Boundary changes review.

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
One thing puzzles me. At Westminster there is roughly one MP to every 100,000 constituents, while the Welsh devolved Parliament (the Senedd), with fewer responsibilities, has one member for every 50,000 and there is discussion about increasing the number of members from 60 to 90 (one for every 35,000).

By those standards England looks drastically under-represented!
I would assume that Welsh MPs would have to cover larger geographical areas to match the ratio of an English MP, due to the higher average population density in England.
 

Tropical Wave

Active Member
This is the totally bizarre split of the Isle of Wight into two constituencies:
1623322424643.png
 

Tropical Wave

Active Member
I can only presume its to try and get two equally sized constituencies of the correct size relative to the rest of the UK.
Yes but they way they've split it is very weird.
I did read they've split a town, is that Cowes?

East Cowes is a separate town to (West) Cowes which would be in different constituencies. The town that would be split is my hometown of Newport. I would be in the "West" and across town would be "East".
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
Yes but they way they've split it is very weird.


East Cowes is a separate town to (West) Cowes which would be in different constituencies. The town that would be split is my hometown of Newport. I would be in the "West" and across town would be "East".
Does seem odd they couldn't have left the bigger towns together.
 

Tropical Wave

Active Member
Does seem odd they couldn't have left the bigger towns together.
Yes to have the county town is split in two and the outskirts of Ryde (largest town situated in North East) is in the West constituency. There is a local Vectis Party here and this is their views:

 

Aristaeus

Well-known Member
No idea if a coincidence or not. If it evens up the numbers so be it. Course who decides where the new boundaries are has a bearing I guess.

As said, we were promised a reduction in MP’s. 650 lol. Such a big gravy train.

I couldn’t give a **** though. Never voting Tory (and of course not Labour either) ever again anyway.

It doesn't actually matter if the numbers are even in each ward, as a general election is essentially 650 separate elections. Each constituency election is it's own self-contained election.

The idea that an MP in a densely populated area of london should have the same number of registered voters as an MP in the Scottish highlands is plainly stupid.
 

MrsArcanum

Well-known Member
Any claims of trying to keep local seem to be erroneous in many cases. Locally they have split our District in two and dragged in unrelated areas that have no connection.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
It doesn't actually matter if the numbers are even in each ward, as a general election is essentially 650 separate elections. Each constituency election is it's own self-contained election.

The idea that an MP in a densely populated area of london should have the same number of registered voters as an MP in the Scottish highlands is plainly stupid.
Not entirely sure I follow.

Each voter should have as equal a voice, representation by an MP, as any other, irrespective of where they live.

So each constituency should have as close to the average number of voters as possible.

Are you saying you think Londoner's should have less say in things like parliamentary votes?

I may have entirely misunderstood your post.

My view is bin this for proportional representation of some kind, don't like safe seats as an opposition vote is worthless.
 

Smudges Dad

Well-known Member
Not entirely sure I follow.

Each voter should have as equal a voice, representation by an MP, as any other, irrespective of where they live.

So each constituency should have as close to the average number of voters as possible.

Are you saying you think Londoner's should have less say in things like parliamentary votes?

I may have entirely misunderstood your post.

My view is bin this for proportional representation of some kind, don't like safe seats as an opposition vote is worthless.
There needs to be some recognition of the practicalities of very large constituencies. My constituency is about 12,000 km2 while Islington North is 7.35km2. One takes at least 5 hours driving to cross on a good day without any tourists, the other can be walked across in under an hour.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
There needs to be some recognition of the practicalities of very large constituencies. My constituency is about 12,000 km2 while Islington North is 7.35km2. One takes at least 5 hours driving to cross on a good day without any tourists, the other can be walked across in under an hour.
I don't agree, everyone should have equal representation as possible, otherwise you have a greater say in the decisions made in this country than a person in Islington North.

One gender neutral entity, one vote.
 

Smudges Dad

Well-known Member
I don't agree, everyone should have equal representation as possible, otherwise you have a greater say in the decisions made in this country than a person in Islington North.

One gender neutral entity, one vote.
Do you think the IoW should be split so that one of its constituencies is part on the Island and part in the mainland, to keep equal constituency numbers?
 

Rapa Nui

Member
2019 notional results for England based on the proposed boundary changes:
CON: 351 MPs (+6)
LAB: 179 (-)
LDEM: 11 (+4)
GRN: 1 (-)
SPKR: 1 (-)
Chgs. w/ GE2019 result, Eng only

 

Belzok

Well-known Member
Do you think the IoW should be split so that one of its constituencies is part on the Island and part in the mainland, to keep equal constituency numbers?
There's always going to be a little give and take but getting as close to the same voters per MP is the goal.

