Bt discs help

TheFridge

Active Member
Good evening folks,
I am looking for some advise. I recently bought some BT discs on amazon. They were used like new... (might be the issue)
I have one that is furthest from the router that is going from blue to orange all the time, its driving me mad. I bought 3 discs. Have one 20ft from router in the middle and the problem area one is a further 15-20ft.
I have moved the disc, swapped them around and it's still the same.
I can't use homeplugs as its a different fuse board in this extension and cannot get an ethernet from the router to the ps4 due to locations.

I mostly want to hard wire for online gaming.

Should I return them? And if I do are there better options out there that will be stronger that won't break the bank.

Thanks
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
It’s hard to advise without seeing it. What happens if you swap the middle and furthest discs around? Is the one still furthest away problematic?
How old is the extension?
 

TheFridge

Active Member
The problem stays in the same spot. But I have relocated in that room too.. The extension is new. Compete rewire back to a new fuse board. Its not huge. I'd expect no issues as I have some in my partners house that travel a lot further.
But if I move it's stays in same spot. Only suspect all faulty which is unlikely. Its strange
 

cjed

Well-known Member
Are these the original BT discs, or the Mini discs ? It sounds as though the signal from the middle to furthest disc is not getting through as well as from the router disc to the middle disc. How many walls (if any) are in the way ? It doesn't sound as though any of the discs are faulty if swapping them round gives the same behaviour.
 

TheFridge

Active Member
They are the original ones. There is only one wall, it's very frustrating. I'm tempted to go for a different option. Any suggestions. Many seem very happy with the bt though and I am in partners house
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
A lot of new construction, including stud walls use foil backed plasterboard, which kills WiFi signals.
 

neilball

Well-known Member
I doubt anything is broken, especially if discs work when placed on the other locations. It sounds like you’ve picked a bad location for the one disc where the radio signals are just not reaching with the other discs in their locations.

If this is the case then you need to find an alternative location that avoids whatever is currently blocking your signal. If it is something locally blocking the radio signals then simply replacing the equipment with another brand will not fix the problem either.

Don’t be misled into thinking there is anything significantly different between different brands of mesh wifi, or that mesh wifi is any different to normal wifi extenders - they all have to work using the same radio systems and standards (including max signal strength), so while their antenna placement and size may make small differences it will not magically solve all wifi issues.

If you have an area in the house that somehow screens the wifi signal from the rest of the house then you need to look at an alternative method of backhaul from that location to the rest of your network - wired ethernet or powerline - to get around the issue.
 

TheFridge

Active Member
Thank you for the replies. Yes very intermittent so annoying.
Yeah I am one who can easily get sucked into specs etc. I think a router might be a better option. The isp router is crap and I sold my ac88u.
Try run an outdoor ethernet cable if I can. Few options to look at but defo isp (eir ireland) is a crappy router.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
Running a outdoor cable is always a good option if you can. It will offer you much more flexibility.
 

neilball

Well-known Member
A wired connection will give you a guaranteed gigabit-capable link back to the network, without any of the issues of wireless links. You can easily add the wifi AP on the far end once the cable is installed.

I’m not sure why you think your ISP router will be the cause of issues when you are running a separate independent wifi setup unless you have a very large network (lots of devices) the the existing router is running out of resources to manage so many devices.
 

TheFridge

Active Member
A wired connection will give you a guaranteed gigabit-capable link back to the network, without any of the issues of wireless links. You can easily add the wifi AP on the far end once the cable is installed.

I’m not sure why you think your ISP router will be the cause of issues when you are running a separate independent wifi setup unless you have a very large network (lots of devices) the the existing router is running out of resources to manage so many devices.
Worried the router is just flaky. Its independant but my understanding is its still getting its signal from the isp one.
I will have to try figure out a cable but this is going to be very tricky 🙈🙈. Its in the middle of the house in a hall.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
If you have your ISP routers Wi-Fi enabled and the BT discs, it may be that they are competing with each other as in heterogeneous equipment mixes, Wi-Fi AP's do not in any way "talk" to each other to do things like establish a non-conflicting radio channel plan. A homogeneous managed "fleet" of AP's such as "whole home" and (appalling named) so-called "mesh" systems may be communicating amongst themselves to optimise RF usages, but they won't be interacting with your ISP router's in built AP. You might try experimenting with turning the ISP routers Wi-Fi off if you don't need it and see if it's makes any difference.

As others have indicated, Wi-Fi transmit power is limited by law (and is pretty weak by design) and most kit is, and always has been, at or close to the permitted max. Clever antenna designs can do things to increase the perceived signal strength in some directions (to the detriment of others) but fundamentally there's no "magic" routers out there with "much better signal strength" than everyone one else's.

In any case, Wi-Fi is a two-way radio "conversation" like walkie-talkies, not one way radio "lecture" like television. If you have something obstructing the AP--client signals, then it will equally obstruct the client---AP signals, so making the AP "louder" (even if it were possible) would not necessarily "fix" the problem - you need to remove the obstructions and/or get the communicating peers closer together. Some AP's can do some funky stuff with the antenna design and orientation (and in the signal processing in the chips) but generally there's no silver bullets here. If there was a "magic" AP that was much better than everyone else's we'd all be buying them!
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
I just finished running an external cable for a client today connected to a Ubiquiti AP. We took his WiFi from 8Mb/s to 150Mbs across the back of his property. The 8Mbs was from a Virgin WiFi booster. The reality is that often the only real solution is a cable. Bite the bullet and work out a route. Think about running behind skirting if necessary. It’s an hours job to pop skirting off and re-fix it. Not everything relies on chasing walls.
 

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