Bi-wire Help

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by Dan Turner, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. Dan Turner

    Dan Turner
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    Hi all,

    I recently purchased a set of Q Acoustics 1050 floor standers and over the weekend wired them up to my AV Receiver, a Yamaha RX-V459. Following some advice I decided that from the off I would bi-wire them but I have a feeling I have either done it wrong or my receiver doesn't properly support it.
    Currently I have 2 wires coming off the L+,L-,R+,R- terminals of "Speaker A" which then go to the relavent connections on the speakers, however during my tests there seemed to be a distinct lack of upper range and everything was quite boomy/bassy.
    Off the back of my own research I think that with this receiver I'm supopsed to use A and B channels rather than running the bi-wire off a single channel but could do with someone confirming this.

    So without getting into the debate of whether I'm wasting my time bi-wiring etc, I could do with some helpful hints to try to rectify the problem or a methodology for troubleshooting this problem.

    Thanks in advance

    Dan
     
  2. dante01

    dante01
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    Bi-wiring is a pointless excercise without also bi-amping. Your receiver doesn't fascilitate bi-amping so I'd suggest you not bother with bi-wiring.

    You cannot bi-amp with your receiver so no need for bi-wiring. For the reasoning behind this see here:
    Bi-amping vs Bi-wiring: What's the Difference and is it Audible? | Audioholics


    All you've done is double the thickness of the wire from your receiver to the speakers which will have no benefit unless you speakers are an inordinately long way from your receiver.
     
  3. Dan Turner

    Dan Turner
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    Thanks dante,

    when I was doing my research and found the info about using the A+B channels they were suggesting that this is a rudimentary form of bi amping, or is that completely off base?
     
  4. dante01

    dante01
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    No, the A and B terminals simply share the same amps onboard the receiver so it is not bi-amping. The speakers would be powered via the same number of amplifiers had you not used the A + B terminals. The only difference is that you've added an extra run of speaker wire for each speaker. Bi-amping requires seperate and individual amplification for both the hi and the lo frequency drive units and not just seperate wires from the same amplification.
     
  5. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    Bi-wire and Bi-amp are two different things!

    Bi-wire is effectively adding a thicker gauge cable to your system and for the most part has very little or any perceivable advantage over a properly specified single run of cable.

    Bi-amp is where separate amplifiers are used to drive the High, Low and even in some systems Mid-range drivers in your speaker cabinet.

    To Bi-amp you need to remove the short links between the +/+ and -/- terminals at the rear of your loudspeakers.

    With your Amp you can set the ‘’B’ Speaker out sockets to ‘Front’ to use those sockets to Bi-amp your Main Zone Front LR speakers – typically you would connect the Main Front LR Outs to the HF terminals on the Front LR Speakers plus connect the B Speaker terminal to the LF terminals on the Front LR speakers with your second set of cables.

    What is not very 'clear' from the Yamaha Manual is if connecting as above and setting the B speakers to 'Front' is delivering a processed or non-processed mirror of the Main Front LR Outs!

    Joe
     
  6. dante01

    dante01
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    The RX-V459 is a 6.1 AV receiver so will not have the required number of onboard amps needed for bi-amping. The manual makes no reference to bi-amping and there's no means by which to fascilitate it with the RXV459. The A/B speaker terminals are there to fascilate A/B speaker switching and both sets of terminals are powered by the one and the same onboard amplifiers. You cannot bi-amp with the RXV459.

    Yamaha receivers that can bi-amp have a very specific setting for this and the RXV459 has no such option.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2014
  7. Dan Turner

    Dan Turner
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    Thanks for your response Joe, I think I understand what you are driving at.
    I also found the Yamaha manual somewhat unhelpful but in an RX-V5XX series manual there was some information on setting up a system like you have described. When I have a bit of time I will have to try it out and see what I can achieve.
    Presumably my fall back plan can always be to link the terminals with some speaker cable (don't have the links) and the sound will be satisfactory until I find some time to properly experiment?

    Cheers

    Dan
     
  8. Dan Turner

    Dan Turner
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    Dante,

    apologies for misleading you. As a bit of a newbie my terminology is probably incorrect in this instance. The uploaded picture of the back of the receiver should hopefully add some clarity to what I was attempting to explain

    Cheers

    Dan
     

    Attached Files:

  9. dante01

    dante01
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    I have the RXV459's manual at my disposal and you cannot bi-amp with it. Besides which, there's not the required number of onboard amplifiers present to fascilitate bi-amping. You'd need at least a 7.1 AV receiver to bi-amp with and your receiver is a 6.1 channel amp. If using the A/B terminals then you are simply splitter the same amps output and sending the power via two runs of wire as opposed to one. There's no advantage to doing this.
     
  10. Dan Turner

    Dan Turner
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    I see, well that is the answer to my question then. At least I know now, although do feel a bit daft for investing in the speakers without the sufficient amp. I guess I know what the future holds.
    Am I right in thinking, though, that disconnecting the second set of wires and bridging the terminals will at least partly remedy the problem?

    Cheers

    Dan
     
  11. dante01

    dante01
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    Most speakers these days include bi-wirable speaker terminals, but this isn't to say that you have to use them. They work without having to do so if you leave the bridging plates in place.
     
  12. Dan Turner

    Dan Turner
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    Jut one last stupid question, for me to do a quick trial i'd like to disconnect a set of wires at the speaker end (as they're more easily accessible) and bridge the terminals. As long as the disconnected ends don't ground on anything or each other is this going to be ok? Or is there a risk to any of the equipment?
     
  13. dante01

    dante01
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    Yes that will be okay. Maybe just wrap a bit of electrical tape over the exsposed copper to ensure the wires do not come into contact with anything.
     

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