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bi-wiring with only one speaker terminal?

PSM1

Distinguished Member
The best way to wire them is to use a single pair of decent thickness (2.5mm or greater) oxygen free copper cable from the amp to the speakers. If the speakers have 2 sets of terminals then either leave the jumper bars in place or replace them with a little bit of speaker cable.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Method 2 would be more usual, but it does not make a huger difference. Bi-wiring makes small gains, as you reduce modulation of the HF by large currents in the LF - if you believe the BBC.

Bi-amping has much bigger gains, as this separates the drivers much more effectively.
 

Alan Mac

Well-known Member
Just FYI, both methods you've illustrated for connection in your diagram are electrically identical)



They are not electrically identical, as the inductance and capacitance of and between the conductors is different in the two cases. Not that it’s likely to make any audible difference.


Alan
 

Member 605849

Standard Member
They are not electrically identical, as the inductance and capacitance of and between the conductors is different in the two cases. Not that it’s likely to make any audible difference.


Alan

I'm not sure what you mean exactly Alan? :(

In both examples 2 discrete conductors connect each terminal - the marked colours on the wires being irrelevant. Unless I'm missing something?
 

Alan Mac

Well-known Member
I'm not sure what you mean exactly Alan? :(

In both examples 2 discrete conductors connect each terminal - the marked colours on the wires being irrelevant. Unless I'm missing something?

Gareth,

In the second (lower) wiring example, electric charge flows back and forth from the red amplifier terminal through the red conductor, through one of the loudspeaker drivers and back through the black conductor which is in close proximity to the red conductor. We know these red and black conductors are in close proximity to each other from the “wire” diagram shown.

The closer the red and black conductors are together the lower the series inductance and the higher the parallel capacitance.


In the upper wiring diagram, the red conductor and its associated “return” conductor are spatially separated, increasing the inductance and reducing the capacitance as seen by the amplifier and the loudspeaker drivers.


Alan
 

Member 605849

Standard Member
Gareth,

In the second (lower) wiring example, electric charge flows back and forth from the red amplifier terminal through the red conductor, through one of the loudspeaker drivers and back through the black conductor which is in close proximity to the red conductor. We know these red and black conductors are in close proximity to each other from the “wire” diagram shown.

The closer the red and black conductors are together the lower the series inductance and the higher the parallel capacitance.


In the upper wiring diagram, the red conductor and its associated “return” conductor are spatially separated, increasing the inductance and reducing the capacitance as seen by the amplifier and the loudspeaker drivers.


Alan

Thanks for the explanation Alan :)

Given that both of the wires are also likely to run side by side to the speaker I think I agree with your earlier assessment that the difference would be minimal. :smashin:
 

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