Bumper restoration

Discussion in 'Motoring' started by Stu V, Jun 13, 2018.

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  1. Stu V

    Stu V
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    D1E30287-5FA3-4271-9246-4BC3C14625B5.jpeg I’ve attached a picture of my rear bumper of my car, a BMW 3 series estate. As you can see the plastic is marked, caused by our dogs jumping in and out. I’ve run my fingernail along it and can feel no indentations or ridges so it is not actually scratched. Any suggestions as to how to restore the bumper or am I am looking at a professional repair?
     
  2. un1eash

    un1eash
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    If its the top of the bumper I'd whack a rear guard bumper protector on.
     
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  3. Stu V

    Stu V
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    Should have mentioned that I am looking to change it, hence I would like to restore it although a protector would at least cover it. Thanks
     
  4. Arcam_boy

    Arcam_boy
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    I would be very surprised if they’ll all come out some look unite deep.

    If you just want to “tart” it up and make it look better something like poor boys black hole contains fillers and will cover quite a few of the scratches as a temporary measure.

    If you want something a little more permanent then a decent polish with cutting pad will be required - there are hundreds of options to choose

    For an even better job a wet sand and polish would remove a good 90/95% of those marks but would most likely require a pro to do it for you

    A machine polisher with a 3” pad would do a much better job than trying to do it by hand but again might not be something easy to come by if you don’t have one! You can apply the poor boys by hand but it’ll take a little work for it to work it’s best!
     
  5. IronGiant

    IronGiant
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