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Bi_wiring Mission M73 to A+B channels?

Matt

Active Member
I'm in the process of redecorating and hope to get my set-up done correctly (other halves approval etc)

I intend to make up some CAT5e cables as i have a load in the shed but wanted to know what would be the best way to bi-wire.
My Amp is a Yamaha RX-V596-RDS which has an A and B channel. The Missions have two sets of binding posts. Would it best to wire them so that :

A. Each speaker is on a seperate channel eg left on A, right on B

B. Tweeters on A, Bass on B?

C. Doesnt really matter.
 

Knyght_byte

Novice Member
i have a Aiwa amp from about 10 years ago when they made some solid but cheap integrated amps, bit like Yamahas really (but cheaper), i have A+B setup on a pair of Wharfedales, i have A driving tweeters and B driving woofers...

i did it this way on the assumption that you would get better performance if each amp is only having to cope with a single type of driver.......
if you wired both drivers to A for the left speaker, and both drivers to B for the right speaker, then i cant see how that would be much different from just running both speakers from A OR B but biwired at the speakers end.....

or am i wrong and an amp with A+B is simply 4 channels of power that can be used any which way and it not matter? (other than you only have A and B buttons, not A, B, ABleft and ABright buttons...)
 

Knyght_byte

Novice Member
just thought, parents are out tomorrow, those speakers are in the lounge, i can go down and test the theory out....heh......
 
B

Bugblatter

Guest
Most amps with A+B actually only give two channels, they just give you two sets of outputs for them. So it's still bi-wiring rather than bi-amping, no different to wiring the speakers up to the same posts apart from the convenience.
 

Knyght_byte

Novice Member
im pretty sure my Aiwa was 2 separate power amp stages internally.....havnt looked at the manual in about 8 years tho, so i might be wrong....lol

only thing that springs to mind is seeing it quote 40w + 40w per channel.......which was rather conservative given how manufacturers normally like to spout 100's of watts at PMPO...lol......it certainly had some grunt for 40w + 40w per channel tho, managed to drive some Jamo D265's to pointlessly clublike levels once when i borrowed them from a friend for a week...lol
 

Matt

Active Member
I suspect it will not make a lot of difference so will probably just go for single wired bradied Cat5 for the time being.
 

paulst10

Distinguished Member
what u are trying is bi-amping, most recent av amps have this ability, i had a pioneer ax3 that could do this ( if you are not using the surround back channels )

i would check in the menu options for your amp first, just in case
 

pragmatic

Well-known Member
Yamaha amps usualy have a and b for convience, i have mine bi-wired but mainly because I lost the solid metal bar between, the sounbd difference will be pretty identical unless your bi-qwireing using bell wire then you may hear a difference, but only because your increasing the overall thickness of wire between the amp and speakers.
 

MagicBoy

Active Member
I bi-wired my Tannoy floorstanders to my Sony AV amp just to see what it sounded like. (I was bored one lunchtime and Richers was a couple of doors down from the butty shop!).

Cable thickness is pretty much the same - replaced Gale XL315 with XL160 biwire. I have HF on A, LF on B. Can't really notice much difference to be honest. The treble is slightly clearer which helps channel separation. It only cost about £6 in cable so I'm pretty easy with it and I re-used the XL315 as a pocket money upgrade on the centre speaker.
 

Will Scarlet

Well-known Member
In general most A/B outputs are connected to the same output internally, hence when checking speaker termination options on cable sites they normally give a 2 into 4 configuration for bi-wiring. I have my fronts bi-wired to a Denon 2805 through the A/B option however, simply because I had four separate runs of Chord Odyssey 2 rather than two of Odyssey 4 and it was easier. I have my A connected to the tweeters and B woofers. Only for ease of recognition, A= high, B= low. It should not matter.
Regards the benefits. A quick search of the forum will dig up plenty of opinions on this, most say it matters little unless you are bi-amping. For my part I'd say that if it is of little extra cost to you go ahead and bi-wire. It certainly won't have a negative effect on performance.
 

pragmatic

Well-known Member
One small benifit is so you can check if one of the section is broke, i.e. plug tweeter into A and everything else into B (as thats how the internal crossover genernaly work) and then switch one off and on to see if there is a difference. Sometimes if a system seems bass heavy i can be infact be becasue the tweeter(s) have blow or died ect, and as you can't see or feel (don't try touching your tweeter you might push it in) the tweeter actauly move like you can bass drivers, its an easy test that works. Also the tweeters may not be broke but the cross over faulty or the wire connection as well as others probably.
 

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