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Question Better Sound Quality

sep8001

Well-known Member

dogfonos

Well-known Member
I'm torn on this one. My inclination is also to recommend an active speaker setup as suggested by the previous two posters - they are good suggestions - but...

You already own what appears to be a reasonable amplifier in the form of the Sony receiver. Sony generally don't make bad amps or receivers though I know nothing about this particular model other than specs I've seen - and the specs show it's a solid 100W RMS amp when used in stereo. Assuming it's working properly and showing no sign of any problems then I'd be tempted to keep it and, though it hurts me to say, put the £150 budget towards a pre-owned pair of passive speakers.

IMO, best performance for you £150 speaker budget will be to find a good second-hand bargain. Typically, £150 should get you a 2 to 4 year old pair in perfect condition that probably sold for over double that when new. Choose carefully and you should end up with a very nice pair of passive speakers.

If however you wish to buy new speakers then the choice between a cheap £150 pair of active speakers vs. £150 pair of passives (driven by your Sony receiver) gets too close for me to call in terms of what will likely give you the best audio quality.

Oh dear, I shall probably be seen as Judus Iscariot by the active mafia (ha, ha).
 

sep8001

Well-known Member
I'm torn on this one. My inclination is also to recommend an active speaker setup as suggested by the previous two posters - they are good suggestions - but...

You already own what appears to be a reasonable amplifier in the form of the Sony receiver. Sony generally don't make bad amps or receivers though I know nothing about this particular model other than specs I've seen - and the specs show it's a solid 100W RMS amp when used in stereo. Assuming it's working properly and showing no sign of any problems then I'd be tempted to keep it and, though it hurts me to say, put the £150 budget towards a pre-owned pair of passive speakers.

IMO, best performance for you £150 speaker budget will be to find a good second-hand bargain. Typically, £150 should get you a 2 to 4 year old pair in perfect condition that probably sold for over double that when new. Choose carefully and you should end up with a very nice pair of passive speakers.

If however you wish to buy new speakers then the choice between a cheap £150 pair of active speakers vs. £150 pair of passives (driven by your Sony receiver) gets too close for me to call in terms of what will likely give you the best audio quality.

Oh dear, I shall probably be seen as Judus Iscariot by the active mafia (ha, ha).

Thank you for the above, I presume using the amp I could also add a sub at a later date.

Any suggestion of good passive speakers to look for?

Thank you
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
The best pre-owned passive speaker for you depends on a few factors such as: the size of your listening room, musical tastes, typical listening volume, speaker placement within room.

For instance, I'd suggest a refined bookshelf model if you enjoyed lightweight music in a small room but it wouldn't suit Drum&Bass in an aircraft hanger. With a few exceptions, a small speaker in a large room will sound gutless whereas a large speaker in a small room will likely swamp the room with excessive bass (again, there are exceptions). Also of course, we all have personal preferences when it comes to sonic characteristics.

Choose suitably sized models from reputable manufacturers such as Acoustic Energy, Q-Acoustics, Tannoy, Focal/J M Lab, Bowers & Wilkins, Monitor Audio, Mission, Wharfedale and KEF. I can't recommend specific models as I don't know what's on the second-hand market at any given time. And I have little current knowledge of passive speakers.

Check out online reviews for speakers that come onto the market and follow-up promising leads and maybe post back here to get the views of others on specific models. Best to listen to any speaker prior to purchase, especially when buying second-hand (sometimes, easier said than done). Good luck.
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
I presume using the amp I could also add a sub at a later date.

If the receiver has a subwoofer output then yes, you should be able to connect a subwoofer. Even if it doesn't have a suitable output, there are ways of connecting a powered subwoofer.
 

HiFiRuss71

Distinguished Member
To be honest, you'll find little to touch a pair of active/powered nearfield monitors for PC sound. Bear in mind that normal hifi speakers aren't balanced to either be listened to from 2-3ft (too much treble) or to be sat on/near a desktop (too much bass).

Have look at something like the Mackie MR524 (£225/pair). i know I just blew your budget, but they're a great little speaker. Other brands are also available!

Russ
 

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