• New Patreon Tier and Early Access Content available. If you would like to support AVForums, we now have a new Patreon Tier which gives you access to selected news, reviews and articles before they are available to the public. Read more.

Boost your Network speed by 20%

Seems safe enough, but don't blame me for any problems...

1. Go to Start-> Run-> and type gpedit.msc
2. Expand the Administrative Templates branch
3. Expand the Network tab
4. Highlight QoS Packet Scheduler
5. Click on Limit Reservable Bandwidth and check the enabled box
6. Then Change the Bandwidth limit % to 0%
7. Reboot your workstation

Worked for me, and many other people.. no problems. The ads on here no longer stall my computer.
 

rickinyorkshire

Distinguished Member
Windows cannot find gpedit.msc.
 

mjn

Distinguished Member

t72bogie

Well-known Member
most people will never tell anyway, if it releases 200Mbps from a 1000Mbps ethernet connection as for 99% of home users the bottleneck is the hard drive, NOT the network

you would need a RAID array with multiple drives to start to max out 1000Mbps ethernet

...still if it makes you feel better ;)
 

ldoodle

Distinguished Member
gpedit.msc is only available in non-home variants of all Windows OS's (Pro, Business, Ultimate etc).
 

Marvin the Android

Well-known Member
gpedit is the local msc editor for group policy. Group policy is usually pushed out to a computer or user - usually at domain login. As such it should only be available on systems capable of joining a domain.

As has been said this tweak is a complete myth and dates back to a similar QoS service on XP. Contrary to popular misconception the bandwidth is not stolen or blocked from use and is free for use by the system. Depending upon what you are doing altering this setting may actually decrease performance. If left alone it may not improve things but it certainly should not make things worse.

As for the bottleneck comment. There is a big difference between Mb and MB in addition to the efficiency of the protocols involved and the overheads of the system bus including caches and buffers. In raw STR a single disk is not necessarily the bottleneck.

Cheers,

Tony.
 

avinitski

Well-known Member
if anyone enjoys a smooth online streaming expereince or uses VOIP applications i would do some research before applying this "tweak".
 

Iccz

Distinguished Member
if anyone enjoys a smooth online streaming expereince or uses VOIP applications i would do some research before applying this "tweak".

I think anyone considering using any kind of "tweak" whereby they are editing something to which they do not know what it does should do research, to blindly edit settings within Windows without knowing directly what they do seems like a crazy thing for someone to do.
It would be like telling someone to open the bonnet of their car and "tweak" certain things there to make their car faster. It's not a good idea unless you know what it's going to fully do.
 

t72bogie

Well-known Member
As for the bottleneck comment. There is a big difference between Mb and MB in addition to the efficiency of the protocols involved and the overheads of the system bus including caches and buffers. In raw STR a single disk is not necessarily the bottleneck.

Cheers,

Tony.

so you saying that the average single consumer mechanical hard drive can max out 1 gig ethernet with traffic?

I have yet to see it personally .....

so for most consumers at home, when they copy n paste in Windows from one PC to another, across a 1 gig network, the hard disk IS the bottleneck surely ?
 

eric pisch

Distinguished Member
so you saying that the average single consumer mechanical hard drive can max out 1 gig ethernet with traffic?

I have yet to see it personally .....

so for most consumers at home, when they copy n paste in Windows from one PC to another, across a 1 gig network, the hard disk IS the bottleneck surely ?

most drives are measured in mega bytes where as lan speed is mega bits

my c drive on this pc measured at 250MB/sec so more than ample to overload a 1gig cable

reads pretty quick as well

Read file: C:\Users\systemadmin\Documents\-\2003.ISO
Size: 597000192 bytes
Time: 406 ms
Transfer Rate: 1402.325 MB/s
 
Last edited:
A lot of you guys use Vista then? Funny, but I thought that nobody uses Vista. Anyway, the site where I got it from said that it works, but may be grabbing some speed from your streaming. For me that is OK. But most people on the other site use XP.
 
I think anyone considering using any kind of "tweak" whereby they are editing something to which they do not know what it does should do research, to blindly edit settings within Windows without knowing directly what they do seems like a crazy thing for someone to do.
It would be like telling someone to open the bonnet of their car and "tweak" certain things there to make their car faster. It's not a good idea unless you know what it's going to fully do.

It's exactly that I don't understand it, but I got it from a programming site where people know this sort of stuff.
 

eric pisch

Distinguished Member
A lot of you guys use Vista then? Funny, but I thought that nobody uses Vista. Anyway, the site where I got it from said that it works, but may be grabbing some speed from your streaming. For me that is OK. But most people on the other site use XP.

tbh i have always removed QoS
 

Iccz

Distinguished Member
It's exactly that I don't understand it, but I got it from a programming site where people know this sort of stuff.

If a software developer, would you change windows settings if I told you it made your computer 20% faster?
I would like to believe before doing certain things and opening certain files people checked the validity of them and what they were actually doing. You have to remember some expert programmers may be hackers, and certain information provided like this may be used to exploit your computer's security if you do not know what you are doing.
Obviously it's unlikely, but it's certainly worth checking the finer details before doing something.
 
If a software developer, would you change windows settings if I told you it made your computer 20% faster?
I would like to believe before doing certain things and opening certain files people checked the validity of them and what they were actually doing. You have to remember some expert programmers may be hackers, and certain information provided like this may be used to exploit your computer's security if you do not know what you are doing.
Obviously it's unlikely, but it's certainly worth checking the finer details before doing something.

I know them, they are game designers. They did a speed check, and got 20% speedup, and so did I. Then they worked out that it came from streaming. I'm not bothered about that.
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
I know them, they are game designers. They did a speed check, and got 20% speedup, and so did I. Then they worked out that it came from streaming. I'm not bothered about that.
They can do all the speed checks they like. Fact of the matter is, it doesn't affect anything that you use day to day.

And to be honest, this myth has been around since the days of XP tweaking, and it's been debunked several times by high profile bloggers and several MSDN blogs.

Applying this "tweak" has the exact same result as rubbing a wet fish over your keyboard - nothing! :D
 
Last edited:

ldoodle

Distinguished Member
most drives are measured in mega bytes where as lan speed is mega bits
It's always a tough one explaining to someone why they're 2MB file takes longer than a couple of seconds to copy over a 2Mb SDSL link! :thumbsdow
 

The latest video from AVForums

Guardians of the Galaxy Xmas Special, Strange World, Bones and All, and Cabinet of Dr Caligari in 4K
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom