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Best sealed subwoofer damping, Dacron or Foam ? To match my proac speakers.

westsounds

Active Member
I am trying to find out what’s the best filler / lining for a seal enclosure subwoofer. I am building a subwoofer my self and I am wondering which would be best to use. I have looked in my stereo speakers as they are one of the best sounding speakers ive ever heard (ProAc tablette reference 8 signatures) and these have foam(sponge) all around apart from front where there is nothing and the rear which has a small amount of fleecy white Dacron. However my speakers are twin ported designs and my sub is sealed. Would it be best to put foam all around?

Ive looked everywhere on line but there are no clear answers. I know it improves the bass but what are the characteristics of each. Any ideas advice would be great thanks.
 

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
The foam inside helps dampen down port resonance and motor noise in a ported sub, in a sealed sub it pretty much does nothing. In both types of sub (well all 3 if you include pr'), normal poly fibre fill is used inside the sub as it has the effect of fooling the driver into sounding like it is in a larger cabinet than it is. In both cases my preference would be to use the fibre fill, and I wouldnt bother with foam lining, at least not is a sealed subwoofer, and only maybe in a ported one.

What are you planing to build?
 

westsounds

Active Member
I am just going to try a simple sealed design. As I dont really want to fork out for something like a Bk xxls400 which is what i would want if i was buying new.

I have been looking around and there are some great bargains about in the used car audio world. Some of the component subwoofers here seem far more advanced than most of the home audio speakers that are available. Even some of the better amps have massive power and all the bass filters etc built into them. Its just the problem of getting the power supply right to use in the home. The finish of the enclosure could hide all this and I'm sure you could put a sub woofer together with some serious slam for a fraction of the cost.

My proac's provide amazing sound and are not lacking in anything but a box of that size is limited, a sub would be great fun in the day time when a bit more volume is called for.
 
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micb3rd

Active Member
Don't waste you time on car amps and big power supplies for in home. Stick to 240 volt equipment in home.

For a sealed sub it is worth using some loose fibre fill.

Ported, I never line the inside. If you realy want to you can, it may only be only worth doing it if you are going to run the subwoofer to higher midbass frequncies.
 

chienmetallique

Well-known Member
You may save yourself £100 going diy compared to a xxls400, I assure you, you'll struggle to match the finish. With those Proacs don't you owe it to yourself to get a near match?
 

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
You may save yourself £100 going diy compared to a xxls400, I assure you, you'll struggle to match the finish. With those Proacs don't you owe it to yourself to get a near match?

Why will it be a struggle to match the finish, a bit of veneer with a clear varnish or lacquer over looks professionally finished. As for beating the price of the xls400, I would think it would be hard to beat it for less money personally, although pre-owned parts will help a lot. Even using the same components basically costs the same if your trying to replicate it, and that assumes you need to buy nothing in the way of tools.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
I think you under estimate your skills if you assume all DIYers could match a professional finish on their first attempt :D
 

chienmetallique

Well-known Member
Why will it be a struggle to match the finish, a bit of veneer with a clear varnish or lacquer over looks professionally finished. As for beating the price of the xls400, I would think it would be hard to beat it for less money personally, although pre-owned parts will help a lot. Even using the same components basically costs the same if your trying to replicate it, and that assumes you need to buy nothing in the way of tools.

Lots of practice creates competence, having the right tools creates confidence. Not everybody has the money to make mistakes and improve upon them. Hence my point. I agree with Irongiant, YOU under estimate your abilities compared to a novice.
 

Member 639844

Former Advertiser
Thats a far comment I guess, although I only consider myself a DIY'er, and compared to the machine finishes a manufacturer produces my efforts ar less than perfect. Thing is, even though a DIY build wont ever be perfect (its not machined by a computer after all), you can get away with certain things that end up hidden away and unseen on the finished product, and that leads to a very good looking product in the end.

There are ways to practise for very little, and believe me, most people on here have more spending power than me at the minute. To practise, you could build a small box from offcuts you can probably get for nothing from a local timber merchants. 10 quid on screws and filler from your local diy store and a tester pot of paint will be all you need to get an idea of what is involved. Veneering can be tackled by ordering a sample from a supplier and seeing how that goes on your test box. Before you know it, you have done a dry run and you should know if you likely to be capable of tackling a DIY build of your own. Failing all that, I'm building cabs for people as I enjoy it (gets me out of the house, and I enjoy working with wood) so there is always an option there if DIY is attractive but you have no tools etc.

Honestly guys, I may underestimate what I can do, but I think you guys think I'm better than I am. I try to document everything I do for others to follow, and as long as you take your time, then a good surprisingly good result is not that far away :D

Never underestimate what your able to achieve, and dont sell yourself short guys :smashin:
 

westsounds

Active Member
Just as a bit of fun I put together this very quick/cheap project as a temporary measure (as I sourced a lots of the parts at a very good price locally). I have used a PC PSU to power a 12" pioneer TS-W305C sub and amp at home. It is a 250 watt RMS amp powered by a Silent 700W 40A @ 12V power supply. It sounds really good, its extremely powerful and can handle high volume with ease. The power supply doesn't even get warm but the amp does when driven very hard, but it is designed like a large heat sink so it's fine.

It is a sealed box and the only other thing I have done to it is put some Dacron fleecy lining inside to dampen it. All the wires were cut down as necessary, and I soldered on larger wires for the power and ground so it looks a lot neater. I may add some good spikes if I can find some to the bottom which may improve the sound further. I know it doesn't have no where near the same finish and build and the looks are open to debate if it was left in full view, but I would love to put it against a home AV bk electronics xls200 or even a xxls400 sub woofer to see how it compares. They can't be that much if any better and this was a fraction of the cost. I would love to hear either but as nobody demos them and they are very hard to get hold of second hand. You have to buy them new on just reviews and other people's opinions only so it's a bit of a risk at that cost if you end up being not that impressed by it overall. Anybody living in Wales with either who fancies a challenge : )

I have owned a Rel Quake and a Paradigm PDR10 and this is more powerful and better in my opinion. Being the way I am I also took both these subwoofers apart to look at there construction and this car sub woofer looks far superior in its construction.
 

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Member 639844

Former Advertiser
I dont think Ive ever seen anyone not be impressed by a BK sub. One person recently replaced his old MK MX5100 with a BK XLS 400 and was still impressed by the BK offering.

You can return them, then they go on e-bay, but there are very very few ever sold on there.
 

westsounds

Active Member
Car amps from my experience go loud with no finesse.

I thought BK allow you to return within 30 days if you are not happy, why not call them to confirm?

Subwoofer finesse is something that I have very little experience with. I can appreciate finesse with speakers which are known for their class leading transparency or smooth clear treble and midrange magic but my experience of bass and subwoofers is its either to much / out of control boomy or tight, deep and good. I have owned few subs and they have all failed to really impress so far. Having a bit of fun with the car sub at the moment but I would really love to try a xls200 and a xxls400. Maybe they would perhaps loan me some and I pay postage?
 
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