Bizarre issue with Onkyo A9110 integrated amplifier. Help!

simonh629

Member
I recently purchased a second hand (barely used) Onkyo A9110 to use with a HiFi setup alongside Q Acoustics 3030i speakers.

There is a weird problem whereby no sound comes out of the speakers until the volume knob reaches about 50%, at which point they come on very loudly and are incredibly sensitive to tiny changes on the volume knob, cutting out completely if it turns a bit lower.

I took the lid off the amp to have a nose around and everything looked in good order from my untrained eye.

Any ideas what could be happening?! Speakers work fine with my friend's A9010 set up the same way.
 

larkone

Distinguished Member
Faulty volume pot - be careful because you could destroy your speakers.
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
Seller would've been aware and didn't say anything. Think you should see if they'll cover the repair costs.
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
I recently purchased a second hand (barely used) Onkyo A9110 to use with a HiFi setup alongside Q Acoustics 3030i speakers.

There is a weird problem whereby no sound comes out of the speakers until the volume knob reaches about 50%, at which point they come on very loudly and are incredibly sensitive to tiny changes on the volume knob, cutting out completely if it turns a bit lower.

I took the lid off the amp to have a nose around and everything looked in good order from my untrained eye.

Any ideas what could be happening?! Speakers work fine with my friend's A9010 set up the same way.
The volume control should not work like that. Usually if it is very old an amplifier then you can get crackling sound from the speakers. Then you can try and use some electronic spray and see if it gets better. Or the wiper inside the volume control has a lose connection.
After googling online it appears its a very new amplifier, and therefore I recommend returning it to the store. Good luck.
 

Kapkirk

Active Member
I recently purchased a second hand (barely used) Onkyo A9110 to use with a HiFi setup alongside Q Acoustics 3030i speakers.

There is a weird problem whereby no sound comes out of the speakers until the volume knob reaches about 50%, at which point they come on very loudly and are incredibly sensitive to tiny changes on the volume knob, cutting out completely if it turns a bit lower.

I took the lid off the amp to have a nose around and everything looked in good order from my untrained eye.

Any ideas what could be happening?! Speakers work fine with my friend's A9010 set up the same way.
Could also be speaker protection relay if fitted. contacts need cleaning.
 

Daniel 70

Active Member
The volume control should not work like that. Usually if it is very old an amplifier then you can get crackling sound from the speakers. Then you can try and use some electronic spray and see if it gets better. Or the wiper inside the volume control has a lose connection.
After googling online it appears its a very new amplifier, and therefore I recommend returning it to the store. Good luck.
I have looked at the circuit diagram , and it doesn't have a volume pot in the traditional sense. .. it has a single channel DC voltage pot, which sends a DC voltage back to the main audio processing chip , which then alters the level at which the audio is sent to the two amplifiers. It is mounted in an assy. With a motor for remote control, or it can be manually rotated
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
I have looked at the circuit diagram , and it doesn't have a volume pot in the traditional sense. .. it has a single channel DC voltage pot, which sends a DC voltage back to the main audio processing chip , which then alters the level at which the audio is sent to the two amplifiers. It is mounted in an assy. With a motor for remote control, or it can be manually rotated
From what I learned the volume knob acts like a pot meter, while the wiper lets you adjust the sound up and down. Send the unit back or buy a new. Perhaps it is a lemon you have. Is the volume control digital or analog? Perhaps some electro spray can help...
 

Daniel 70

Active Member
From what I learned the volume knob acts like a pot meter, while the wiper lets you adjust the sound up and down. Send the unit back or buy a new. Perhaps it is a lemon you have. Is the volume control digital or analog? Perhaps some electro spray can help...
The volume control knob is a single resistance element.. but whether it is a voltage or ..and very plausible ,part of a frequency timing circuit ,used in PWM is not at all clear ... It feeds into the big audio processor chip.
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
@Daniel 70,
If you can’t fix it your self (I bet you can when you find out exactly what the problem is), then send it on service. Probably we’ll cost around 100 GBP. I am reading the review about the Onkyo amp right now. Even if it only has 50 watts,I still bet it rocks.
Still watts mean nothing in the grand scheme.

Speaker sensitivity/resistance, the amplifier current, voltage is more important. I sincerely hope you get the amplifier fixed soon. Life without music is hassle.

I can’t seem to remember if you bought it new, if so it should be covered by warranty. If you did not buy it new at the shop, then complain to the seller. You never know the seller may cover the service expensiveness.

Good luck.
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
I'm not taking anything seriously, just trying to avoid confusion for others reading the thread.
 

Kapkirk

Active Member
From what I learned the volume knob acts like a pot meter, while the wiper lets you adjust the sound up and down. Send the unit back or buy a new. Perhaps it is a lemon you have. Is the volume control digital or analog? Perhaps some electro spray can help...
Many modern amps use rotary encoders to change the volume, does away with the old style wiper potentiometers, it's done digitally instead so completely prevents the type of problem the OP has.
I have seen the issue he has on many amplifiers using protection relays, as you increase the input the relay eventually passes current and the sound is heard.
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
Many modern amps use rotary encoders to change the volume, does away with the old style wiper potentiometers, it's done digitally instead so completely prevents the type of problem the OP has.
I have seen the issue he has on many amplifiers using protection relays, as you increase the input the relay eventually passes current and the sound is heard.
Thanks.
 

The latest video from AVForums

AVForums Movies Podcast: Which is the best decade for horror movies?
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom