Question Best set-up for HD live streaming

medea34788

Novice Member
My org is looking to buy a new set-up for live streaming lectures. We're looking for a camera/camcorder and associated software for live streaming.

We have a tripod and audio system in the room, so we don't need an amazing built-in mic, but we do need to be able to feed in sound from our sound system into the camera and we need HD quality video (4k would be nice to record with, but not necessary). Our lecturers often use screens or projectors as well, so a camera that might have features to help adjust for bad lighting would help.

We had previously used an old Canon DV camcorder hooked up via firewire to a computer running Adobe Flash Encoder on WinXP to live stream to UStream but the camcorder broke and we need to upgrade our system desperately because nothing we use is supported any more.

In the end we want a camera that we can mount on our tripod, plug into a new computer and run software to live stream to YouTube and/or Facebook, as well as record the lecture for us to upload to our channel afterwards (we have access to Adobe AfterEffects to do editing if needed, so we don't need an editor necessarily).

I'd appreciate any suggestions for a good camera/camcorder and recommendations for a good program to use to live stream. Thanks!
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
I remember that there have been a number of posts asking very similar questions - it may be worth searching for them.
The trick is finding a camera that will give you a live output while recording, some cut off the live feed when in record mode.
I speak purely for Panasonic. My HC-V800 has a live HDMI feed while recording. The earlier HC-V750 also had a live A/V output (the later cameras have lost the A/V output) and I think the HC-V770 is the same.
The problem may be getting the HDMI signal into your PC. The HDMI on a PC is normally an output only. There are plenty of USB to HDMI adapters but few HDMI to USB so you may need to search.
Hope this helps.

PS An option is to use a Webcam which feeds directly into USB

PPS There is a bit of kit called a Elgato CamLink that looks like a HDMI to USB adapter.
 
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Deleted member 765458

Guest
My org is looking to buy a new set-up for live streaming lectures. We're looking for a camera/camcorder and associated software for live streaming.

We have a tripod and audio system in the room, so we don't need an amazing built-in mic, but we do need to be able to feed in sound from our sound system into the camera and we need HD quality video (4k would be nice to record with, but not necessary). Our lecturers often use screens or projectors as well, so a camera that might have features to help adjust for bad lighting would help.

We had previously used an old Canon DV camcorder hooked up via firewire to a computer running Adobe Flash Encoder on WinXP to live stream to UStream but the camcorder broke and we need to upgrade our system desperately because nothing we use is supported any more.

In the end we want a camera that we can mount on our tripod, plug into a new computer and run software to live stream to YouTube and/or Facebook, as well as record the lecture for us to upload to our channel afterwards (we have access to Adobe AfterEffects to do editing if needed, so we don't need an editor necessarily).

I'd appreciate any suggestions for a good camera/camcorder and recommendations for a good program to use to live stream. Thanks!

There are many interesting vides on on this topic, on video sharing sites around then internet. But be warned some people try to be brand influencers, hoping to get free goodies by always mentioning a brand for every problem they talk about their x brand product has amazing option for your problem. They always promote buying new equipment, rather than solving the task with what equipment you have access to.

So look around at plenty of solutions with many different brands and peoples opinions


Some ideas




And a Mac solution


As time spent looking around is worth it.

Watch out for brand promoters, influnecers hoping for free brand gear.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
The point is clearly made on the above videos:-
1) You need a camcorder that will still give an HDMI output while recording.
2) You need a converter to turn HDMI to USB.

It is a pity that the Elgato Camlink is a bit expensive but it will do the job.

I used to use A/V to run a monitor but, like FireWire, it seems to be left off the newer cams. HDMI has replaced it as most TVs have an HDMI input for viewing directly from the camera.
 

medea34788

Novice Member
Thank you for the advice!

I've done a lot of digging around the internet, but a lot of the solutions don't directly reference my biggest problems, which is that Firewire isn't a thing anymore it seems, and that's the only way to hook up a computer and camcorder without extra equipment. Or they don't deal with my problem of inputing a video feed from a camera alongside an audio feed from a separate mixer (or I'm an idiot and not recognizing the terminology - I'm new to video).

A product like the Slingbox or Elgato CamLink might be our best solution it seems. Slingbox looks more comprehensive as the video mentions that it will do a separate audio mixer input, but it also seems to be Mac only right now, which significantly increases our price (macs are so expensive). I've seen some people state that the Elgato doesn't have a good quality though because USB just isn't good enough for video streaming, but it might be a better option for the moment

I had tried to previously update our laptop (because XP is not a system that we should be using!) but there's no way to input - as Terfyn mentioned, HDMI is output not input.

If I use one of these products though, the camera's features and/or livestreaming capabilities become a little less important right? I don't need a camera that will do both streaming and recording because we can get a secondary device to do that?
We have long lectures (1-2 hours) so a DSLR has too much of a risk of overheating (they're great for short videos, but none I've ever used have done well with more than 20 minutes of continuous filming). Similarly we have been ruling out webcams because they lack optical zoom, which we would need for our larger rooms as digital zoom and low light/back-lit filming looks terrible I think.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
You could put the audio feed through the camera mic socket provided you reduce the level to mic from line. I use a SESCOM in line attenuator to feed line output to my camera.

You can get FireWire cards for laptops but I do admit it is easier with a tower PC. I have a Firewire card fitted to take the signal from my (now retired) Canon HV20.
 

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