Best output from a 360 to 1080p TV

knownoversight

Standard Member
Hi,
I'm brand new to this forum, so please excuse me for any gaffs.
I'm doing some preliminary research in to buying a new HDTV (it'll almost certainly be Full HD), and have realised one of the items that'll be plugging in to my new HDTV will be my Xbox 360.
The way I see it there are five different methods employed by the 360 in sending a video signal out.
Can you have a look at my list and let me know if I have them right?
1. HDMI
2. Composite
3. VGA
4. SCART
5. The one with the yellow lead for video, and red and white for sound.

Got a couple of questions for you now...sorry :)
Is HDMI that much better than composite? that's assuming I have the list above in the correct order.
Does an optical audio output give a better audio signal than HDMI and composite?
If so, is it worth using audio through the optical output regardless of how your video signal is outputted? (or should that read 'output'??)
What's a component output? And where does it fit on my list?
I guess the 'big daddy' question should be - In an ideal world, what would be the best way to output the video and audio signal from the 360?

Once I buy the TV I'll hopefully be getting a AV receiver as well (the Onkyo SR605) with the 360 going through this with both it's video and audio, so not sure if this changes any of the answers to the above...

Thanks for any help and your paitence... :)
 

sdb123

Distinguished Member
The two best connections would be HDMI or Component. HDMI is essentially a digital version of Component with some protection built in to the way it connects two devices (called handshaking). HDMI from the 360 can also carry 5.1 surround sound. Alternatively, if using the Component connection, you'd need to use an additional Optical cable for the sound.

Both routes will give you what you want however for ease of connectivity into the new Onkyo, I'd recommend using HDMI.

:)
 

kismet110

Well-known Member
Hi,
I'm brand new to this forum, so please excuse me for any gaffs.

Welcome to the Forum :)

I'm doing some preliminary research in to buying a new HDTV (it'll almost certainly be Full HD), and have realised one of the items that'll be plugging in to my new HDTV will be my Xbox 360.
The way I see it there are five different methods employed by the 360 in sending a video signal out.
Can you have a look at my list and let me know if I have them right?
1. HDMI
2. Composite
3. VGA
4. SCART
5. The one with the yellow lead for video, and red and white for sound.

I assume you mean Component in place of composite for number 2? In an 'ideal' world HDMI is best followed by VGA then Component. SCART and Composite are best avoided.


Got a couple of questions for you now...sorry :)
Is HDMI that much better than composite? that's assuming I have the list above in the correct order.
Does an optical audio output give a better audio signal than HDMI and composite?
If so, is it worth using audio through the optical output regardless of how your video signal is outputted? (or should that read 'output'??)

HDMI is theoretically the best connection as there is no analogue --> digital conversion. HDMI can carry digital audio but usually a seperate optical output to a suitable amp/receiver will give you more flexibility/options, although bear in mind you'll need the audio dongle (or butcher the component connector) if you use this with an HDMI lead.

What's a component output? And where does it fit on my list?
I guess the 'big daddy' question should be - In an ideal world, what would be the best way to output the video and audio signal from the 360?

Component is a decent output but generally not as good as HDMI or VGA. It would be 3rd in your list usually. In an ideal world you would use the HDMI lead only (if your receiver supports pass-through for the video element) or HDMI & a seperate digital optical cable fed to your sound system.

Once I buy the TV I'll hopefully be getting a AV receiver as well (the Onkyo SR605) with the 360 going through this with both it's video and audio, so not sure if this changes any of the answers to the above...

Don't know anything about this Receiver so can't comment on it's video capabilities or suitability for the 360.

Thanks for any help and your paitence... :)

Most welcome .... :)
 

knownoversight

Standard Member
Thanks guys for your help and advice.

Can I ask another thing, how does VGA differ from HDMI signal?
I pressume one of the difference's is that HDMI also carries the audio, but is there any difference in the visual quality?
What I'm thinking is possibly using the VGA for the visual, and optical for the audio...

...although, now I'm running that scenario through my head...I'm pressuming that an AV reciever can only output one signal at a time, so, how would the reciever deal with potentially two inputs from the 360 at the same time (being a VGA signal and a optical signal..??

