten when we bought our first house 3 years ago. The seller explained to us that he was an ex-plumber and he'd taken care of the solar panel water heater system that we looked at in the airing cupboard during the viewing. He explained that he'd put new fluid in and it should be good for 10 years (the house was 9 years old when we moved in)
Last year, I noticed that the system wasn't working correctly (not heating water with the boiler off on a sunny day). I called some heating engineers out who told me that the fluid within the solar panel and associated pipes had never been changed and was now in a tar-like state. There was nothing they could do to clean the system through, so I had to make a decision; they either cap the system off and we never use it (leaving the solar panel on the roof), or we get the whole system replaced. As the cost of doing the latter will never pay for itself, I've gone for the first option.

I don't believe I have any recourse with the seller from 3 years ago, but I'm fairly certain that this will impact the selling price when we move. The wife thinks not, but it's a negative imo.

I'll be chalking this one up to experience - if I ever buy another house with solar panels, I'll be asking to see the paperwork that shows maintenance, same goes for anything else that needs regular attention, like the boiler.
 

aVdub

Distinguished Member
Lets not also forget that estate agents don't have to go off and qualify to be able to sell homes.
A degree in bullsh*t is all that is required ;)
 
A home report is not a structural survey to my knowledge. I did not want to register to view it, but I don't see what the OP is remarking has anything to do with it, and there may be a bit of confusion at play regarding expectations.
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
Is the survey saying mould or damp?

Double glazing units to fail would mean there is an ingress of water?
That's just it the survey does not mention the faults in the windows or the mould which is not evident as the owner has had the whole place decorated.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
How could the survey mention mould that is not currently apparent? :confused:
 

koeman

Well-known Member
Homebuyers survey is basically someone saying that house is worth the amount you're paying. They do no checks, some surveyors don't even go in the property.

Onus is on the buyer to select the correct level of survey.
 

Dony

Distinguished Member
Has the flat been redecorated or refurbished? Looking at the building, the windows to the right of the front door are different to those on the left. At some point those have been changed.
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
Not being a surveyor or professing to have any knowledge of what processes are involved in in surveying a house/flat, I am pretty sure that on buying the property I would not like, a few months down the line, I find that there are expensive issues to address, equally :confused:
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
Looking at the building, the windows to the right of the front door are different to those on the left. At some point those have been changed.
They would be as they are two different flats and yes it has recently been redecorated, the young couple renting the property moved out because of the issues given mould can pose a health risk especially yo young children, they had a one year old. The owner, a real nice guy but as tight as a ducks rear end has decided to sell rather I guess spend cash to fix the issues.
 

leedebs

Well-known Member
Even some types of surveys have caveats to get them out of confirming the property is ok, ie cannot access loft area or under floorboards etc
Therefore no comeback on them
 

Doug the D

Distinguished Member
£135k...Property values blow my mind.
That price seems incredibly high imo. I'd think it high if it was here in Dorset, but in Scotland...I thought property was cheaper up north?
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
That price seems incredibly high imo. I'd think it high if it was here in Dorset, but in Scotland...I thought property was cheaper up north?
Central Edinburgh is very expensive but this is a silly price for the area in my opinion but I know nothing of buying and selling of houses or how prices are decided on. Lets not forget the council was flogging these off for £10,000 if you had lived in it long enough which is what we paid for mine.
 

reiteration

Member
That price seems incredibly high imo. I'd think it high if it was here in Dorset, but in Scotland...I thought property was cheaper up north?

overall it is, but there are hot spots in parts of Newcastle min places like darras hall (where the likes of alan shearer live etc), and Jesmond, Gosforth etc... but out in places in the smaller towns then there are lots of cheap places.. :)
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Not being a surveyor or professing to have any knowledge of what processes are involved in in surveying a house/flat, I am pretty sure that on buying the property I would not like, a few months down the line, I find that there are expensive issues to address, equally :confused:
Then you shouldn't rely on a homebuyers report. Which, as the "Up and coming area" comment discloses is not really there to help out a future buyer. You would be recommended to get your own surveyor in to do a full inspection if you wanted to know what the potential pitfalls are. Even then, they still probably wouldn't spot there is an underlying mould issue if the decorators have treated it and then covered it up.
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
I am not actually buying a house but there is a flat in my block this is up for sale and I happen to know there are major issues which any potential buyer should be aware of so I looked at the Home Report and that is where I had my eyes opened as I thought this would be where the surveyor would have reported the problems.
There is mould in practically every room because a couple of the double glazed window units have failed, but the owner had the place redecorated throughout and it looks pretty good.
Boiler is in some serious need of repair or replacement a fact that the owner is fully aware of.

How do they get away with this sort of survey as some fool is going to pay £135,000, which is about £25,000 over priced, and then come upon these issues later. What would be their rights?

I also noted and I suppose this sort of thing is expected the estate agents views on the area in which the flat is situated. They say "I would say that Restalrig is as yet an “undiscovered gem” within Edinburgh and, will sooner rather than later become a desirable area for affordable housing." What a load of b******s apart from the fact this flat is not in the Restalrig area even though it is in Restalrig Drive, this is a pretty naff area and always will be.

Flat in question.
Then you shouldn't rely on a homebuyers report. Which, as the "Up and coming area" comment discloses is not really there to help out a future buyer. You would be recommended to get your own surveyor in to do a full inspection if you wanted to know what the potential pitfalls are. Even then, they still probably wouldn't spot there is an underlying mould issue if the decorators have treated it and then covered it up.
Whereas the mould is probably hidden for now the windows and boiler are not and there are faults in both.
I again repeat that I have no experience with buying houses so it is news to me that a buyer also has a survey done and I would suspect a bit more detailed?
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I again repeat that I have no experience with buying houses so it is news to me that a buyer also has a survey done and I would suspect a bit more detailed?
I don't know what the procedure is in Scotland, nor have I bought in England recently but when we last bought there were several grades of report:
The simple valuation is really just for the Building Society to reassure them that you are paying what the property is worth. It's unlikely to highlight any issues at all unless they are glaringly obvious.
Have a look here for the others:

Buying a house is a minefield, hence the "sponsored by Prozax" thread we have had on the process. Have a read of that, you'll find it even more of an eye opener :thumbsup:
 

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