Its going to be a bell curve with the vast majority of constituencies in the middle, and to to reduce the outliers as much as possible.

We've had silly constituencies before, Scotland was massively over represented until the change 15 years ago I think.
 

Smudges Dad

Well-known Member
There's always going to be a little give and take but getting as close to the same voters per MP is the goal.

Its going to be a bell curve with the vast majority of constituencies in the middle, and to to reduce the outliers as much as possible.

We've had silly constituencies before, Scotland was massively over represented until the change 15 years ago I think.
Well, there’s an easy way to get rid of the Scottish problem and reduce the number of MPs by 59😌
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
Well, there’s an easy way to get rid of the Scottish problem and reduce the number of MPs by 59😌
Umm didn't say that, the massive over representation was mainly dealt with, it's much fairer now. I think Wales and NI do the best for representation right now.

I'm not really quite sure why there is any question that each MP should represent as similar amount of voters as possible.

That's ignoring any gerrymandering of course but that's always going to be a problem for FPTP.
 

joemco

Standard Member
There's always going to be a little give and take but getting as close to the same voters per MP is the goal.

Its going to be a bell curve with the vast majority of constituencies in the middle, and to to reduce the outliers as much as possible.

We've had silly constituencies before, Scotland was massively over represented until the change 15 years ago I think.
If it's about representation then why do it based on registered voters and not on population. Does the MP not represent people under 18 or those who hadn't yet registered to vote? What about the people in the constituency who aren't eligible to vote, doesn't the MP represent them too?
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
If it's about representation then why do it based on registered voters and not on population. Does the MP not represent people under 18 or those who hadn't yet registered to vote? What about the people in the constituency who aren't eligible to vote, doesn't the MP represent them too?
Huh? Sounds like complete whataboutery, electoral role is a perfectly adequate measure.

We have a age restriction on voting, I think it's a reasonable age.

Maybe tweak it to something like 18 or over 16 who've worked for a year, for some adult life experience, and recognising that they're working.

Personally don't want students having the vote as they haven't had any responsibilities in their life and are for the most part quite naive.
 

jjwales

Active Member
Huh? Sounds like complete whataboutery, electoral role is a perfectly adequate measure.

We have a age restriction on voting, I think it's a reasonable age.

Maybe tweak it to something like 18 or over 16 who've worked for a year, for some adult life experience, and recognising that they're working.

Personally don't want students having the vote as they haven't had any responsibilities in their life and are for the most part quite naive.
Whatever you may think about students, they have to be treated the same as anyone else as regards voting age. You can't start discriminating against people just because they're not in employment.

I was also surprised that the size of constituencies is based on the electoral roll rather than population, given that MPs are supposed to represent everyone in their constituency. Though I suppose it doesn't matter if the ratio between the two things is roughly the same throughout the country.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
Whatever you may think about students, they have to be treated the same as anyone else as regards voting age. You can't start discriminating against people just because they're not in employment.

I was also surprised that the size of constituencies is based on the electoral roll rather than population, given that MPs are supposed to represent everyone in their constituency. Though I suppose it doesn't matter if the ratio between the two things is roughly the same throughout the country.
I'm a big fan of contributing before you get to have a say.

I really don't see why a student agent 18 can vote when someone who's been working, and gained far more life skills, can't vote.
 

jjwales

Active Member
I'm a big fan of contributing before you get to have a say.

I really don't see why a student agent 18 can vote when someone who's been working, and gained far more life skills, can't vote.

Because it would be impractical and discriminatory to have it any other way. In any case students often have part-time jobs as well.
 

Belzok

Well-known Member
Because it would be impractical and discriminatory to have it any other way. In any case students often have part-time jobs as well.
No it wouldn't, we have nice records of those who work.

Its no more discriminatory than saying you have to be a certain age.

Having to earn the right to vote might bring more engagement.
 

Crossbencher

Suspended
There needs to be some recognition of the practicalities of very large constituencies. My constituency is about 12,000 km2 while Islington North is 7.35km2. One takes at least 5 hours driving to cross on a good day without any tourists, the other can be walked across in under an hour.
My MP lives about 500 yards away but I still never see her.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Samsung HW-Q950A Soundbar Review coming soon to AVForums.com
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Latest News

Campfire Audio launches new Satsuma and Honeydew earphones
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Amazon Prime Day 2021: 21st-22nd June
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Naim debuts Solstice turntable in special edition package
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Harman Luxury Audio Group releases updated MusicLife app
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Q Acoustics announces Q Active app availability
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom