BKXLS200 power/mains question

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by belgrade, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. belgrade

    belgrade
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    Hi all,

    I was moving some kit around yesterday, and sorting out mains cables. I reorganised my cabling, so that a twin mains socket on one of the side walls had the following connected:

    Mains Socket 1: AV amp, via 5m extension socket
    Mians Socket 2: Double socket which connects BK XLS200, and the base unit of my dect phone.

    The sub and phone are always switched on at the mains in socket 2, but when I switch on the plug in socket 1, I hear an audible noise from the subwoofer. If I then switch socket 1 off, and then on again quickly, it does not make the noise. But if i wait and then switch socket1 on, it makes the noise again.
    It is quite an audible sound coming from the sub, and this did not happen before when my amp was switched in a different socket.

    Is this a problem, or should I not be concerned?
    Is it generally ok to have an amp and sub connected to the same mains socket/s? or should I move the amp to a different socket?

    Any help appreciated :lease:
     
  2. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    Are any of the sockets spurred from another?

    Are you talking about a double mains plug on the wall or 2 sockets in different locations?
     
  3. belgrade

    belgrade
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    Eviljohn,

    Yes, it is a double mains plug on the wall - the sub takes one of the plug (together with a dect phone, via double adaptor), and the other plug is for the amp.

    To my knowledge the mains plug is not spurred from another.
     
  4. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    In that case it's fairly normal. Just a current surge being drawn along the line as a load is applied/removed to the socket.

    You could reduce it by putting a decent anti-surge socket inline with the sub and/or the amp. :)
     
  5. belgrade

    belgrade
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    :thumbsup: Thanks John ,

    So this is fairly normal then. I take it the sub is in no danger then.
    You mention an anti surge socket. The sub and diital telephone are connected to one socket , by a double mains adaptor. What if I replace this double adaptor with a surge-protected double adaptor. I take it this will suffice.

    John, is it ok to have a telephone and sub connected to one socket in this way. I'm assuming the telephone is drawing little current.

    Finally John, is it generally ok to connect a sub, and amp to one double mains plug, or is this usually frowned upon?

    Thanks again :smashin:
     
  6. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    It should be just fine, I've got my entire hifi and my computer (TV, aerial, BFD, receiver, freeview, DVD, Gamecube, mini system, computer, laser printer, 2 subs and a lamp) coming from one double socket with no trouble.

    If you're using extension sockets it's good practice to put the high drain items (such as amplifiers, subs and TVs) closest to the actual wall socket but otherwise there's not much more you can do.

    A surge protected double socket would probably help although you really need to start spending a fair amount to get a huge difference. Build quality is often quite important here, I use a 7-socket Belkin surgemaster off one of the sockets which cost me about £30 from Amazon and is excellent. Have a look at some of the computer anti-surge power sockets and pick one that looks well made, it can be good practice to have some degree of surge protection anyway. :)
     
  7. belgrade

    belgrade
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    Thanks again John,

    You've put my mind at ease. :thumbsup:

    :eek: Blimey, you really have got loads connected to that double socket. Makes me wonder why I was worrying so much.

    Cheers
     
  8. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    :laugh:
    Not to worry, it's easy enough to work out how much you can plug into each socket. I wouldn't want to draw more than 9Amps from each outlet in total and each item must display it's power usage on the back by the power inlet (shown in Watts).

    Total Power = Total Current Drawn * 280V

    So just add up all of the power ratings on your appliances, divide that sum by 280 and you've got the amount of current being drawn.

    This is only a rough guideline but you only really start having trouble if you're plugging white goods, toasters, kettles, irons and so on into the same socket. Basically anything that gets very hot. :)
     

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