blue filter?

Arcam_boy

Distinguished Member
Hi,

Going on holiday soon to Cape Verde :smashin: I'm thinking of adding a blue filter to make the sky/sea look a deeper blue. Is adding a blue filter the right way to go about it?

If so where can I get such a thing? My cameras a Canon 400D with standard 18 - 55mm lens

Thanks :)
 

condyk

Novice Member
The ideal is a ND grad set with filter holder, such as the Lee kit, but this is very pricey and overkill for the gear you have. A CP filter can also do a decent job. Check out hvstar.com as their prices are usually way less than UK. A Kenko pro 1 CP would be best bang for your buck as it's actually the same as the more pricey Hoya Pro 1 CP. If you get a cheap filter then matching with the kit lens is likely to produce a mediocre result. A good CP will last a long time. The issue with the use of a blue filter is that the problem is one of exposure rather than colour.
 

Arcam_boy

Distinguished Member
thanks for the replies will have a look now as you can probably tell I've not got a clue about photography although I'd love to learn :rolleyes:
 

ryart

Active Member
One thing you might want to think about is that the front of the kit lens rotates as it focusses, which can make the use of a polarizing filter tricky.

I suppose the question is do you really need to make the sea bluer?

A polarizing filter can make the sea look a deeper colour, but in doing so you lose the surface quality of the water that can make it look false and rather like a garish picture postcard. Nothing wrong with that if that is the effect you're after but if using for the first time it might be wise to also take some pictures without the filter in case it doesn't seem such a good idea when you get home.

Using a blue filter won't help as it will shift the colour balance for all colours.

Sometimes it is best to use post-processing to slightly darken and increase the saturation of just the blues and greens or specific areas of the picture.

Cheers, Malcolm
 

ryart

Active Member
The ideal is a ND grad set with filter holder, such as the Lee kit, but this is very pricey and overkill for the gear you have.
Just out of interest, why is it overkill for a 400D?

ND grads can give good results in the right hands, but so often people end up with a picture that simply looks false. They were handy for shooting transparencies where there was no (easy) scope for after the event tinkering, but with a dSLR and shooting RAW they aren't so necessary, unless a strong effect is required.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Philips OLED+935 impressions, Denon AVC110 Review, Film Reviews, News and More...
Top Bottom