You can probably tell this is confusing me a little :)
 

sdb123

Distinguished Member
...although, now I'm running that scenario through my head...I'm pressuming that an AV reciever can only output one signal at a time, so, how would the reciever deal with potentially two inputs from the 360 at the same time (being a VGA signal and a optical signal..??

An AV amp will be able to process separate Video and Audio signals at the same time. If the signal comes in via HDMI, the Onkyo will be able to strip the Video and Audio parts of the signal and output separately.

:)
 

sdb123

Distinguished Member
HDMI is theoretically the best connection as there is no analogue --> digital conversion. HDMI can carry digital audio but usually a seperate optical output to a suitable amp/receiver will give you more flexibility/options, although bear in mind you'll need the audio dongle (or butcher the component connector) if you use this with an HDMI lead.

The Onkyo can process audio over HDMI, so no need for a separate Optical connection if using HDMI.

Component is a decent output but generally not as good as HDMI or VGA. It would be 3rd in your list usually. In an ideal world you would use the HDMI lead only (if your receiver supports pass-through for the video element) or HDMI & a seperate digital optical cable fed to your sound system.

There are no discernable differences between Component, VGA and HDMI. It is all down to personal preference over which one you feel is 'better'.

:)
 

knownoversight

Standard Member

Ah cool, this is what I wanted to hear.
I'm just trying to get my head round all the digital acroynms and technologies...
Actually, bought a fantastic magazine about all things HD the other day, very helpful and informative. It's taken me from knowing very little to a state of just needing the i's dotted and the t's crossed. Can't remember what it was called, but it's got a picture of a HDTV on the front with a sunset on it with a little child pointing at the sun (just in case anyone else tries to find it..bought it from the ASDA).

Thanks for your help guys, I really appreciate it.
For the uninitated, HD can be a bit of a minefield.
 

dan1979

Well-known Member
Try wikipedia if you have an acronym that's confusing you.

Your best bet is to run the 360 at 720p if you're just playing games as that's the resolution they're programmed at, setting it to 1080p is just upscaling, it's better to let the TV to upscale it instead as I've found the xbox scaler to be pretty poor.
 

knownoversight

Standard Member
I'll try Widipedia if I get in to trouble.

You've touched on something I wasn't aware of though, I didn't realise you could set the output on the 360 to either 720p or 1080p (sorry, showing my ignorance.. :)
So I guess, from what you're saying, is as far as the screen is concerned there's no real advantage to having a 1080p to a 720p resolution...?

Try wikipedia if you have an acronym that's confusing you.

Your best bet is to run the 360 at 720p if you're just playing games as that's the resolution they're programmed at, setting it to 1080p is just upscaling, it's better to let the TV to upscale it instead as I've found the xbox scaler to be pretty poor.
 

sdb123

Distinguished Member
I'll try Widipedia if I get in to trouble.

You've touched on something I wasn't aware of though, I didn't realise you could set the output on the 360 to either 720p or 1080p (sorry, showing my ignorance.. :)
So I guess, from what you're saying, is as far as the screen is concerned there's no real advantage to having a 1080p to a 720p resolution...?

For pure gaming, no there is not.

What display are you thinking of getting?
 

knownoversight

Standard Member
The screen I'm currently looking at buying is the Sony KDL-40W2000.
It's had pretty good reviews, but by the time I get round to buying it something better might have come along...
 

sdb123

Distinguished Member
is it worth setting the xbox to 1080i or should stick with 720p?

If you have a 1080p display all you need to do is set the X-Box to either 720p, 1080i or 1080p and see which of those settings you prefer. On anything other than 720p and 1080i your display will either be scaling or de-interlacing. If set to 1080p the 360 is doing all the scaling.

Whichever looks 'best' is entirely your preference. ;)
 

pro-crast

Standard Member
Try wikipedia if you have an acronym that's confusing you.

Your best bet is to run the 360 at 720p if you're just playing games as that's the resolution they're programmed at, setting it to 1080p is just upscaling, it's better to let the TV to upscale it instead as I've found the xbox scaler to be pretty poor.


Thanks for that thread - very useful. I have one other question though, do any of you know how to run sources (a wii) on different resolutions as per your comment above, is this via the TV as I can't seem to find anything in the manual?


Ta
 

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