Blown fuse T1A ok to replace with T1AL?

tiffin4tea

Standard Member
I blew the fuse on the power controller of an early 90's technics amp
Its a T1A fuse.

As Maplins is closed I pulled a T1AL fuse from a dvd player. Physically its a bit smaller but are they equivalent and will it be ok to use it?
 

Bobdk

Active Member
These are time delay and time lag fuses, T1A being time delay and T1L a time lag. Obviously they are both 1Amp. You should replace like with like but I don't think there will be an enormous difference between the two. What is more important is the physical size, if you put too small a fuse in it will make poor contact and could cause other problems. If it is not the same physical size I personally would not fit it. Try to buy the correct size and rating, they are not expensve.
 

tiffin4tea

Standard Member
The T1AL is 1mm shorter and the same width. The connection looks forgiving enough to give a good contact.
Would it be ok to use just to test if the amp still switches on? Id like to know if I've fried it before I'll have chance to replace like with like.

Also what is the difference between a time delay and a time lag fuse?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Also what is the difference between a time delay and a time lag fuse?
A time lag, or time delay fuse delays tripping of the fuse for a number of seconds to allow the high amps start up so the fuse will not trip or blow.

Usage depends upon the circuit in which the fuse is being used and whether a high or low inrush current is present. For example, the application difference between a quick-acting and a time-lag fuse is that the former is typically used in circuits exhibiting little or no inrush current or in which high overcurrents or short-circuit currents must be quickly interrupted, whereas a time-lag fuse is used in applications characterized by high starting currents.

The difference between Time Delay and Lag is in the time it takes them to blow.
 
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tiffin4tea

Standard Member
Quick wiki reveals
"LBC fuses on the other hand are designed for situations where the maximum fault current is likely to be less than 10 times the rated fuse current. They typically have a glass body in which the fuse wire can clearly be seen, making it very easy to see if the fuse has blown. LBC fuses are designated "L"."


The fuse im replacing is about 18 years old. Both are glass fuses with virtually identical size.
Possibly the nomenclature has changed but the fuse is the same?

edit: the original fuse has coloured banding thick blue line, red line, black line, red line.

Replacement is clear. Haven't seen a reference to this colour banding is it no longer used?
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
Quick wiki reveals
"LBC fuses on the other hand are designed for situations where the maximum fault current is likely to be less than 10 times the rated fuse current. They typically have a glass body in which the fuse wire can clearly be seen, making it very easy to see if the fuse has blown. LBC fuses are designated "L"."


The fuse im replacing is about 18 years old. Both are glass fuses with virtually identical size.
Possibly the nomenclature has changed but the fuse is the same?

edit: the original fuse has coloured banding thick blue line, red line, black line, red line.

Replacement is clear. Haven't seen a reference to this colour banding is it no longer used?

The appearance isn't important as long as the replacement fuse is rated the same as the blown fuse.

Strange how it blew in the first place,. The build up of current must have occurred for a prolonged period?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Given the nature of this fuse and the fact that it blew, I'd be rather wary of using anything but the correct replacement for it.
 

tiffin4tea

Standard Member
well hmm my own fault. I ran some much larger hifi speakers than its probably meant to run and poof..

I just tried the T1AL even though I shouldn't have and it smoked it in 2 seconds.

Amp fried or try again with the right fuse?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
well hmm my own fault. I ran some much larger hifi speakers than its probably meant to run and poof..

I just tried the T1AL even though I shouldn't have and it smoked it in 2 seconds.

Amp fried or try again with the right fuse?
Try the correct fuse. You've nothing to lose apart from you life, home and possessions :D

I hope you stopped using the larger speakers?
 

tiffin4tea

Standard Member
Yes of course i stopped using them :D
If only I had more patience.
Maplins only sell them 10 at a time but at this rate I may need all of them.
Will update tomorrow if I don't burn the house down...
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Yes of course i stopped using them :D
If only I had more patience.
Maplins only sell them 10 at a time but at this rate I may need all of them.
Will update tomorrow if I don't burn the house down...
I'll keep an eye on the news for reports of fires :D


Good luck ;)
 

tiffin4tea

Standard Member
Just blew 2 of the correct fuses in a row.
Can I assume something was seriously damaged and would prob be an expensive repair?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Just blew 2 of the correct fuses in a row.
Can I assume something was seriously damaged and would prob be an expensive repair?
Given the age of your amp, I'd say your assumption is correct and it would probably cost you more than you'd want to pay just to find the fault.
 
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tiffin4tea

Standard Member
Can't see anything that looks burnt inside other than this foam. (mostly on the right)
It has dust on it though so im not sure its new?

Not familiar with amp internals but if you are then can you tell what this part is likley to be and if its still easy to replace given the age of the amp?





edit:
This is a bi-amp su-ch9. I think the thing (LA4282) with the thermal paste that has gone bubbly is an amp outputting 10W to the tweeters. Only I hooked it up to non-biamp speakers and burnt it out driving them?

Sound liklely?

Anyone know a good hifi repair forum?
 
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dante01

Distinguished Member
This is a bi-amp su-ch9. I think the thing (LA4282) with the thermal paste that has gone bubbly is an amp outputting 10W to the tweeters. Only I hooked it up to non-biamp speakers and burnt it out driving them?

Sound liklely?

Anyone know a good hifi repair forum?
This sounds very likely, but I've no idea of how much it would cost to rectify.
 

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