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Burn-in or "Image Persistence"

Turbocharged5

Standard Member
Hi All,

Since I play a LOT of video games. I have concerns relating to Burn-in. I'm hoping to purchase a new TV soon and this is a real issue for me.

From all my research:

The worst seems to be the plasmas, I've seen this on my mates Philips unit which is now scared from several hours of Zelda playing.

It turns out that LCDs can also suffer a form of Burn-in only they call it "Image Persistence." Although LCDs apparently are able to recover from it much better than a Plasma screen.

My question now is: How are DLP Rear Projection TV's affected. Do they suffer burn-in, or Image Persistence?

Cheers
 

Jonesey

Novice Member
Turbocharged 5,

You can go onto the www.dlp.com website and they have all the info you need about burn in. They clearly state that this will not happen and you wont have to worry about screen savers and screen wipes like plasmas. All to do with that the image is reflected on mirrors...something like that!

Regards.
 

NicolasB

Well-known Member
Turbocharged5 said:
It turns out that LCDs can also suffer a form of Burn-in only they call it "Image Persistence." Although LCDs apparently are able to recover from it much better than a Plasma screen.
"Image persistence" and "screen-burn" really aren't the same thing. The effect you see with an LCD screen (if you do) is always short-term. There is no long-term screen-burn possible on anything which doesn't use phosphors.

So you will get it on direct-view CRT, CRT projectors, CRT rear-projection, plasma and SED devices. You won't get it on LCD, DLP, LCOS/SXRD/DILA, or OLED.
 

hifiboom

Standard Member
no burn-in, with a Dlp you can show a single picture for three days on you display without any burn-in.. This would be a killer for any Plasma....

As I know LCDs do not suffer from this problem.... As LCD is same technology as computer LCD/TFT, where you mostly have a static picture...

LCD only loose colour quality over the years....I think burn-in is not a big problem with LCD....but you`ll never see a big one for a cheap price...

There will come out bigger LCD in the near future and I think the LCD/DLP is the future of displays....

The Plasmas burn-in and blacklevel are just too bad for the price...
 

Turbocharged5

Standard Member
Hi NicolasB,

From what I've read... your right. "Image persistence" and "screen-burn" are not the same thing, they just have similar effects.

Like you say, "Screen-burn" occurs on phosphor and plasma based screens because that light cell is being used more than the adjacent cells. They're effectively being warn out quicker - the effect is a shadow of the "burnt" image.

Where as "Image persistence" is due to a memory effect in the liquid crystal. The result is that individual pixels may, for a short period of time, become unable to switch. This can be seen as colour staining, i.e. a blue pixel is unable to switch off staining that pixel with the colour blue (apparently most commonly seen on LCD screens used on PC's where the blue task bar is permanently on at of the bottom). In general LCDs will recover in time.

Where I am confused is, I thought some rear projection TV's used a phosphor on the back of their screens in order to brighten the image. If that is the case - as you rightfully pointed out. Anything using phosphor can be subject to "burn-in."

Do rear projection screens use phosphor or anything else of that nature on the back of the screen (projection surface)?


Cheers
:)
 

Turbocharged5

Standard Member
Hi hifiboom,

I believe all TV/Monitors are subject to lose of colour quality and brightness over time.

Plasma's will fade due to the fact the plasma cells are being warn out and hence will gradually become dimmer. Unfortunately there is no way of fixing this as far as I know without replacing the plasma screen.

LCDs will fade as the back-light unit begins to age. These are in theory fixable, providing its still possible to get hold of the back lights.

DLP's will fade as the bulb ages. These are the easiest to fix though :), just replace the bulb.


Now that we are on the bulb replacement subject, I'd be interested in knowing what the typical cost is of bulbs for the more popular DLPs and has anyone ever replaced one?

Also, whilst I'm at it... Since DLPs use mirror technology to reflect light. How are they affected by dust build up on the DLP surface?
 

Son of Shaft

Standard Member
Turbocharged5 said:
Hi hifiboom,

I believe all TV/Monitors are subject to lose of colour quality and brightness over time.

Plasma's will fade due to the fact the plasma cells are being warn out and hence will gradually become dimmer. Unfortunately there is no way of fixing this as far as I know without replacing the plasma screen.

LCDs will fade as the back-light unit begins to age. These are in theory fixable, providing its still possible to get hold of the back lights.

DLP's will fade as the bulb ages. These are the easiest to fix though :), just replace the bulb.


Now that we are on the bulb replacement subject, I'd be interested in knowing what the typical cost is of bulbs for the more popular DLPs and has anyone ever replaced one?

Also, whilst I'm at it... Since DLPs use mirror technology to reflect light. How are they affected by dust build up on the DLP surface?
Plasma image quality deteriorates because phosphor wears out. Only fixable by replacing the whole screen.
LCD image deteriorates because organic colour wears out. Backlight wears out. Backlight is easy replaceable if the same type of light is still available. Colour wear-out => screen needs to be replaced.

DLP. lightbulb can wear out. easy replaceable. Prices are around €200,- to €450,-. Most bulbs are in a frame that you can slide in or out.I think the trickiest part is opening the TV set to reach it. Colourwheel engine can wear out. Should also be reasonably easy to replace. But I think it needs to be realigned/timed. Don't know what prices are for replacement parts. DLP chip can break or wear out => board replacement. No idea of prices for that one.

Dust in your set can get on a lens or the dlp chip and then you could see it in your image. If dust gets between mirrors it can get a mirror stuck or break it. But those chances are very slim because fan intakes (should) have filters and the airflow in the set should pickup dust and get it away from the light engine.

Got a board replacement because of a half stuck mirror but that was in warranty so don't know the cost.
 

NicolasB

Well-known Member
Turbocharged5 said:
Where I am confused is, I thought some rear projection TV's used a phosphor on the back of their screens in order to brighten the image. If that is the case - as you rightfully pointed out. Anything using phosphor can be subject to "burn-in."

Do rear projection screens use phosphor or anything else of that nature on the back of the screen (projection surface)?
There are such things as CRT rear-projection TVs - a bit like one of the big 3-tube CRT front-projectors internally. These used to be quite common, but are fairly rare now - rear-pro sets these days are more commonly LCD- or (increasingly) DLP-based.
 

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