blu-ray to hard drive playback- one for the pros

lbstyling

Active Member
Hi all,

Ive been running xbmc and boxee for the last week to my main tv from a make-shift htpc and im mighty impressed.

So ive decided (assuming it can be done) to start ripping my blurays to hdd to go on the system.

With the aim in mind of getting TRUE LOSSLESS AUDIO AND VIDEO copys from my blurays to hard drive (as copying to BD-R media is far too expensive)
can this be done? Im aware that getting a player (boxee box/review etc) to output the full audio bandwidth without downsampling is difficult.

so the bottom line is-
1- how do I rip bd's losslessly, keeping the audio quality? can MKV do this?

2- What form of player will I need to play this back keeping the audio and video quality?

I saw a samsung BD player on friday playing mkvs off a usb hard drive ......go on...make my day, say yes!:D
 

next010

Distinguished Member
1) Easy way is use MakeMKV.

2) The Boxee Box has bitstreaming support for TrueHD/DTS-MA unless there's something else I'm not aware of, I confess I'm not an audiophile. However TrueHD bitstreaming is broken in current firmware, it is output as LPCM instead but thats a software issue not hardware.

Also the Boxee Box software is not the same as the PC variant, I'm sure you've seen the pics but it does a good enough job and is a more easy to use player than anything else on the market, but it does not do Blu-ray menus.

If looking outside of XBMC/Boxee you might want to take a look at the Dune series of media players, has Blu-ray menu & HD audio support.
 

lbstyling

Active Member
Thanks next.

Ill look into the dune option now. - I do know that its suppost to be a little bit of a secret that it breaks the hdcp lock somehow- dont know how true this is.

Ive been told that the boxee is actually upsampling the information to 1080p and not natively decoding it.

Ive also been told that the requirements to decode and playback 1080p from a compressed format file of approx 5gb per 2 hour film(Im assuming packeted in mkv) requires fairly massive processing capabilities approx 10x faster than native decoded h264 (bluray native format) so companies like boxee are scaling down divxhd and alike to lossy formats and upscaling to 1080p before output so they arnt found out.

as well as this there are different standards of H264 which complicates things further.

This may mean that if I rip to h264 and avoid any copression that I could get true 1080p lossless through a device such as the boxee- however this will take up 50gb with menus + extras and prob 40gb without.

On the audio side, the boxee cant do dtsma via its optical as the bandwith is too high for optical/spdif, however I dont know if it puts audio out via its hdmi, and have seen no reference to dtsMA and similar on the boxee site other than it takes the 'core' track (just high bitrate dts for instance)

Ill get there eventually!
 

next010

Distinguished Member
I dont know here you got that information from but it is very wrong.

The Boxee Box uses an Intel CE4100 chip and can handle High Profile H.264 up to 80Mbps, the Blu-ray spec only goes as high as 48Mbps. For HD audio you would need to use the HDMI output with a HDMI passthru AMP that is capable of decoding TrueHD or DTS-MA. DTS-MA is supported for bitstreaming.

The media player will play the Blu-ray original video as do most other network media players on the market, HD audio support though tends to vary greatly.

A tool like MakeMKV simply takes the original video and audio then places it in an mkv container, there is no conversion. When converting video into something like x264 using a program like Handbrake the bit-rate & file size is lowered.
 
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lbstyling

Active Member
I dont know here you got that information from but it is very wrong.

The Boxee Box uses an Intel CE4100 chip and can handle High Profile H.264 up to 80Mbps, the Blu-ray spec only goes as high as 48Mbps. For HD audio you would need to use the HDMI output with a HDMI passthru AMP that is capable of decoding TrueHD or DTS-MA. DTS-MA is supported for bitstreaming.

The media player will play the Blu-ray original video as do most other network media players on the market, HD audio support though tends to vary greatly.

A tool like MakeMKV simply takes the original video and audio then places it in an mkv container, there is no conversion. When converting video into something like x264 using a program like Handbrake the bit-rate & file size is lowered.
Right.
I think ive got the answers im looking for:smashin:
I need to keep the file in m2ts format to keep it lossless. any involvment of reducing the files sise (apart from just stripping out info I dont need (like foreign subtitles etc) any other size reduction is lossy as m2ts is already coded/losslessly compressed.

The boxee box does indeed pass through all hd audio formats but doe not internaly decode them. I was confused over this as boxees own audio codec list doesnt mention it.

The comment about the processing power needed for mkv is correct for coding it- not playback. It can take 12hours or more to incode native bluray (m2ts) into a typical mkv (h264 i presume) with lossless audio.

It seams that anydvdHD is the program I need to do what I want.:smashin:
 

next010

Distinguished Member
The comment about the processing power needed for mkv is correct for coding it- not playback. It can take 12hours or more to incode native bluray (m2ts) into a typical mkv (h264 i presume) with lossless audio.

It seams that anydvdHD is the program I need to do what I want.:smashin:
Thats only if your compressing video with x264 as the time taken depends on how fast your CPU is and how many cores it has for instance a 24 core Xeon processor can do a Blu-ray in about 1 hour.

You dont need to stick to m2ts just use MakeMKV, the MKV container is a universal container it can hold any type of video or audio, the video formats are untouched by MakeMKV it simply copies them into an MKV container no different from the original disc. Dont want to use MakeMKV, there are free tools that will give the same end result.

There are also tools out there similar to MakeMKV for m2ts like ClownBD if for some reason you need m2ts.

Or simply rip to .iso image of the disc and play that instead, if you get a Dune player it even gives you the Blu-ray menus exactly the same as the original disc.
 
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